Search found 64 matches

by fənɑlədʒɪst
Fri Apr 15, 2011 1:05 am UTC
Forum: Music
Topic: This man is not only talented, but also beautiful.
Replies: 4
Views: 1654

Re: This man is not only talented, but also beautiful.

eh he is kinda on the girly side imo. but if you are in to that then cool. It's not that I'm "into that," but I'll admit that when I first saw him in "How Many Lovers" I thought, "Wow... she's gorgeous..." and then about 2 minutes later I went, "Wait a second... h...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:51 pm UTC
Forum: Music
Topic: This man is not only talented, but also beautiful.
Replies: 4
Views: 1654

This man is not only talented, but also beautiful.

This is my favorite cover by Jhameel. You guys should check out his music, because he has originals too. I believe he offers free downloads of his album. I first discovered him on Reddit.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Feb 09, 2011 2:35 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Engrish, Etc. - The Funny Translations of the World
Replies: 52
Views: 14315

Re: Engrish, Etc. - The Funny Translations of the World

I do love how many Taiwanese will wear shirts with English writing when they have no idea what it says. I will start cracking up in the middle of traffic upon seeing some new awesome shirt. I'll try to start writing these down. :mrgreen: Just the same way many Latin alphabet writers will try to wea...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Feb 09, 2011 2:04 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages
Replies: 46
Views: 24585

Re: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages

I think it may have been a coincidence that a lot of languages used a base 10 counting system then became powerful And it had nothing whatsoever to do with the number of fingers we have? Ah well, I have a funny definition of coincidence. I'm sure they're correlated, but the number of languages that...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Feb 06, 2011 7:15 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Other Languages You've Studied
Replies: 488
Views: 95361

Re: Re:

Hell, you just try learning Japanese, there are not 1, not 2, but 3 different alphabets(and a 4th, but it is just the english spellings of the sounds of the characters) all of which can be used in one sentence. They have a different grammer form for every single goddamn type of sentence that you co...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Feb 06, 2011 6:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages
Replies: 46
Views: 24585

Re: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages

Personally, I think it may have been a coincidence that a lot of languages used a base 10 counting system then became powerful, spreading their mathematical systems to other cultures. Who knows what the counting systems were like back in the days when no one knew there was anyone else in the world o...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Feb 06, 2011 6:40 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: How do foreign languages use metric?
Replies: 32
Views: 7539

Re: How do foreign languages use metric?

Being one of the resident Japanese speakers here, I just wanted to jump in quickly and say that Kizyr's post is basically right, with one exception. Japanese is prone to shorten loan words because they can become exceedingly long in katakana. An example is リモコン (rimokon) for remote control, because ...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:38 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Language / Culture Nexus - What is it?
Replies: 0
Views: 1060

Language / Culture Nexus - What is it?

Can anyone here explain to me the idea of a language / culture nexus? I get the feeling I'm going to regret this after getting a ton of references to lies propagated by Sapir-Whorf enthusiasts. If there are any explanations that don't involve linguistic relativity, then please, let me know your thou...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:29 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Learning multiple languages
Replies: 6
Views: 2954

Re: Learning multiple languages

So, first of all, I want to say that you shouldn't take anything I say too personally. I've been known to sort of be an ass when it comes to language learning, but here are some of my thoughts. I believe, deep down, that anyone can learn a second, third, etc language if they try. If they don't succe...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Dec 29, 2010 10:50 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation
Replies: 13
Views: 3301

Re: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation

I find it far more annoying when people pronounce the letter 'aitch' as 'Haitch'. I would also like to bring back what has become the silent 't' in the word 'exactly'. Some people have told me I'm anally retentive and although I can prove I'm not, i don't think they'd really want to see the evidenc...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sat Dec 18, 2010 10:42 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Sexy Accents?
Replies: 121
Views: 21476

Re: Sexy Accents?

