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What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 5:11 pm UTC
by scratch123
I think it is combitorial game theory. The games in combitorial game theory are much more interesting than the ones is game theory yet game theory is more popular. This is probably because it has more real world applications. In fact I don't even know any real world applications to combitorial game theory unless you count playing a board game well counts as a real world application.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 6:57 pm UTC
by skullturf
I say this not to be a dick, but to help you avoid possible embarrassment in the future: the word is "combinatorial", not "combitorial".

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 8:23 pm UTC
by heyitsguay
Oh, you again.

I'm gonna go with "literary criticism".

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:13 pm UTC
by Xanthir
You kidding? Litcrit people get all the chicks.

The answer is clearly baseball. You would not *believe* how hard it is to get a math professor to even admit that it's an area of math!

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:41 pm UTC
by heyitsguay
Eh, in my experience, they just need to see the applications. Hit a prof a few times with a bat and they start agreeing with you.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:25 pm UTC
by Timefly
Baseball dates back to Euclid.

- A bat can be swung between any two points.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:40 pm UTC
by heyitsguay
Baseball theory didn't get interesting until theorists abandoned the parallel postulate, though.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:03 am UTC
by notzeb
Some contenders:

- The Umbral Calculus
- Tauberian Theorems
- Arakelov Theory
- Fewnomial Theory
- Functional Equations
- Tropical Geometry
- Sieve Theory
- Sturmian Words
- Dessins d'enfants
- Bubbles

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Thu Nov 10, 2011 11:08 pm UTC
by MHD
notzeb wrote:Some contenders:

- The Umbral Calculus
- Tauberian Theorems
- Arakelov Theory
- Fewnomial Theory
- Functional Equations
- Tropical Geometry
- Sieve Theory
- Sturmian Words
- Dessins d'enfants
- Bubbles


All of these are insanely cool.

I especially like Functional Equations, they might revolutionize Functional Programming the same way Monads did.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:45 am UTC
by amit28it
The most underrated area of math is
Diffrential equation , Integral calculus ................It's applications are used everywhere .

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:40 pm UTC
by Talith
How is calculus under-rated? Possibly the only other more appreciated area of mathematics when it comes to applications is statistics.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 9:42 pm UTC
by Anaximander
Hello. First post.

I'm probably not well-informed enough to make a claim on whether or not it's underrated, but I'm going to nominate Monte Carlo methods.

I had never heard much about Monte Carlo methods until I started using them. And then, when I started looking into the applications, I was amazed at the problem-solving and data analyzing possibilities. Plus, now that computers are stupid-cheap and crazy-fast, the available number of histories of repeated random samplings that can be run makes me salivate.

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:03 pm UTC
by dissonant
Game theory is certainly a respected area of mathematical research, and has its share of Fields medals and Nobel Prizes...

My vote is for determinantal calculus!

Re: What do you think the most underrated area of math is?

Posted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:39 am UTC
by Sagekilla
Riemann sums.

I mean seriously, depending on how you do it you can get such an underrated area (under the curve).