American solar eclipse

For the discussion of the sciences. Physics problems, chemistry equations, biology weirdness, it all goes here.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Zohar
COMMANDER PORN
Posts: 7501
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:45 pm UTC
Location: Denver

Re: American solar eclipse

Postby Zohar » Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:24 pm UTC

That's not the only reason - you don't normally see round sun images through leaves. The reason is shadows aren't usually sharp - the light from the sun comes from many different points and so the scattering of light is fuzzy as well. During an eclipse you get light from a much smaller area and so it's sharper.
Mighty Jalapeno: "See, Zohar agrees, and he's nice to people."
SecondTalon: "Still better looking than Jesus."

Not how I say my name

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5804
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: American solar eclipse

Postby sardia » Sun Aug 27, 2017 1:58 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:That's not the only reason - you don't normally see round sun images through leaves. The reason is shadows aren't usually sharp - the light from the sun comes from many different points and so the scattering of light is fuzzy as well. During an eclipse you get light from a much smaller area and so it's sharper.

I wondered why we don't get round shadows, thanks for the tidbit!

Is anyone going to Chile/Argentina for the next totality eclipse? There's a few cities to choose from(I am not going into the deep amazon just for an eclipse, or for any reason for that matter).

User avatar
Sungura
When life gives you banananas, make bananana bread
Posts: 3779
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:32 am UTC
Location: AL

Re: American solar eclipse

Postby Sungura » Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:41 pm UTC

Since someone asked for photos...
ImageTimelapse of Totality 2017 by Amata Hinkle, on Flickr

We had a few locations picked out for months, and then day of checked weather for best chance of fully clear skies. Worked out :) Near Spring City, TN is where we went. About 200yards off the path of max totality, so we had basically 2.5 minutes. And we saw the NASA planes that were eclipse chasing doing studies (such as microflares, which are best visible during the eclipse). :) Very low overhead right off the field. I sadly had my solar filter on my camera and couldn't get it off fast enough for a shot of them!

I did not have $200 for a proper solar filter for my Pentax K50. So I made one from the glasses. It worked beautifully, I only had a 50mm lens as my longest to use so I shot for a timelapse type photo rather than closeup. For 2024, I am getting a longer lens for sure!

If you didnt see totally - go see it in 2024. Everyone assumes it is a linear thing that 95 or 97% or whatever is "almost the same, good enough". NO. It is not anything *near* the same. I saw the 1994 Annular where it hit 94%, it was neat but NOTHING like 360-deg dusk, sunset, and then dark. It wasn't until the last milisecond that the light flashes (the "diamond ring"!) and goes. Seriously. Amazing breathtaking experience. Buy the cheap paper glasses, go see the full thing!

To me the corona looked tiny in person - I actually could not see it with my naked eye and am kinda sad about that but it turns out one of my shots captured it pretty well. The good images of the huge spread out corona streaks are 12+ image stacks (not found one that is less than 12, yet, just as that is the dynamic range you need!) I *could* see the solar prominences, which that was awesome. A prominence is a loop of gas trapped in the magnetic field. When it flips out it turns into a flare.
"Would you rather fight a Sungura-sized spider or 1000 spider-sized Sunguras?" -Zarq
she/her/they/snug/gender neutral

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5804
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: American solar eclipse

Postby sardia » Wed Aug 30, 2017 1:53 am UTC

Sungura wrote:Since someone asked for photos...
ImageTimelapse of Totality 2017 by Amata Hinkle, on Flickr

We had a few locations picked out for months, and then day of checked weather for best chance of fully clear skies. Worked out :) Near Spring City, TN is where we went. About 200yards off the path of max totality, so we had basically 2.5 minutes. And we saw the NASA planes that were eclipse chasing doing studies (such as microflares, which are best visible during the eclipse). :) Very low overhead right off the field. I sadly had my solar filter on my camera and couldn't get it off fast enough for a shot of them!

I did not have $200 for a proper solar filter for my Pentax K50. So I made one from the glasses. It worked beautifully, I only had a 50mm lens as my longest to use so I shot for a timelapse type photo rather than closeup. For 2024, I am getting a longer lens for sure!

If you didnt see totally - go see it in 2024. Everyone assumes it is a linear thing that 95 or 97% or whatever is "almost the same, good enough". NO. It is not anything *near* the same. I saw the 1994 Annular where it hit 94%, it was neat but NOTHING like 360-deg dusk, sunset, and then dark. It wasn't until the last milisecond that the light flashes (the "diamond ring"!) and goes. Seriously. Amazing breathtaking experience. Buy the cheap paper glasses, go see the full thing!

To me the corona looked tiny in person - I actually could not see it with my naked eye and am kinda sad about that but it turns out one of my shots captured it pretty well. The good images of the huge spread out corona streaks are 12+ image stacks (not found one that is less than 12, yet, just as that is the dynamic range you need!) I *could* see the solar prominences, which that was awesome. A prominence is a loop of gas trapped in the magnetic field. When it flips out it turns into a flare.

Now you're tempting me to fly to South America's eclipse next year.

User avatar
pogrmman
Posts: 323
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2016 10:53 pm UTC
Location: Probably outside

Re: American solar eclipse

Postby pogrmman » Sat Sep 02, 2017 9:11 pm UTC

sardia wrote:
Sungura wrote:Since someone asked for photos...
ImageTimelapse of Totality 2017 by Amata Hinkle, on Flickr

We had a few locations picked out for months, and then day of checked weather for best chance of fully clear skies. Worked out :) Near Spring City, TN is where we went. About 200yards off the path of max totality, so we had basically 2.5 minutes. And we saw the NASA planes that were eclipse chasing doing studies (such as microflares, which are best visible during the eclipse). :) Very low overhead right off the field. I sadly had my solar filter on my camera and couldn't get it off fast enough for a shot of them!

I did not have $200 for a proper solar filter for my Pentax K50. So I made one from the glasses. It worked beautifully, I only had a 50mm lens as my longest to use so I shot for a timelapse type photo rather than closeup. For 2024, I am getting a longer lens for sure!

If you didnt see totally - go see it in 2024. Everyone assumes it is a linear thing that 95 or 97% or whatever is "almost the same, good enough". NO. It is not anything *near* the same. I saw the 1994 Annular where it hit 94%, it was neat but NOTHING like 360-deg dusk, sunset, and then dark. It wasn't until the last milisecond that the light flashes (the "diamond ring"!) and goes. Seriously. Amazing breathtaking experience. Buy the cheap paper glasses, go see the full thing!

To me the corona looked tiny in person - I actually could not see it with my naked eye and am kinda sad about that but it turns out one of my shots captured it pretty well. The good images of the huge spread out corona streaks are 12+ image stacks (not found one that is less than 12, yet, just as that is the dynamic range you need!) I *could* see the solar prominences, which that was awesome. A prominence is a loop of gas trapped in the magnetic field. When it flips out it turns into a flare.

Now you're tempting me to fly to South America's eclipse next year.


You really should. At a minimum, plan to go see the 2024 eclipse. Seeing a total eclipse is incredible. It may seem crazy to travel far for a couple minutes of view, but it really is good enough that you should try and see at least one.

Unlike the poster you've quoted, it seemed like I could see more of the corona than most pictures captured. I could also see prominences, which was awesome.


Return to “Science”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 11 guests