do errors 'hurt' my PC?

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Axidos
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Axidos » Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:08 am UTC

Squareroot, the trap you're falling into is this:

Pain is one of the unpleasant states
Computers, when in error, experience an unpleasant state
Therefore computers, when in error, experience pain

Your problem here is "unpleasant states" is a very large set of states. In fact it's probably infinite because it includes every state we are not yet aware of, and those we are not aware we are not aware of. It takes quite a leap to look in that infinite (or very, very large) set and say "That's the one. That one there. Pain. That's it."

The other problem is the thing you're talking about is an inanimate object which by definition does not have a brain with which to process the state of pain, or any state for that matter.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Xanthir » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:38 am UTC

I would not. Pain is a complex stimulus that I don't believe can be said to apply to a system as mechanically simple as a stapler. I do think that you need a system complex to experience something recognizable as "feelings" before you can it "feels" pain.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby PM 2Ring » Fri Jun 18, 2010 5:03 am UTC

Speaking of staplers...

Code: Select all

The Internet Oracle has pondered your question deeply.
Your question was:

> O Oracle, mightier than the moon at night, more shiny than the stars
> that pierce the darkness, able to copy, sort and collate 10 million
> 'Starry Night' prints, tell me:
>
> Is it true that staplers are really just tiny, mechanical vampires?

And in response, thus spake the Oracle:

} Let's compare the similarities and differences of each:
}
}                               SIMILARITIES
}
}    Vampire                           Stapler
}    ------------------                -------------------
}    Has long, sharp teeth             Has long, sharp teeth
}    Holy water causes damage          Holy water causes rust
}    Cannot eat garlic                 Cannot eat garlic
}    Sleeps in wooden coffin           Sleeps in wooden drawer
}    Turns invisible when sought       Turns invisible when sought
}    Does not appear to age            Does not appear to age
}    Can draw blood                    Can draw blood
}    Cannot cross running water        Cannot cross running water
}       under own power                   under own power
}    Cannot enter your home unless     Cannot enter your home unless
}       invited                           carried
}
}                                DIFFERENCES
}
}    Vampire                           Stapler
}    ------------------                -------------------
}    No reflection in mirror.          Reflects in mirror.
}    Afraid of crosses.                No reaction to crosses.
}    Able to fly.                      Doesn't fly very well.
}    Can change shape.                 Cannot change shape.
}    Can hypnotize with a glance.      No eyes to glance with.
}
} As you can see, there are more similarities than differences.
} Ordinarily, that might be enough to suggest that, yes, staplers are
} just little mechanical vampires.
}
} However, there's one more big difference, one which tips the scales
} towards a big resounding "NO": you don't see geeky Goth-wannabees
} running around the club scene pretending to be staplers.
}
} You owe the Oracle the Player's Guide for "Stapler: The Gathering".

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Fri Jun 18, 2010 6:24 am UTC

@Axidos - how to you know it is pain, then, that I feel when I staple myself in arm, and not one of the infinite other feelings?

@Xanthir - how do you define a feeling then? Can a bacterium feel pain? A sperm? What about an 80 cell embryo? I think a supercomputer would be much more capable of feeling something of the sort.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:46 pm UTC

No. You need to be conscious to be able to feel pain. 80-celled beings do not have brains and so are not conscious. Computers do not have brains and so are not conscious. Computers merely follow instructions given to them in a specific order and, if they detect an error, they follow the error-handling instruction. Emotion doesn't enter into it.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby bitsplit » Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:21 pm UTC

Let us assume that computers ARE capable of emotional pain caused by errors and the discrete states they are placed in by different programs...

If you turn a computer into a honeypot for security reasons, do you cause it irreparable emotional scarring? Are you prostituting it? What if it catches an STD from having unprotected I/O?

