Search found 14 matches

by Alces
Fri Sep 02, 2011 11:08 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Little editing/grammar mistakes that drive you up the wall
Replies: 784
Views: 110687

Re: Little editing/grammar mistakes that drive you up the wa

'Than' and 'then' are etymologically identical--they derive from different inflected forms of the same Old English adverb þanne. 'then' was used in comparatives because just as 'then' introduces a new event, it would introduce a new noun to the comparison: I'm taller, then you (are not so tall). The...
by Alces
Sun Sep 26, 2010 9:29 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Combining Contractions
Replies: 20
Views: 3757

Re: Combining Contractions

I'd've is perfectly normal to me while the other three are not something I'd ever say. Interesting. Maybe it's because the 've is just the word 'have' with h-dropping and a reduced vowel, which is done with all function words in English, and so it does not really function like the other contraction ...
by Alces
Sun Sep 26, 2010 9:22 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287515

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

It could be related to the French shift. However, the fronting of /u/ has happened many times in European languages, for unknown reasons. I don't think this applies to languages in other parts of the world, though I might be wrong. It's happened in Ancient Greek, French, Dutch, and is happening in E...
by Alces
Sat Sep 11, 2010 9:48 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287515

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I live in Merseyside in England, around the boundary of Scouse accents vs. Lancastrian accents, so my accent is a sort of hybrid of the two. I've got features of both. - My speech is non-rhotic. Traditionally Lancashire accents retained rhoticity, but this is very rare nowdays, in the south at least...
by Alces
Fri Sep 10, 2010 10:41 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Interesting features in your conlang
Replies: 93
Views: 49446

Re: Interesting features in your conlang

How many of you actually created a language or instead just forked and modified one? I am thinking about just forking one because creating one from scratch seems a little ridiculous. I've created most of my conlangs from scratch. It's not much more work than deriving one from another language; I me...
by Alces
Fri Sep 10, 2010 10:37 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: If you had to do a project...
Replies: 27
Views: 4014

Re: If you had to do a project...

Things like ending a sentence with a preposition, using 'who' instead of 'whom', saying 'where is that at', etc. are not real language mistakes, just deviations from the standard. If a significant number of people use language in that way, then it is correct in their dialect. When people really use ...
by Alces
Fri Sep 10, 2010 10:24 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Praat Frysk! (Frisian Language Thread)
Replies: 20
Views: 10092

Re: Praat Frysk! (Frisian language thread)

heeey, can you post about the sound system and orthography of frisian? how does the grammar compare to dutch? What exactly do you mean? I'm not really big into linguistics (yet?) :) He means what are the sounds used in the language and how are they spelt. I'd be interested to know too, since I can ...
by Alces
Fri Sep 10, 2010 10:14 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: "Twenty-ten" or "two thousand (and) ten"?
Replies: 33
Views: 6970

Re: "Twenty-ten" or "two thousand (and) ten"?

Two thousand and ten for me. And it'll be two thousand and eleven, and two thousand and twelve; only then I might start calling 2013 twenty-thirteen. The 'two thousand and' forms are what I'm used to.
by Alces
Fri Jul 23, 2010 2:23 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: "Greek" Word Pronunciations in BrE.
Replies: 7
Views: 4336

Re: "Greek" Word Pronunciations in BrE.

I'm British and I never even knew people pronounced it /naIki/.

Some of my pronounciations:
- Odysseus - /@"disi@s/
- Plato - /"plA:t8u/
- Athens - /"af@nz/
- Athena - /@"fin@/
- Socrates - /s@"kratiz/
by Alces
Thu Jul 22, 2010 8:06 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Local Colloquialisms
Replies: 51
Views: 13364

Re: Local Colloquialisms

Some Liverpool slang: made up - happy lad - a term of address, equivalent of 'mate' or 'man' or 'guy'. Fairly gender-neutral; 'lass' isn't used. lid, lah - bizarre alterations of 'lad', with the same meaning, as far as I can tell sound - good, cool, etc. to geg in - to comment in a conversation when...
by Alces
Thu Jul 01, 2010 9:00 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Battle of the *langs
Replies: 39
Views: 10484

Re: Battle of the *langs

Latin, classical greek These are very worthwhile to learn since you can read all sorts of philosophy, histories, plays, epic poems, etc. that don't work as well when translated into other languages. auxlangs: Esperanto, Interlingua I'm not a great fan of Esperanto. Its creator clearly wasn't much o...
by Alces
Thu Jul 01, 2010 8:51 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: What is a word?
Replies: 77
Views: 9651

Re: What is a word?

What a word is really depends on the individual conditions of the language, and arbitrary judgements of the person in the grammar. E.g. for English, we could study the phonotactics of the language and say that a word boundary exists when a cluster is found around it that would be impossible within a...
by Alces
Thu Jul 01, 2010 8:36 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Sexy Accents?
Replies: 121
Views: 21477

Re: Sexy Accents?

My favourite accent is Scouse (the Liverpool accent); I live near Liverpool and I think it sounds awesome. My own accent is a little Scouse, but unfortunately lacks the best features, like the crazy intonation and the fricativisation of /k/ to /x/ when not initial. And I lack the dental fricatives (...
by Alces
Thu Jul 01, 2010 8:25 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: R's all over the place?
Replies: 27
Views: 4062

Re: R's all over the place?

Aaaaa. As in flat. As in Æ http://www.stuff.co.uk/calcul_nd.htm That's very unusual if true. Are you sure you're not giving it an exaggerated pronunciation based on the spelling that you wouldn't actually use in normal speech? As for the original question, rhotic sounds do often change, and loss of...

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