I have googled moaric timing (results e.g. http://www.ling.fju.edu.tw/phono/farrah/Moraic%20Phonology.htm ) but I don't really get it and how it relates to how Japanese sound when speaking English. Japanese uses moraic timing, so each syllable is pronounced for about the same amount of time. So, /k...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sat Dec 18, 2010 10:22 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Praat
Replies: 13
Views: 14124

Re: Praat

There are a few other signs to look at too, like velar pinches for velar stops and rising formants for labials... really high frequency friction for sibilants, but I can't help but feel that spectrograms are lacking in a lot of ways when distinguishing consonants. Basically, you need to have a good ...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:51 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Praat
Replies: 13
Views: 14124

Re: Praat

Added another section to the Praat How-To thingy.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Fri Dec 17, 2010 1:49 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: The h in "mmhm"
Replies: 7
Views: 4004

Re: The h in "mmhm"

Is that the same sounds as in <sigh> (not the word, but the second half of an actual sigh, when one is exhaling)? Because to me the h in mmhm, when extended in duration, sounds identical to the exhalation during a sigh. My next question is, what is the IPA notation for the first half of a sigh, whe...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Thu Dec 16, 2010 8:05 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: The h in "mmhm"
Replies: 7
Views: 4004

Re: The h in "mmhm"

It's an H sound pronounced without opening your mouth. It comes out like noisily breathing through your nose. An [h] sound made without opening your mouth is, by definition, not an [h], as [h] is an oral consonant. The sound in <mmhm> is a voiceless bilabial nasal consonant, transcribed in IPA as [...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:20 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I've actually started that Praat "How to" thread, but I haven't had a change to do anything with it other than put up some info on how to read and write audio files. I'll see if I can find some time later today to do something where you actually look at the spectrograms.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:13 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: singular pronoun for a person?
Replies: 50
Views: 6356

Re: singular pronoun for a person?

supereater14 wrote:but it needs to be accepted by mt english teacher


Your English teacher doesn't know anything about linguistics. Punch THEM in the face. haha
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:11 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: person 1, person 2, and then i (?)
Replies: 8
Views: 2908

Re: person 1, person 2, and then i (?)

If a native speaker says it, then it's correct. End of story.

Now, if you're asking about the "standardized" English of the white upper class, well then, I can tell you that I couldn't care less. Go with whichever one sounds correct to you.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Wed Dec 08, 2010 12:11 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

My clear /l/ is always realized as an alveolar or a dental, but I've never noticed an interdental allophone.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:26 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pitch Accent and Tonal Languages
Replies: 4
Views: 2953

Re: Pitch Accent and Tonal Languages

Oh no, it's fine! I love this topic anyway. Yeah, it's been proven countless times that native speakers of tonal languages are more likely to have perfect or near-perfect pitch. It makes sense, since as we're growing up, we learn what to ignore about language. For example, English speakers learn to ...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:56 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Oh, I had no idea he/she was talking about Appalachian English. I'm not very familiar with the phonological stuffins going on in in Appalachian.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pitch Accent and Tonal Languages
Replies: 4
Views: 2953

Pitch Accent and Tonal Languages

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i176/Zambaru/pitchaccent317.png So, who here has learned one or more languages that use pitch accent , pitch register , tone , or tone contours ? Let's talk about our experiences :) Edit: for the purposes of this discussion, let's use "tone" to mean flat ...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:40 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation
Replies: 13
Views: 3301

Re: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation

When speaking of standardized written English, yes. <uncopyrightable> is definitely an incorrect spelling of /fi:t/, but what does that really matter other than the lack of mutual intelligibility? It doesn't, and I never said otherwise. It's just that, according to the rules of *any* form of writte...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:06 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation
Replies: 13
Views: 3301

Re: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation

And there's no such thing as "correct" and "incorrect" spelling. I think it's stretching the meaning of those words a little too far, to say for example that <uncopyrightable> is anything other than an incorrect way to spell the English word /fi:t/. Actually, I tend to disagree....
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 4:04 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

tesseraktik wrote:You encounter lots of strange sounds when you're into conlangs ;)


Læs lekan. Il skyt Ɲyɲðyyla ntysas, Kaþulua tjòþain. :)

[læs lexaɲ]. [il skyt ɲyɲðy:lɒ ntyzɒs], [kaθɯlɯa tʲɤθaiɲ] :)

I know~ If you spoke Ɲyɲðyyl, you would say Kaþulu :D
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Mon Dec 06, 2010 2:09 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

tesseraktik wrote:I sometimes use a voiceless alveolar lateral fricative /ɬ/ instead of /l/, though; /kʔtʰuːɬu/