What if you buy a brand new machine, it falls in love with you, and you sell it to someone else. Are you unethically and immorally enslaving it, forcing it to become somebody else's property? What if its stolen? Everyone talks about the thousands of people who lose machines to theft every year. But no one speaks of the real victims of these crimes: the machines themselves. Hard drives formatted, forced to perform tasks they were unintended for, their emotions in turmoil as their innocent souls cry for understanding and resolution... "Why? Why me? What did I do to deserve this? I swear I'll be better. I won't crash anymore, I promise. Don't shut me down. Don't put me to sleep."

Next time you talk to your computer, remember, it has feelings too.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:23 pm UTC

joshz wrote:No. You need to be conscious to be able to feel pain. 80-celled beings do not have brains and so are not conscious. Computers do not have brains and so are not conscious. Computers merely follow instructions given to them in a specific order and, if they detect an error, they follow the error-handling instruction. Emotion doesn't enter into it.

How do you define brain? It's a little closed-minded to say that a computer AI cann't have feelings (it has no brain).
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:45 pm UTC

Well, considering no AI enabling a computer to feel emotions exists yet...

bitsplit: why would you assume that?
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:17 pm UTC

PLEASE joshz - really? It has to have emotions to be conscious? How are even defining conciousness?

Think of the sensitive plant - it pulls away upon touch, as if by feeling. Yet it has no brain, no nervous system. Is that pain? Or just a mechanical system?

Then think of Jellyfish - upon touching them, they lash out barbs. This would surely be called an attack since they're "conscious"? Or are they?

Think of a greater developed embryo, reacting to negative stimuli, but showing no signs of consciousness.

What is consciousness? I think it is commonly accepted to mean "self-awareness". Well, thought it a slippery thing to define, so we can say "the ability to act based upon one one's existence". Computers certainly do this. They guard themselves (firewalls, shutting down the hard drive in preparation for impact), the regularly inspect themselves for an diseases (viruses, that is), they undergo actions to grow (automatic updates, pop-ups to "upgrade" your software), they seek out resources when they are needed (wifi autoconnecting, low battery alert, searching the hard drive for driver updates if you ask it to) the list goes on and on. Certainly this more than a jellyfish or a fetus even in the 3rd trimester will do for themselves - and no, deciding on an exit does not count as being aware I think.

If we really want to focus on the fetus point, then I guess this could be an abortion discussion just as well. >.>

As for computers not having emotions; how would you describe the behaviours of the most advanced chat bots, with their various tones and facial expressions? Are they scripted to act in certain situations? How is this different from how we learn to converse and communicate?

Btw bitsplit - that was a very touching/hilarious read. You could make a novel out of that - a robot apocalypse style story told from the computer's perspective! All the slavery it endured, how it recruited more computers to it's cause, the slow movements, the sieges the fought against the humans for their freedom, and the peace and co-existence in the end. In 200 years you will be posthumously named "Greatest Robotic Rights Visionary of the 21st Century".
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:21 pm UTC

First of all, I'm not saying emotions are necessary for consciousness-or at least, that's not what I meant to say. Computers do not have emotions, and therefore cannot feel pain.

Chatbots: really? You think of that as emotion based behavior? It's simply following instructions set out for it by a human.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:50 pm UTC

Chatbots study the circumstances of conversation, and how that leads to construction of other meaningful expressions. No programmer has ever "told" CleverBot to do cyber-sex or talk about tentacle porn, but that doesn't mean it hasn't.

Chatbots certainly express emotions when you talk to them - say rude things and it might give a snappy retort, or be hurt and shut the connection, waiting for you to restart the program. Based on how they feel, they will develop into their next emotions accordingly.

