Search found 98 matches

by torne
Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:47 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Does anyone here...
Replies: 38
Views: 5661

I just feel superior. :)
by torne
Mon Sep 24, 2007 12:18 pm UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Inexplicable bluescreen (Windows XP Home)
Replies: 8
Views: 2256

I would have suggested that, but it tends to be empty most of the time for me, that, and I can usually tell what did cause the problem from a BSOD. Though that's because I recognize the name of the nvidia graphics drivers XD You don't really need to read the BSOD for that either, though - if you ha...
by torne
Mon Sep 24, 2007 12:10 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Fizzbuzz!
Replies: 81
Views: 233534

what about in assembly? because it is basically not abstract, could it be that the actual compiled code count for the size? I'd do that now if I wasn't at work :) x86 DOS COM executables can be written entirely using printable ASCII characters, too, for maximum amusement (thus meaning you could sti...
by torne
Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:20 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Backing Up a RAID array
Replies: 12
Views: 2973

There's also the classic reason for backups, which is when users come to you and say "I just deleted $IMPORTANT_FILE". RAID1 faithfully mirrors such a deletion, naturally :)
by torne
Tue Sep 18, 2007 1:00 pm UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Backing Up a RAID array
Replies: 12
Views: 2973

Re: Backing Up a RAID array

New question: What if the array was made up of 2x146GB drives, or 4x73 GB drives? Then I would need a larger backup medium, right? MrJ's response covers the backup thing pretty well, but I just thought I should note here: RAID1 doesn't mean storing everything twice, it means storing everything on a...
by torne
Mon Sep 17, 2007 11:48 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Triple Booting?
Replies: 11
Views: 2213

It should be trivial - installing Windows via Boot Camp should cause no problems with an existing EFI-bootable Linux installation. Boot Camp already takes care of bootloaders and so on for you - EFI machines don't boot via real-mode code in the MBR anyway so it matters little what bootloader is ther...
by torne
Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:02 pm UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: [SOLVED] Putty and tunneling
Replies: 5
Views: 2072

If you want it to just work for any destination, you want dynamic SOCKS based forwarding for most programs. Configure PuTTY as follows: 1) Go to Connection -> SSH -> Tunnels 2) Enter some port number of your choice (1080 is standard) for the source port 3) Leave the destination field blank 4) Select...
by torne
Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:01 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

Most people defend the hell out of goto because they have their own special "syntactic style" such that in their mind any blocks of repeated code feel "dirty" to them when they see it. Most other people feel this way about seeing "gotos". People get really angry about ...
by torne
Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:07 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: need a hand (java compilation)
Replies: 6
Views: 2073

Well, yes, that too, but you can check that by firing up your tests on an older VM. :)
by torne
Mon Aug 20, 2007 12:30 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: need a hand (java compilation)
Replies: 6
Views: 2073

It's just -target that you need. You can still use 1.5 source or whatever, as they can be made to generate bytecode compatible with old VMs.
by torne
Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:00 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: C++ Help
Replies: 24
Views: 3936

I would agree with you more if not for len() and its ilk. If you don't like the builtin convenience wrappers, don't use them. They are syntactic sugar to make programs easier to read. I would imagine you don't write a.__add__(b) instead of a+b, hmm? The behavior of list .sort() is also bizarre and ...
by torne
Thu Aug 16, 2007 9:54 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: C++ Help
Replies: 24
Views: 3936

Python and Ruby are good OO languages, but Ruby is more so. In Ruby, truly everything is an object. Er, this is also true in Python. Ruby is in no way 'more OO' than Python - they both have a pretty good copy of the Smalltalk model. Java is the traditional "almost-everything-but-not-quite is a...
by torne
Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:43 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: What does this code do? -- a game
Replies: 52
Views: 9523

In x86_64 they are designed in :) Nice guarantied free space! Hell, you almost *have* to use that space for any CAS based algs (DCAS is rare, and difficult to implement without a hardware instruction). Bah, ARM's used them for ages. The LSB of a function pointer dictates whether the function is enc...
by torne
Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:54 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: What does this code do? -- a game
Replies: 52
Views: 9523

I do bitwise operations on pointers (or addresses in general) all the time in our kernel. Pointers usually have space in them to fit other stuff in, why waste it? ;)
by torne
Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:53 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Vista hates me...
Replies: 22
Views: 3731

Amnesiasoft wrote:
ubergeek42 wrote:The space issue sounds like 48bit lba support got disabled in the bios update.

