Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

For the discussion of math. Duh.

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njperrone
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Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby njperrone » Thu Dec 03, 2009 4:22 am UTC

I want to purchase a textbook about Abstract Algebra. How rigorous the text is does not matter as long as having taken an introductory Linear Algebra course is enough for it, which I have. I am just looking to learn about abstract algebra as soon as possible because my linear algebra course introduced the theory of groups, very basically though, and I have been extremely interested in it ever since.

So I am looking for a rigorous abstract algebra textbook that is good for undergraduates. I also do not have much experience in set theory, and from a lot of the comments I have read about different textbooks they said that set theory was covered in the indexes they have. I do not know if this is a requirement to have known, or just helps ease the process of learning abstract algebra.

So mathematical rigor and indexes are prefered if it is possible. And I would also like it to contain a fair amount of problems, but solutions to the problems arent necessary. I hope you can give me a great suggestion about a specific one.

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Dason
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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby Dason » Thu Dec 03, 2009 4:39 am UTC

In my undergraduate abstract class I used Joe Gallian's book "Contemporary Abstract Algebra". I enjoyed it and thought he did a good job of explaining everything pretty well. It's the only book I've ever encountered so I can't really compare it to anything else but I can say that I did think it was pretty good.
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skeptical scientist
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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby skeptical scientist » Thu Dec 03, 2009 4:50 am UTC

I think Artin's book is fairly popular. I have no personal opinion on the matter.
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Briareos
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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby Briareos » Thu Dec 03, 2009 5:15 am UTC

I used Dummit and Foote and found it quite readable.
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Lycur
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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby Lycur » Thu Dec 03, 2009 5:53 am UTC

I used Dummit and Foote when I learned groups and rings, it doesn't assume much knowledge coming in and it's quite reasonable but somehow it didn't really make me appreciate the subject. It provides a ton of detail which, unfortunately, I found often obfuscated the very natural ideas that were being introduced. When I studied Galois theory I switched to this book which is rather terse, but I found it alot easier to see the forest without so many trees in the way.

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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby doogly » Thu Dec 03, 2009 2:10 pm UTC

I loved Artin's book, much love from me.
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MidsizeBlowfish
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Re: Im looking for suggestions for textbooks.

Postby MidsizeBlowfish » Thu Dec 03, 2009 4:18 pm UTC

I'm a big fan of Beachy and Blair's Abstract Algebra for undergrad algebra. It starts off quite gently but covers a fair amount.


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