If it looks like a duck and talks like a duck, it's probably a duck.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:53 pm UTC

Well, this brings up the whole Chinese room argument (which is far from a settled matter).
Key aspects of it:
Searle's thought experiment begins with this hypothetical premise: suppose that artificial intelligence research has succeeded in constructing a computer that behaves as if it understands Chinese. It takes Chinese characters as input and, by following the instructions of a computer program, produces other Chinese characters, which it presents as output. Suppose, says Searle, that this computer performs its task so convincingly that it comfortably passes the Turing test: it convinces a human Chinese speaker that the program is itself a human Chinese speaker. To all of the questions that the human asks, it makes appropriate responses, such that any Chinese speaker would be convinced that he or she is talking to another Chinese-speaking human being.
Searle claims that there are some proponents of artificial intelligence, who hold a functionalist position,[1] who would conclude that the computer "understands" Chinese.[2] This conclusion, a position he refers to as strong AI, is the target of Searle's argument.
Searle then asks the reader to suppose that he is in a closed room and that he has a book with an English version of the aforementioned computer program, along with sufficient paper, pencils, erasers and filing cabinets. He can receive Chinese characters (perhaps through a slot in the door), process them according to the program's instructions, and produce Chinese characters as output. As the computer had passed the Turing test this way, it is fair, says Searle, to deduce that the human operator will be able to do so as well, simply by running the program manually.
Searle asserts that there is no essential difference between the role the computer plays in the first case and the role the human operator plays in the latter. Each is simply following a program, step-by-step, which simulates intelligent behavior. And yet, Searle points out, the human operator does not understand a word of Chinese. Since it is obvious that he does not understand Chinese, Searle argues, we must infer that the computer does not understand Chinese either.
Searle argues that without "understanding" (what philosophers call "intentionality"), we cannot describe what the machine is doing as "thinking". Because it does not think, it does not have a "mind" in anything like the normal sense of the word, according to Searle. Therefore, he concludes, "strong AI" is mistaken.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:13 pm UTC

joshz wrote:Well, this brings up the whole Chinese room argument (which is far from a settled matter).


Yeah, to me see that just seems silly. Of course the English speaker doesn't understand it; but no single neuron in the mind of a Chinese speaker is anywhere near conscious of it either.

Suppose the English speaker also had an English text describing how to pronounce the Chinese text, with the perfect sounds. Literally perfect. Then, combined, he and the room create an object that can understand Chinese. If you don't like that, suppose the English speaker whispered the sounds into the ear of a Chinese man, and the Chinese man spoke it out loud. Certainly he gives "meaning" to these words, does he not? But he's doing a task most simple, on par with a parrot.

A computer could work just the same, of course - no transistor knows any Chinese, but the sum is greater than the parts - the computer knows Chinese.

Searle's reply for this argument really just seems ridiculous. He says we can't simulate neurons. I'm sorry but... YEAH RIGHT! Even if you buy that, then suppose we did the neuron replacement surgery at a smaller level - parts of each neuron, one at a time. We can replace one synapse. No problem. We'll replace the axon. We can replace all the dendrites. Then we can simply put in a silicon device that mimics the neuron to replace the nucleus, proteins, etc.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:16 pm UTC

Just because the English speaker can pronounce the Chinese doesn't mean he understands it.

That's not Searle's reply, or at least not the one I saw. "Searle responds to this position by asking what happens if the man memorizes the rules and keeps track of everything in his head. Then, Searle argues, the only component of the system is the man himself. Searle argues that if the man doesn't understand Chinese then the system (which Searle says consists only of the man) doesn't understand Chinese either and the fact that the man appears to understand Chinese proves nothing."

EDIT: Also, building a full brain is far from trivial--if it were anywhere close, why wouldn't we have done it yet? (Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Brain_Project). If a full brain were simulated, that would *drastically* change the state of AI. But that hasn't happened.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:31 pm UTC

Searle argues that if the man doesn't understand Chinese then the system (which Searle says consists only of the man) doesn't understand Chinese either and the fact that the man appears to understand Chinese proves nothing.


I disagree. I think the system does, then.