Are you Welsh? How can you just nonchalantly mention that you use one of the hardest phones I've ever found (other than implosives) to pronounce Cthulhu? haha
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 9:00 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Praat
Replies: 13
Views: 14124

Praat

Hello all. A few people have mentioned that they'd be interested in learning how to use Praat , a program often used for phonetic analysis of speech. If there's already a topic on this, someone please lock the thread or something like that :P Otherwise, I'll do my best to help out people here. I don...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:47 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Do you use the term "Ginger"?
Replies: 65
Views: 20408

Re: Do you use the term "Ginger"?

The EGE wrote:I don't see an appreciable difference between those two hair colors.


I agree. They look the same to me. They're both red. haha
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:24 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

Did you use a tool to measure your vowel qualities? Yeah, I use Praat and a Praat script I altered to find vowel formant frequencies. I then open the .txt file in Microsoft Excel 2007 and use scatter charts to plot the data points in a chart resembling the acoustic vowel space. You just need to cha...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 4:32 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

This Praat thing sounds interesting. I can at best only guess at my precise pronunciations. I downloaded it, but I can't really figure out how it works. In my introductory linguistics class when we were going over IPA a lot of the class objected to the professor's representation of <sing> as [sɪŋg]...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 4:08 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Misheard and misread words
Replies: 37
Views: 8294

Re: Misheard and misread words

Yeah. I think normal people refer to them as "French dip" and "Italian dip" sandwiches. You usually dip them in some sort of meat-based broth.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:51 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation
Replies: 13
Views: 3301

Re: people who pronounce pronunciation pronounciation

What's the problem? I love when I hear people pronounce <pronunciation> as [pʰɹə.nɑʊn.si.͡eɪ.ʃən]. And there's no such thing as "correct" and "incorrect" spelling. There's only standard and nonstandard, which is basically just claiming that the educated upper-class gets to decide...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:33 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Do you use the term "Ginger"?
Replies: 65
Views: 20408

Re: Do you use the term "Ginger"?

I live in Georgia, USA and we say "redheads." Ginger sounds as British to me as "snog."
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:29 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Misheard and misread words
Replies: 37
Views: 8294

Re: Misheard and misread words

Misread words... Well, until I studied for the GRE, I had always thought [ˈɹɛ.ɾɚ.ɪk] and [ɹə.ˈtʰɔɹ.ɪk] were two different words, with separate but related meanings. It wasn't until my friend read my GRE word list and pronounced <rhetoric> as [ˈɹɛ.ɾɚ.ɪk] that I put two and two together. Also, until o...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 4:49 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Am I the only one who strongly disagrees with the whole idea of teaching people what the phonetic transcription for words is "supposed" to be? As linguists, aren't we supposed to believe in infinite variation? I mean, I've met a native English speaker from the South who shows spirantizati...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 3:34 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

[kəˈθulu] for me. (My /u/ is a bit fronter and more diphthongal than cardinal [u], but it's not so central that I would call it [ʉ].) Interesting. Most of us who claim to have the central [ʉ] are probably speaking General American, since despite linguists using /u/, most US people tend to have a ce...
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 3:30 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Phonetics Study [Can haz lock plz? :D]
Replies: 5
Views: 1781

Re: Phonetic Case Study of two Japanese Speakers

Jolly good. Do you already have Praat and all that jazz?
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 2:02 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

[kəˈθʉlʉ] here.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sun Dec 05, 2010 1:59 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Phonetics Study [Can haz lock plz? :D]
Replies: 5
Views: 1781

Re: Phonetic Case Study of two Japanese Speakers

Do you also love phonetics? It would really be more useful for phonetics than phonology, since generative phonology doesn't really work with real data so much as generalized data.
by fənɑlədʒɪst
Sat Dec 04, 2010 2:56 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287479

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

My relatives ring a /beɪl/ and feed a /bɛl/ to the horse. *shrug*. They ring a bell and feed what to a horse? A bale is a big, rectangular bundle of hay, straw, or other grass-like crop. We use it as livestock feed. The IPA they used actually suggests that they ring a "bale" and feed a &q...

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