Search found 2310 matches

by Derek
Mon Jan 24, 2011 5:59 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0851: "Na"
Replies: 207
Views: 50713

Re: 0851: "Na"

The Memory Remains by Metallica has a bunch of na/da/la's (it varies) at the end. I counted 104.
by Derek
Mon Dec 27, 2010 12:24 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 171963

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

I think this is getting into Sapir-Whorf hypothesis territory. Because English does not distinguish these different uses of possession, we have trouble understanding how they are distinct concepts.
by Derek
Fri Dec 24, 2010 4:52 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 171963

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

I think that has more to do with the nature of the relationship than the grammar. But I don't know, maybe some languages distinguish this in grammar? I wouldn't be surprised anymore.
by Derek
Thu Dec 16, 2010 2:23 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 171963

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

I think "over yonder" suggests something that is further away, probably out of site, where as I should be able to point at something that is "over there". Perhaps "over that way" would be a better equivalent.
by Derek
Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:34 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 171963

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

Am I allowed to name a word simply because I find it picturesque? If so, I would like to see 'yonder' find its way back into general usage. I grew up in the rural South of the United States, where it was used on occasion, and wish I could still hear it. I agree, "over yonder" sounds much ...
by Derek
Tue Dec 14, 2010 6:17 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: singular pronoun for a person?
Replies: 50
Views: 6361

Re: singular pronoun for a person?

"They", and if your teacher doesn't like it they can shove it. Thats always been my approach. Otherwise, either use "he or she" or avoid pronouns altogether, "The person kicked down the door".
by Derek
Thu Dec 09, 2010 10:36 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Sexy Accents?
Replies: 121
Views: 21479

Re: Sexy Accents?

I love the cadence that many Japanese speakers use when speaking English. They tend to add a bunch of vowels/syllables to words (i.e. [su̥pɾiŋŋu] for <spring>), yet somehow still sound slow and measured, probably due to the moraic timing in Japanese. Having watched plenty of anime, I have often lau...
by Derek
Wed Dec 08, 2010 11:05 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Might be velar, but its not a normal dark l (from my understanding, a dark l still has the tip of the tongue touching the roof of the mouth). And yeah, its kind of weird, I don't know why I would have learned to sing with a different articulation than talking (and btw I'm not a singer or anything, i...
by Derek
Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:39 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Where is the place of articulation for y'all's non-velar /l/'s? Mine is dental. I've been asking around/tricking people into being linguistic guinea pigs and I'm finding a fair number of people who also say it dentally rather than alveolarly. I believe all my l's are the same, but they're also comp...
by Derek
Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:16 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"
Replies: 22
Views: 5292

Re: Pronouncing "Cthulhu"

I don't think its that there is "supposed" to be a schwa there, but that most (English) speakers have trouble pronouncing [kθ], so they approximate it with [kəθ].
by Derek
Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:39 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

My dad occasionally has intrusive r in words like "idea". I think its a hold over from non-rhotic Southern accents (note though that his accent is not non-rhotic).
by Derek
Sun Dec 05, 2010 7:57 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Maybe I should make a topic about Praat and how to use it? Would anyone be interested? I don't know everything, but I had to use it extensively for my research project- phonetic case study of two Japanese speakers. Charting vowels and making spectrogram charts with textgrids and such is becoming a ...
by Derek
Sun Dec 05, 2010 9:44 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

It's definitely æ-tensing. Your pronunciation is slightly different from my æ-tensing though. After using Praat and charting my vowels, they average out something like this: /æ/ -> [͡eə] / _ [n], [m] /æ/ -> [͡ei] / _ [ŋ] This Praat thing sounds interesting. I can at best only guess at my precise pr...
by Derek
Sat Dec 04, 2010 8:34 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Think Before Naming Your Child
Replies: 1622
Views: 348557

Re: Think Before Naming Your Child

I don't think he meant IPA [ɑ].
by Derek
Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:44 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I've been noticing my idio/dialect is unfriendly to [æ]. Definitely dialectical is [æ]->[e]/__[ŋ]. I believe this would be æ-tensing . For example, my [æ] is noticeably different before nasals. Before [n] and [m] its closer to [ɛə] and before [ŋ] its [ei]. In fact I don't even consider -ang words t...
by Derek
Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:10 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I use /ɛk sɛɹɚə/. :( I don't really consider the flap to be rhotic. At least not in English. Its just (to me) a very relaxed /d/ or /t/. I don't know if that sounds silly. [ɹ] is the standard English <r>, an alveolar approximant. [ɾ] is the alveolar flap. I think most people consider flaps to be ve...
by Derek
Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:59 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Term for when words look wong?
Replies: 15
Views: 9257

Re: Term for when words look wong?

