Search found 89 matches

by Mindworm
Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:34 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: "Simplest Conceivable"
Replies: 54
Views: 8830

Re: "Simplest Conceivable"

While a Probabilistic Turing Machine can solve PP problems and is therefore equivalent to a Quantum Turing Machine it isn't yet shown that a Classical (deterministic) Turing Machine is equivalent to a Probabilistic Turing Machine and consequently it isn't yet shown that a Quantum Turing Machine is ...
by Mindworm
Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:12 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Tensors
Replies: 8
Views: 2451

Re: Tensors

I like the physics definition! It is great for discovering the connection. You note that the derivative does not transform like a tensor, but you really wish it did, so you add the piece you need to make it a tensor. Success! There is a lot to be said for having an intuition of something (my intuit...
by Mindworm
Wed Oct 31, 2012 8:23 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

We're not talking about glossalia or having visions, we're talking about feeling connected to the social group, of 'being able to swim when joining a community of fish', to use a crude analogy. I don't get that from anything you or someone else linked in this thread. The wikipedia article especiall...
by Mindworm
Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:46 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

Yes, lets clarify something here; The gene is not hypothetical, it's affect is. It's function is known. No one is suggesting is 'causes human beings to join a religion', it's been hypothesized that the genes affect causes individuals to be predisposed towards having religious/spiritual experiences....
by Mindworm
Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:08 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Tensors
Replies: 8
Views: 2451

Re: Tensors

Ah ha! you're right. By the way, for now I'm only worried about Tensor products over vector spaces and no other generalizations. Ok you answered all of my questions I think but here's the next one: Is the tensor product of dual spaces isomorphic to multilinear functions from the Cartesian product o...
by Mindworm
Wed Oct 31, 2012 6:34 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

By any reasonable definition of religion, there aren't any religious animals. Therefore, none of them have a gene that causes religion. Not even in a statistical sense. They might have neurological phenomena which are similar to religious experiences in humans. Also: what Little Bobby Tables said. ...
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:47 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

ahammel wrote:
Mindworm wrote:This gene obviously isn't found in animals.

That isn't at all obvious to me.

By any reasonable definition of religion, there aren't any religious animals. Therefore, none of them have a gene that causes religion. Not even in a statistical sense.
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:32 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

Your polar bear example isn't supporting any point; a pressure existed, an organism adapted, males that possess that adaptation are now sexy to females. The same can be said for this gene; culture began developing, a mutation arose that made some particularly prone to feelings of connectivity and a...
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:07 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

Society is most certainly an environmental factor; what makes you think that social pressures aren't influencing reproductive choice? Yes, they are. But that doesn't explain why humans should have a religious gene (note that I'm not convinced for reasons that were already pointed out by other peopl...
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:55 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

Izawwlgood wrote:In a religious society, religious people enjoy greater success.

You're missing the point. Society isn't some given environmental factor, it's made of people. So you're making a circular argument.
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:28 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: God Gene
Replies: 38
Views: 5694

Re: God Gene

Izawwlgood wrote:And that such a trait would be advantageous to have in a world/culture dominated by religion. That the social environment makes having such a trait an advantage.

People are religious because they are religious?
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:52 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Tensors
Replies: 8
Views: 2451

Re: Tensors

Multilinear map seems to be the first definition of a tensor which is nice and basic. The next definition is that a tensor is an element of the tensor product and you define the tensor product in terms of the free vector space and all and you can show that it satisfies the universal property which ...
by Mindworm
Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:09 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: integrer sequences
Replies: 7
Views: 2343

Re: integrer sequences

There are uncountably many infinitely-long integer sequences but only countably many algorithms and formulas; so most infinite integer sequences have no finite-length description. Note however that SOME do; for example there are many known finite expressions for pi. Likewise sqrt(2) is a finite str...
by Mindworm
Sun Oct 28, 2012 3:01 pm UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Ban the person above you
Replies: 20286
Views: 1229298

Re: Ban the person above you

flicky1991 wrote:Banned for expecting research.

Away with you, who driveth on the left side. I cast you out! In the name of all that is sane and healthy, go back to whence you came.
I banish thee, Speaker of Funny Accents, inhabitant of the realm of eternal sunlight, BEGONE!
by Mindworm
Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:03 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: "Simplest Conceivable"
Replies: 54
Views: 8830

Re: "Simplest Conceivable"

1+1=2 may sound fairly simple until you remember that it implies the complex number plane, pi and the mandelbrot set before we get to the first digit... How does "1 + 1 = 2" imply the complex number plane, pi and the Mandelbrot set? That's not even well defined. These are objects, not sta...
by Mindworm
Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:08 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: Amusing science misconceptions
Replies: 161
Views: 28401

Re: Amusing science misconceptions

My professors call maths and CS "structural sciences". They're alone in this category. By virtue of having tenure they must be right, hence CS is a science.