I don't think that was it, but it doesn't matter anymore, a reboot fixed it. (or maybe it was SP2)

XP requires SP1 or higher to use LBA48, so that'll be it :)
by torne
Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:05 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Ideas on improving security for my program?
Replies: 22
Views: 3636

I still vote for 'rootkit the machine it gets installed on to prevent copying'. But that's just because I'm evil. :)
by torne
Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:35 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Ideas on improving security for my program?
Replies: 22
Views: 3636

You could always go with some amusing virus-like behaviour :) Encrypt the binary with a random key using a public/private scheme, then shove a loader on it which can go grab the key from the internet. Rootkit the system to protect yourself from being dumped from memory while executing (hooray for I/...
by torne
Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:26 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

Please be aware that when I say C++ exception, I'm referring to the ISO IEC-14882-2003 standard. Regardless of what the standard says, it's still possible to implement nested exceptions that work using ordinary C++ behaviour. Ours/RVCT's (hard to say who really implements it, a bit of both) appears...
by torne
Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:46 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

Exceptions are expensive in a completely different way. I'm not sure if I would want them in kernels. We don't :) Exceptions are not used in our kernel. Edit: What I'm referring to here is C++ exceptions based on how they are implemented in C++. Because of how they work, you can only have a single ...
by torne
Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:32 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Can anyone recommend a Python compiler/IDE?
Replies: 33
Views: 5550

I didn't realize he was trying to hide his code, I thought he just didn't want people to have to bother with source code. I may have misinterpreted, but still, it's true information :) Comparing Python bytecode to JVM/CLR/etc bytecode is a bit off for that reason, simply because Python bytecode is ...
by torne
Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:48 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

davean wrote:RAII isn't necessarily sufficient to be transactional (rarely is).

That too, but it lessens the likelihood that you have a pressing need to goto. I never said it was bad in other contexts :)
by torne
Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:47 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Can anyone recommend a Python compiler/IDE?
Replies: 33
Views: 5550

You don't need source code to run Python (it can do everything at the bytecode level, just like Java), and there are programs that basically create an optimized interpreter for your optimized Python code, that runs as a single executable binary in Windows. This doesn't protect your code very much, ...
by torne
Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:30 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

If you program in an environment where you can't do RAII (C, or C++ in environments where exceptions are broken, missing or just too expensive) then goto is vital for handling errors without copying and pasting your cleanup code eight zillion times. gotos which only jump forwards in an unambiguous w...
by torne
Wed Aug 01, 2007 4:19 pm UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Alternatives to the dreaded goto
Replies: 114
Views: 19442

Rule of thumb: if a goto to a label that is both lexically and unambiguously logically *after* the goto would make the code simpler/shorter, and you can't achieve the same effect with break/etc, use the goto. Gotos make code hard to read when you jump backwards, or into contexts you weren't previous...
by torne
Sat Jul 28, 2007 6:40 pm UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: VNC and NX
Replies: 3
Views: 2759

It has to poll the screen for updates, if you don't use one, then go and make lots of fiddly copies of the result. DFMirage hooks into the screen update process so it automatically gets an opportunity to make a single easy copy of every update and chuck it straight into the VNC server.
by torne
Thu Jul 26, 2007 3:13 pm UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Linux-y-ness
Replies: 15
Views: 3568

If you want to boot from a CD to just try it out, try either the Ubuntu or Knoppix livecds. Ubuntu is also a good user-friendly desktop type distribution to install.
by torne
Thu Jul 26, 2007 10:05 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Java to C Compiler/Translator?
Replies: 18
Views: 8345

Generics could (possibly) be handled by checking the class of objects before they are put into the collection That's how generics work anyway in a JVM. The generated VM bytecode just contains the regular, Object-accepting collection classes, and inserts casts in all the places where you would've ha...
by torne
Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:46 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: VNC and NX
Replies: 3
Views: 2759

Have you got a video hook driver installed on the Windows machine? VNC servers on windows without are pretty slow. Look for the DFMirage driver on TightVNC's page.
by torne
Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:42 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Languages that handle infinite recursion
Replies: 40
Views: 8071

priapus wrote:What I mean is, if you're willing to write tail recursive code like this:
<snip>
it wouldn't stack overflow, would be fast, and could be generalized for all 'infinite accumulation' problems.

