Structure of a Maths Lesson...

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snowfun87
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Structure of a Maths Lesson...

Postby snowfun87 » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:39 pm UTC

Hi

I'm looking for some new ideas on changing the structure of my lessons. I'm interested in finding out what other maths teachers use as their 'stock' lesson. Anyone like to share? Mine tends to be: Starter, Learning Objectives, explainy bit, paired activity, individual activity, review. I'd like to try something else though. Anyone got anything a little different?
Last edited by snowfun87 on Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:11 am UTC, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: Structure of a Maths Lesson...

Postby doogly » Sun Oct 22, 2017 12:43 am UTC

What topic and level are you teaching?
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Re: Structure of a Maths Lesson...

Postby Repeekthgil » Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:49 pm UTC

I'm a high school teacher, and my lessons tend to go similarly to yours. I probably don't make my students work enough individually, but that's mostly b/c as soon as they are given any freedom they go very much off task...

I just got back from a math teacher conference this weekend and it's energized me to try to change up my teaching practices. One big thing that was stressed was to try to bring much more "why" instead of "how" into teaching about a topic. I'm still unsure of how to bring that into every topic, and I think I do a good job of fostering "why" with interesting word problems, but I could probably do better. I also teach Algebra 2 which once you get into quadratics it becomes tricky to keep things natural without bringing physics into things and that excites some kids but turns off even more...

The biggest thing I took away had to do with homework. The presenter was arguing for a 2-4-2 homework process. 2 good questions about the lesson. That's usually enough for the students to find the problems with their thinking. Then 4 questions of spiral review. 1 from yesterday, 1 from last week, 1 from last month and 1 from last year. Pull these from standardized tests? And lastly, 2 questions that are interesting. He wasn't really clear on what these should be, but I imagine they'd be brain teasers or sudoku or something. It's an interesting approach.

Lastly, what length are your classes? I teach 80 minute blocks, so maybe make it 3-5-2 for every other day homework...
I'm not sure this answered your question....

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Re: Structure of a Maths Lesson...

Postby ConMan » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:50 pm UTC

Repeekthgil wrote:The biggest thing I took away had to do with homework. The presenter was arguing for a 2-4-2 homework process. 2 good questions about the lesson. That's usually enough for the students to find the problems with their thinking. Then 4 questions of spiral review. 1 from yesterday, 1 from last week, 1 from last month and 1 from last year. Pull these from standardized tests? And lastly, 2 questions that are interesting. He wasn't really clear on what these should be, but I imagine they'd be brain teasers or sudoku or something. It's an interesting approach.

I think that using those last couple of questions to help students exercise their problem solving skills is good. The final exams for maths in my high school days always ended with a question that didn't use much of the course content, but which led you through some kind of interesting derivation. For example, a proof that 1! + 1/2! + 1/3! + ... = e. It was broken down into steps, and some of the steps were pretty standard "prove this equality", but there was usually a little leap of logic in the last step where you used all of the previous results to get the final answer.

For class review quizzes, you probably don't want to be doing such grand things, but something that's more about mathematical and logical thinking than blindly applying the known formulas is a good thing.
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