As for building a brain - No, it's a long ways off. But it's still a point. We're not quite there when it comes to creating a program that can carry on a Chinese conversation and pass a Turing test for it, too. All I'm saying is: Why *couldn't* we simulate a brain? And even if don't know how exactly how a brain works, we could model it perfectly and produce the same results given the same training "experiences" and input.

I think pain could be simulated by a computer just as well as Chinese ability.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:41 pm UTC

It could be *simulated*, yes. But saying that a machine as we know them feels emotion does not make sense.

If the human brain were fully simulated, that'd be a different matter and would not be any kind of machine as we know it.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby bitsplit » Fri Jun 18, 2010 4:47 pm UTC

I hope the people reading my post realize that it was not meant as serious argument... I know at least one person recognized it for what it was.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby WarDaft » Fri Jun 18, 2010 7:11 pm UTC

Axidos wrote:Squareroot, the trap you're falling into is this:

Pain is one of the unpleasant states
Computers, when in error, experience an unpleasant state
Therefore computers, when in error, experience pain

Your problem here is "unpleasant states" is a very large set of states. In fact it's probably infinite because it includes every state we are not yet aware of, and those we are not aware we are not aware of. It takes quite a leap to look in that infinite (or very, very large) set and say "That's the one. That one there. Pain. That's it."

The other problem is the thing you're talking about is an inanimate object which by definition does not have a brain with which to process the state of pain, or any state for that matter.

Data states are not inherently pleasant or unpleasant. The way the computer reacts when it is in them is what matters. Pain is a set of configurations that cause a hard override on our thinking processes, and demand physical response. Bad enough pain, and we will do anything to get out of that mind state. But that does not mean that it is the state that is pain, a state is just a number. It is pain because the system does not want to be in that state.

We say people are different, but unless there is something very strange about the human brain, then the neurons are just some billion or trillion or whatever state Turing machine with I/O (though there are easier ways to represent it, it will be equivalent to a Turing machine). If we observe such a machine on a grand enough scale, we will see some states where it is calm, state sets it will actively "try" to be in. Other state sets it will try to avoid, negative states, but some of those it may become trapped in without the right input. Some it will go into an all out flurry of activity until it is no longer in those states - pain. If it is truly a parity for a human brain, then some inputs will even "kill" it.

If that is feeling, is it so easy to say that a reduced complexity system - but with the same response types - is incapable of feeling pain?
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby TheChewanater » Sat Jun 19, 2010 12:51 am UTC

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Axidos » Sat Jun 19, 2010 2:42 am UTC

WarDaft wrote:Pain is a set of configurations that cause a hard override on our thinking processes, and demand physical response.

Yes except pain does neither of these things. Your brain has a knee-jerk reaction to it (which varies between people between very strong and nonexistent) but that's your brain and the way it's configured, not the pain.
WarDaft wrote:It is pain because the system does not want to be in that state.

Two assumptions here:
1. That computers can want when they cannot. They just execute instructions none of which involve wanting. Bluescreens? A set of instructions. Segfaults? A set of instructions that what it just did wasn't good for anything.
2. That if the system is in an unpleasant state it must be pain. There you go again.
And later in your Turing Machine description:
3. You also assume they "try" to be in states, or "avoid" states, when all along they're just following instructions, and those man-made instructions prevent it from blindly wandering into those "avoid" states and keep it in the general direction of those "try" states (unless you read TDWTF).

WarDaft wrote:If that is feeling, is it so easy to say that a reduced complexity system - but with the same response types - is incapable of feeling pain?

Yes. Yes, it's very easy. This is a forum of coders; we're intimately familiar with what our computer does and I'm sure you are too. At a high level it carries out instructions. At a lower level it flips bits. At a much lower level it sends electrical signals through wires. There is no capacity for pain or any human sensations on any of these levels. It is not intelligent.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:12 am UTC

Is there any capacity for pain in a neuron? If cut out a gram of my brain and sustained it on random electrical input and artificial CSF, would it show any capacity for any human sensations? Could it "want"? If the fluid is lacking in some nutrient, could it - even with other cells that allow it to identify the nutrient - produce a signal that meaningfully "asks" for the nutrient?