Besides, why would people ever put "Science" in the name of something that isn't a science? That would be misleading.
by Mindworm
Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:47 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Homotopy
Replies: 7
Views: 1403

Re: Homotopy

Oh, and I was wrong: The converse of (wrong 2) isn't true. The statement is only true for the empty space, which isn't nullhomotopic. The mistake was in assuming that there is a constant map. Oops.
by Mindworm
Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:26 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Homotopy
Replies: 7
Views: 1403

Re: Homotopy

2 is actually true and so is its converse (see Hatcher - Algebraic Topology, pg 19, exercise 10.) Note that, if you're trying to show that every pair of maps are homotopic, then in particular you only need to show that any map is null-homotopic, that is, homotopic to a constant map. Not so. To elab...
by Mindworm
Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:13 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Triangulation of a torus
Replies: 4
Views: 3901

Re: Triangulation of a torus

That one seems valid. Of course you do need the three lines and three points seperately, but I think they were implied in the picture. edit: Weird. In researching why there was even a question in this thread, I think I stumbled upon two non-equivalent definitions of simplicial (cell) complexes. The ...
by Mindworm
Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:49 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Why is calculus such a big deal?
Replies: 11
Views: 3516

Re: Why is calculus such a big deal?

it seems like most of the stuff you have to do in calculus (in undergrad anyway) a computer can do much much better than you. In fact, it seemed like the higher up I went with Calculus at university, the less I learned about actually doing maths, and the more I learned about how to use MapleTM. It ...
by Mindworm
Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:19 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: Amusing science misconceptions
Replies: 161
Views: 28401

Re: Amusing science misconceptions

A big problem with the notion of "detox" is the notion that there is some separate class of substances in your body called "toxins" in the first place, though. Yes, everything can kill you in large enough doses. However, you can consume kilograms of something and be fine, and mi...
by Mindworm
Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:05 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Group elements and their inverses.
Replies: 5
Views: 1457

Re: Group elements and their inverses.

You stopped directly in front of your goal. Everything you did is both right and useful, now what is (bca)^(-1)?
Hint: (bca)=(b(ca)) and you probably know what (ab)^(-1) is.
by Mindworm
Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:57 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: Questions For The World
Replies: 2216
Views: 458654

Re: Questions For The World

Turns out there are rules and my English teachers just never bothered mentioning them. Probably because the answer to a German asking: "Can I put this into a compound noun?" is almost always no. At least not without a hyphen or blank space, and that's not what they wanted to do.
by Mindworm
Thu Oct 11, 2012 2:21 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: Questions For The World
Replies: 2216
Views: 458654

Re: Questions For The World

Oh, I wasn't aware that English had rules for compound nouns. I just assumed that it was put into a compound for naming purposes :oops: .
by Mindworm
Thu Oct 11, 2012 12:08 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: Questions For The World
Replies: 2216
Views: 458654

Re: Questions For The World

Ditto for German. This seems to be independent of the accentuated syllables. I also have a new question: How is the "Wolfskin" in "Jack Wolfskin" parsed? Wolf skin or wolf's kin? Both seem vaguely meaningful, with the skin being marginally more likely as it emphasizes clothing. G...
by Mindworm
Mon Oct 08, 2012 5:23 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Religion: The Deuce
Replies: 5301
Views: 602109

Re: Religion: The Deuce

What else is there? (I believe that logic and math, e.g., are essentially about imagination and creativity). That's one half of it. The other half is formulating your Idea in formal language and bringing it in a form in which anyone (in extreme cases, a computer) can verify it. There are also provi...
by Mindworm
Mon Oct 08, 2012 3:39 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Religion: The Deuce
Replies: 5301
Views: 602109

Re: Religion: The Deuce

I can imaging a universe without God, but I cannot imagine a universe (where I/we exist) that is not predictable. Your imagination is a very poor judge (as is anyones, probably). The belief in god, more specifically the belief that nature has a divine order and that we can discover it, is what more...
by Mindworm
Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:37 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: True or False in Geometry
Replies: 17
Views: 6271

Re: True or False in Geometry

An alternate is perhaps to say that "If two lines that have no common points are parallel, then your space is Euclidean and 2-D." That's perhaps too strong a statement. I'm pretty sure there are other geometries which make that statement true, if only by virtue of having no lines that hav...
by Mindworm
Sun Aug 26, 2012 5:54 pm UTC
Forum: General
Topic: xkcd.com/1096/ "Clinically Studied Ingredient" is offensive
Replies: 206
Views: 29576

Re: xkcd.com/1096/ "Clinically Studied Ingredient" is offens

If you're in the majority (in this case, not infected with an STI) According to figures posted in this thread (and wikipedia), that's not a majority. Just saying. If all people who have herpes or HPV really want something, it will be done. Or at least there will be quite an awareness for their wish...
by Mindworm
Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:31 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Eigenvalues problem - bidirectional proof?
Replies: 15
Views: 4770

Re: Eigenvalues problem - bidirectional proof?