Apart from the minor inconvenience that it won't halt on many expressions :)
by torne
Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:26 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Languages that handle infinite recursion
Replies: 40
Views: 8071

You would need a system where evaluation of functions is done by inspecting their definitions - this excludes pretty much everything other than mathematica and the like. I don't know if even they will be happy with it - you probably have to define the expression as part of a summation with infinite ...
by torne
Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:22 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Windows Taskman
Replies: 19
Views: 4608

There was a major security breach in Windows NT, which enabled access to the entire hard drive of other computers on the network via WINS address (in the form "\\comp_name\c$"). Er, this is a completely intended, documented feature. It's always worked that way and it still works that way ...
by torne
Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:20 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Wifi help
Replies: 3
Views: 2323

Sadly no, data is sent whenever it's ready to be sent. The beacon is just for maintaining association.
by torne
Mon Jul 23, 2007 11:15 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Wifi help
Replies: 3
Views: 2323

Re: Wifi help

I do know some wireless phones really crap out a wifi signal but which ones? and is there anything i can do to reduce the interference? (i can't get a new phone system, out of the question) Change the channel. If none of them are any better, then it's tough. :) Also, i know that i can change the ch...
by torne
Mon Jul 23, 2007 11:09 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: 64 bit Windows
Replies: 6
Views: 2958

Thing is, a 32 bit program will run slower in 32 bit legacy mode on a 64 bit chip than it would on a 32 bit chip of otherwise equivalent specs I hope you mean "when running a 64 bit OS using something like WoW64 to run the 32 bit code".. because otherwise you're wrong and in fact the oppo...
by torne
Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:58 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: OS question
Replies: 15
Views: 6294

coLinux is yet another choice; it is far, far faster than VMWare. It doesn't support running as a seperate 'screen' - you just run a Windows X server and have your Linux apps connect to that (so they just appear running side by side with your Windows apps). It's pretty easy to get going. For the te...
by torne
Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:54 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Making a scriptable c++ application?
Replies: 8
Views: 2521

There are tricks with embedded python that allow C++ classes to be reflected. You might also want to consider Lua.
by torne
Wed Jul 18, 2007 11:37 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Any experience with working on larger projects?
Replies: 29
Views: 5515

Yup, that's exactly it. Passing changes around that aren't ready for integration, or at least, not integration all the way to the top. Managing a tree of branches like that is possible in many centralised VCSes, but they're usually crap at it, and it ends up being a lot of work. It's also usually ve...
by torne
Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:27 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Dual boot screen slide and python stickyness
Replies: 4
Views: 3512

Thanks a lot. I'm not an expert or anything, but I'm surprised I'd never seen that before. It seems kind of silly, though: if they want to make it so you cna have another name for the same thing, can't they just use something like #define? Again, I'm not an expert in C either. In most languages, a ...
by torne
Mon Jul 16, 2007 11:22 am UTC
Forum: The Help Desk
Topic: Dual boot screen slide and python stickyness
Replies: 4
Views: 3512

Re: Dual boot screen slide and python stickyness

I just want a[2][1] to change. I've never had this problem before, and now it's 4 AM and I'm trying to code something badly and simply and it's doing that. Also, I passed a similiar matrix into a function, made newmatrix = oldmatrix and newmatrix2 = oldmatrix, and whatever I did to one of them happ...
by torne
Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:42 am UTC
Forum: Coding
Topic: Any experience with working on larger projects?
Replies: 29
Views: 5515

that really depends on other things than size imho. for a software company centralised repository is perfectly fine no matter how big a project it is. My experience working at software companies that use centralised repositories leads me to disagree. Multi-tier integration (you submit your changes ...

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