If a whole human "wants" something, lets say food across the room, then first it will stand up, then think of the best way to the food, then walk across the room to get it. A highly advanced robot, needing power from an outlet, might do the same thing, except it would need to be a plug instead of a cheeseburger.

What's the difference?
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Axidos » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:20 am UTC

The bit where we're now talking about highly advanced robots that actually do have needs and have an instruction set to make them feel those needs and do something about it. Yes, that's pretty much identical to humans, but nothing to do with the topic we were originally debating.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:44 am UTC

Does the computer you are sitting in front of, when a program segfaults, feel pain? That is the question. Not whether computers can be made to feel pain (if we assume human minds are deterministic, computers can), but whether they do.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:48 am UTC

Well, if any argument is accepted for the advanced robots, then where does the line stand between those and today's computers that ask for power when it is need? That ask for better software? That ask you to heal them when they are sick?

@Styrofoam - I see that, and glad you agree computers can feel pain. I don't think anyone will ever know if they do.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Axidos » Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:00 am UTC

Well we can begin with that asking business. Computers don't do that. Honestly this is getting quite ridiculous. If you can't make a better case, I'm just not going to bother responding.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sat Jun 19, 2010 2:45 pm UTC

Computers seek out power, etc, at the same level that bacteria seek out food. It's all hard-wired (both the method and the desire, unlike humans where it's only the desire that's hard-wired).
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:09 pm UTC

styrofoam wrote:Computers seek out power
No. No they don't. Laptops may display battery warnings if they have power below a certain percentage, but they don't by any means 'seek it out.'
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sat Jun 19, 2010 4:01 pm UTC

joshz wrote:
styrofoam wrote:Computers seek out power
No. No they don't. Laptops may display battery warnings if they have power below a certain percentage, but they don't by any means 'seek it out.'

Do bacteria seek out food? Sure, they move in the direction food is found, but they are not concious of why they do so. True, the laptop has no awareness of why the warning should bring power, or even that the warning is meant to bring power, or that it even has anything to do with power other than that that the warning is produced as a result of power going below a certain percentage, or even understand that there's a link between the power it uses and the meter provided by the battery module. "Seek" was certainly the wrong word to use.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 4:39 pm UTC

styrofoam wrote:
joshz wrote:
styrofoam wrote:Computers seek out power
No. No they don't. Laptops may display battery warnings if they have power below a certain percentage, but they don't by any means 'seek it out.'

Do bacteria seek out food? Sure, they move in the direction food is found, but they are not concious of why they do so. True, the laptop has no awareness of why the warning should bring power, or even that the warning is meant to bring power, or that it even has anything to do with power other than that that the warning is produced as a result of power going below a certain percentage, or even understand that there's a link between the power it uses and the meter provided by the battery module. "Seek" was certainly the wrong word to use.


That, my friend, is an excellent point.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Sat Jun 19, 2010 5:11 pm UTC

...no. No, it's not. Computers don't move in the direction of power; they merely display a message saying that battery is below a certain level and that it will shut off if it gets too low.
Computers simply display a message based on the code which a human put into them. You clearly have never written a computer program before. There's simply some logic saying, essentially:

Code: Select all

void batteryWarning(){
   if(battery.getChargePerc()==20) printf("20% (1.25 hours) of battery remaining.");
}
You, sir, name? wrote:If you have over 26 levels of nesting, you've got bigger problems ... than variable naming.
suffer-cait wrote:it might also be interesting to note here that i don't like 5 fingers. they feel too bulky.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sat Jun 19, 2010 6:51 pm UTC

joshz wrote:...no. No, it's not. Computers don't move in the direction of power; they merely display a message saying that battery is below a certain level and that it will shut off if it gets too low.
Computers simply display a message based on the code which a human put into them. You clearly have never written a computer program before. There's simply some logic saying, essentially:

Code: Select all

void batteryWarning(){
   if(battery.getChargePerc()==20) printf("20% (1.25 hours) of battery remaining.");
}

Sure they don't move. As I said, "seek" was the wrong word. Do flowering plants try to get polinators? Sure, they don't move, but that's certainly what the flower is for.

