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My Hobby: Working around missing functionality

Posted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:08 am UTC
by sm_dt_fire
Recipe: Bluetooth Wake-up Light

1) Phillips Wake-up light with FM Radio
2) Computer with audio out and a playlist on repeat
3) Muted speakers
4) Audio-to-FM dongle
5) Uninterruptible Power Supply

Re: My Hobby: Working around missing functionality

Posted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 5:33 am UTC
by ucim
What's the missing functionality? I was going to guess "waking up to my music", but the speakers are muted. Unless you mean the computer speakers are muted, so the wake-up light plays the bluetooth-to-fm of your playlist, in which case, cool.

My favorite bodge was putting an 8 bit memory card in a 16 bit computer (or was it a 16 in a 32, I forget)... because of the bit mismatch, the memory was slow, but windows insisted on managing the memory itself, slowing the entire computer down. So, I assigned it all to a ram disk, and then put my swap file on that ram disk. So I had memory pretending to be a hard drive pretending to be memory. Made a world of difference in the computer speed.

Jose

Re: My Hobby: Working around missing functionality

Posted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:41 pm UTC
by phlip
ucim wrote:
What's the missing functionality? I was going to guess "waking up to my music", but the speakers are muted. Unless you mean the computer speakers are muted, so the wake-up light plays the bluetooth-to-fm of your playlist, in which case, cool.

I presume the computer isn't in their bedroom, so they're using this as a clever way to pipe the music from where their computer is to where their alarm is...

ucim wrote:My favorite bodge was putting an 8 bit memory card in a 16 bit computer (or was it a 16 in a 32, I forget)... because of the bit mismatch, the memory was slow, but windows insisted on managing the memory itself, slowing the entire computer down. So, I assigned it all to a ram disk, and then put my swap file on that ram disk. So I had memory pretending to be a hard drive pretending to be memory. Made a world of difference in the computer speed.

So, essentially telling the computer "this is still memory, but use it with much lower priority than the other memory"... neat.