I've had that happen to me before, though I can't recall what the words were at the time. I can say that for a long time I never made the connection between "segue" and [sɛgweɪ]. I knew what both of them meant, but thought "segue" was pronounced [sɛg] and [sɛgweɪ] was spelled &qu...
by Derek
Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:54 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I have the pen/pin merger as well, and as a result saying [ɛn] feels weird, though I can do it if I wish (which is never). You don't have trouble saying two rhotic sounds in a row? I always feel like Scooby do whenever that happens, unless, weirdly, it's two rhotic shwas in a row. I don't really con...
by Derek
Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:46 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Comma Splices
Replies: 40
Views: 6112

Re: Comma Splices

I always read commas as a short pause, and punctuate my sentences accordingly. Its how I originally learned to read them, seems to fit the prescriptive rules pretty reliably, and makes a lot more sense imo. As a native speaker of English, "I went to the store, and bought dog food." sounds ...
by Derek
Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:53 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Sequentially - According to dictionaries, the "standard" pronunciation for this word should be [sɪkwɛnʃəli], but many speakers I've encountered say [sɪ ŋ kwɛn̠ ʧ əli]. Why? Nasal epenthesis? The postalveolar fricative becoming an affricate is likely the release from the coronal nasal stop...
by Derek
Sat Oct 30, 2010 6:14 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: A regional use of prepositions
Replies: 16
Views: 3680

Re: A regional use of prepositions

Are they saying "on the hallway" or "at the hallway"? You haven't specified. If it's "on", is it possible that this is an accent thing and they are thinking "in" and you are hearing "on" possibly due to some kind of neutralization? I doubt it. Thats...
by Derek
Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: A regional use of prepositions
Replies: 16
Views: 3680

Re: A regional use of prepositions

yeyui wrote:I'm in Kinston, NC. I don't believe I have heard any locals say "in the hallway" yet.

Kinston is pretty far from where I lived (Winston-Salem), but I don't think I've ever heard anyone say anything other than "in the hall".
by Derek
Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:21 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: A regional use of prepositions
Replies: 16
Views: 3680

Re: A regional use of prepositions

yeyui wrote:Also: good to hear from NC. That means that this odd language is not universal through the state. (I'm in North Carolina now.)

Where in NC?
by Derek
Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:30 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: PetsMart and ClimbMax
Replies: 9
Views: 5050

Re: PetsMart and ClimbMax

Aiwendil42 wrote:"PetsMart" is something a bit more interesting, in my opinion anyway, as it can be parsed as a simple compound in either of two ways (pets + mart or pet + smart), or as a portmanteau (pets + smart, joined via the common "s").

I believe thats called a pun.
by Derek
Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:18 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: A regional use of prepositions
Replies: 16
Views: 3680

Re: A regional use of prepositions

In the hallway. North Carolina.
by Derek
Sun Oct 10, 2010 11:08 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1991
Views: 486176

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

A friend of mine insists on saying "colossi." I told him that it's Greek and so the correct non-English pluralization would be "colossoi." He told me he didn't care and kept using the Latin ending. How often does that come up? A lot if you're playing Starcraft 2 :P FTR, I usuall...
by Derek
Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:34 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I'm interested in hearing if anybody here pronounces "get" as [gɪt]. This seems to me like a totally different phenomenon than the pen/pin merger. Other words of interest: milk ([mɪlk] or [mɛlk]), egg ([ɛg] or [eg] or even [eɪg]), both ([boʊθ] or, as my dad says, [boʊlθ] or something like...
by Derek
Sat Aug 21, 2010 3:01 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

You're probably thinking of this : The diphthong /aɪ/ becomes monophthongized to [aː]: Most speakers exhibit this feature at the ends of words and before voiced consonants but not before voiceless consonants; some in fact exhibit Canadian-style raising before voiceless consonants, so that ride is [r...
by Derek
Thu Aug 19, 2010 12:53 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I have heard of several English accents, but I don't think I could identify any other than RP/generic and Cockney. That's exactly the case for me as well! The speech around here is purely rhotic, and I hear myself pronouncing 'r' rhotically, but if I listen to a recording of my voice, the 'r' tends ...
by Derek
Wed Aug 18, 2010 5:00 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 944
Views: 287706

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I'm from North Carolina. Some of the things already mentioned: -Pin-pen merger: I'm pretty sure I was even given those words as an example of homophones in elementary school. I found out that they were different for most people when I started reading about linguistics on Wikipedia (which is the same...

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