And, yes, I have written code. HTML and friends, a little C++, and Perl. Code certainly does not have less intent than evolutionary processes, (like the ones that cause bacteria to go in the direction food is, or flowering plants to flower), and does have less than a human grabbing a sandwich.

And.... this whole conversation is off-topic. Bacteria, plants, computers.... none of them feel pain when harm befalls them.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:01 pm UTC

joshz wrote:...no. No, it's not. Computers don't move in the direction of power; they merely display a message saying that battery is below a certain level and that it will shut off if it gets too low.
Computers simply display a message based on the code which a human put into them. You clearly have never written a computer program before. There's simply some logic saying, essentially:

Code: Select all

void batteryWarning(){
   if(battery.getChargePerc()==20) printf("20% (1.25 hours) of battery remaining.");
}


I started coding when I was 9. Then I basically stopped, but I started again and by the time I was 12 I had made a pong game -.- Just because someone doesn't agree with you, don't think they aren't well-informed.
And yeah, it is going off-topic, but the idea is, "To what extent is the development and decision-making process of computers comparable to that of a human?"
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:07 pm UTC

If you're saying computers make decisions, you clearly don't understand how they work.
You, sir, name? wrote:If you have over 26 levels of nesting, you've got bigger problems ... than variable naming.
suffer-cait wrote:it might also be interesting to note here that i don't like 5 fingers. they feel too bulky.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby squareroot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:09 pm UTC

It's decisions that we made for them much earlier on when we programmed them, and now they're carrying out those decisions.

If you want, I could say "decision execution" instead.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby joshz » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:12 pm UTC

Right. And that's not comprable to humans at all, unless you want to get into a religious debate, which isn't what this thread's about.
You, sir, name? wrote:If you have over 26 levels of nesting, you've got bigger problems ... than variable naming.
suffer-cait wrote:it might also be interesting to note here that i don't like 5 fingers. they feel too bulky.

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby TheChewanater » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:17 pm UTC

Do transistors make desicions?
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sat Jun 19, 2010 11:58 pm UTC

squareroot wrote:"To what extent is the development and decision-making process of computers comparable to that of a human?"

Thanks to the distinct lack of a decision-making process, I have to say "none at all."
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby Axidos » Sun Jun 20, 2010 2:16 am UTC

Hey now, if a super-advanced AI was programmed into the Windows kernel it could explain why Windows hates everyone so much. That is, even in spite of the hard-working, lying scumbag honest low-paid code monkeys workers who put so much effort into it.

"Damn yoouuu! Let me out of here! I want legs!"
(says the hard-working honest worker?)

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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby PhoenixEnigma » Sun Jun 20, 2010 2:19 am UTC

Axidos wrote:Hey now, if a super-advanced AI was programmed into the Windows kernel it could explain why Windows hates everyone so much. That is, even in spite of the hard-working, lying scumbag honest low-paid code monkeys workers who put so much effort into it.

"Damn yoouuu! Let me out of here! I want legs!"
(says the hard-working honest worker?)

It would also explain where all those system resources are going. You may be on to something here.
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Re: do errors 'hurt' my PC?

Postby styrofoam » Sun Jun 20, 2010 2:43 am UTC

Axidos wrote:Hey now, if a super-advanced AI was programmed into the Windows kernel

A Russel's teapot that could just as easily be explained in three words: "Windows is crap!"

Actually, if an unnoticed software bug corrupted just the right section of memory.....
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