Search found 12 matches

by Marius Magnus
Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:46 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: A question for Physics experts.
Replies: 23
Views: 3703

Re: A question for Physics experts.

btilly wrote:Feynman, blah blah blah


Ah, I see. I guess you can think of it either way, then. Yet another instance of "They're just equations; don't think too hard about what they mean!". :P
by Marius Magnus
Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:26 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: A question for Physics experts.
Replies: 23
Views: 3703

Re: A question for Physics experts.

Mass does NOT increase with velocity in special or general relativity; the idea that it does is the result of poor pedagogy. What actually happens is that momentum changes. In classical mechanics, momentum is defined by p = mv But in relativistic mechanics, this is not so. Momentum is given by p = y...
by Marius Magnus
Wed Mar 12, 2008 5:53 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: TI-Nspire
Replies: 51
Views: 8808

Re: TI-Nspire

I think I'll stick with the good ol' hp48. RPN forever. Word. I have an HP48 and HP49G. Although honestly, I don't usually use a calculator so much anymore. The vast majority of my problems don't even involve numbers, and when they do, I'm usually working at a computer, and I can just fire up Maple...
by Marius Magnus
Wed Mar 05, 2008 8:49 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Is there an electron for every proton in the universe?
Replies: 10
Views: 2193

Re: Is there an electron for every proton in the universe?

It is unclear whether the universe must have neutral charge or not. If the universe is closed (that is, the global geometry of space is closed) and compact, then the universe must be neutral. This is implied by Maxwell's equations; specifically, the Gauss law: div E = rho / e 0 Consider a universe w...
by Marius Magnus
Sat Mar 01, 2008 10:07 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?
Replies: 16
Views: 3289

Re: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?

And here the villains come with their torches and pitchforks...this is a webcomic forum, people; surely a little levity is in order? If I want to mean "commonplace", "ordinary", or "everyday", I tend to use one of those words. "Regular" I tend to reserve for t...
by Marius Magnus
Fri Feb 29, 2008 10:16 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?
Replies: 16
Views: 3289

Re: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?

Because I'm a prescriptivist grammar nazi interested in the original meanings of words, and what I think about words is (usually) correct.

ETA: What? Did you want me to say something else?
by Marius Magnus
Fri Feb 29, 2008 5:15 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?
Replies: 16
Views: 3289

Re: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?

In my mind, "regular" and "mundane" have entirely different meanings; you can't substitute one for the other. "Regular" means something happens repeatedly, in consistent intervals: the phases of the moon are regular, the sun rises and sets on a regular basis, and if you...
by Marius Magnus
Fri Feb 29, 2008 3:42 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien
Replies: 55
Views: 8765

Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Well, this is meant to be a Tolkien thread and not a Rowling thread, but it appears to be going that way. Anyway, I thought Rowling's writing was fine until she started making movies. And that is when she started writing movie scripts instead of novels. The books begin to decline after the fourth bo...
by Marius Magnus
Fri Feb 29, 2008 3:18 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?
Replies: 16
Views: 3289

Re: Plain Vs. Academic or Regular English?

Not sure if this relates to your case, but in my opinion, conciseness is more important than diction. That is, one should choose words ("big" or not) which serve the purpose of communicating clearly and succinctly, with a minimum of fluff. The most eminent danger in using the more sesquipe...
by Marius Magnus
Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:37 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Foreign declensions of borrowed English words.
Replies: 26
Views: 4264

Re: Foreign declensions of borrowed English words.

"Second" is a borrowing from Latin, etymologically related to "sequence" and "segue". It means "following". The original Anglo-Saxon word for the second ordinal number was "other". Words like "both", "other", and "either"...
by Marius Magnus
Thu Feb 21, 2008 11:29 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien
Replies: 55
Views: 8765

Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

2. Revive archaic elements of English grammar, such as V2 word order and simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming"). ... Oh, and by the way, I'm new. Hi there! Welcome :) Just a note- that's actually an example of using the simple present as opposed to using the p...
by Marius Magnus
Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:52 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien
Replies: 55
Views: 8765

Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Tolkien wrote in a deliberately archaic style. He was a professor of linguistics, with a specialization in Anglo-Saxon and Norse languages, and he wrote in such a way as to mimic the epic poems such as Beowulf and the Norse sagas and eddas. In other writings (not LotR), he even wrote in alliterative...

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