2. How would I go about proving this in the other direction? I tried writing it out but it seemed like I was just writing my first proof backwards. Is this one of those cases where proving the case in one direction also proves it in the other direction? Yes. Consider A=(1/s)(sA+t Id)+(-t/s)Id. Also...
by Mindworm
Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:15 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: pointwise a.e. convergence
Replies: 4
Views: 1972

Re: pointwise a.e. convergence

Giallo, sum( |a_n f_n| ) is only a function in L_2:R->R if it converges everywhere in R... So applying the L_2 norm to it is at the very least sloppy, and at the worst presuming the answer to the question in the answer. Actually that can be saved pretty easily. We are talking about \sup_{n}\sum_{i=...
by Mindworm
Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:42 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

Re: QM - Time Ordering Operator

All I can say is- sit down and work through it and you may find yourself surprised. The parameters supply you with coordinates, and you can use that to build up the topology, which is of course backwards from the usual way of doing things because mathematicians want to be as general as possible. I'...
by Mindworm
Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:28 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

Re: QM - Time Ordering Operator

@akalexke: That would be fine, except that's not how the time ordering operator is used(it usually doesn't get this much arguments). Look at your own example. I think using it as a simplification of notation is the right idea, since your definition, while rigorous, already implies that it can't be u...
by Mindworm
Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:47 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

Re: QM - Time Ordering Operator

That sort of attitude irks me though. I am firmly a physicist, but we need to be sure the emperor actually has some clothes on underneath it all. To preserve my sanity I am working under the assumption that most things could theoretically be well defined, if one was willing to get at least a bachel...
by Mindworm
Thu Jul 26, 2012 10:24 am UTC
Forum: Fictional Science
Topic: What alternatives to Creation VS Evolution are there?
Replies: 59
Views: 17445

Re: What alternatives to Creation VS Evolution are there?

What about Boltzmann's theory? If we postulate a universe with maximal entropy and random spikes downward, it becomes more likely that the universe as we see it, stars, species and all, was "created" like 5 minutes ago (including memories of a more distant past) and merely looks like it sh...
by Mindworm
Mon Jul 23, 2012 2:13 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

Re: QM - Time Ordering Operator

Wait A(t) and A(t') are time-independent? Maybe I misunderstand, but is the " t " and the " t' " not time? And if they were independent, it simply means that you leave the order as is Maybe I should use less description and more formulas so the idea becomes clearer: When I say &...
by Mindworm
Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:24 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

Re: QM - Time Ordering Operator

Well. From the definition it's a bilinear map from the space of operators to the space of operators. Which is not that special. Except that that doesn't seem to be enough. A(t) and A(t') are both time-independent operators, so T wouldn't know the order in which it should multiply them. You need t a...
by Mindworm
Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:50 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: QM - Time Ordering Operator
Replies: 28
Views: 7264

QM - Time Ordering Operator

QM was the first lecture I've ever heard, where just about everything the professor said was (strictly speaking) wrong, and I've experienced some difficulties trying to learn this stuff by heart or work with it. Still, most things gave the impression that they could be well-defined, if one would bot...
by Mindworm
Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:50 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Why does a Taylor series work?
Replies: 45
Views: 13264

Re: Why does a Taylor series work?

h(x 2 , x 1 ) is always undefined, but g(h(x 2 , x 1 ) is not. So g is a function that maps [undefined] to something? In that case, we're not working with functions on the reals any more, because [undefined] isn't a real number. What kind of number is [undefined]? It's not. That's my point. If h is...
by Mindworm
Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:23 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Why does a Taylor series work?
Replies: 45
Views: 13264

Re: Why does a Taylor series work?

Well, for starters: There is no "/". It is shorthand for multiplying with the multiplicative inverse, which 0 doesn't have. So 0/0 is meaningless. However, f(x)=(x-2)/(x-2) isn't meaningless. It's just a function defined on R\2. What allows you to take the limit as x approaches 2 is the fa...

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