Facepalm TV / Doing It Wrong

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Interactive Civilian
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Interactive Civilian » Fri Jun 26, 2009 4:48 am UTC

You, sir, name? wrote:
Zhatt wrote:I always groan at the typical scene where someone gets thrown out of an airlock into empty space and then they instantly freeze and get's covered in ice because space is apparently oh so very very cold.


That is really annoying. Blackbody radiation a ridiculously slow way to loose energy at such low temperatures (human temperatures). I think I did some calculations on just how long it would take to drop 37 degrees in space at some point, and it was order of magnitude days (maybe even weeks)

I'm not going to defend the "freeze instantly in space" types, but I can't help but wonder how much heat will be lost through evaporative cooling as any liquids on the surface of the skin immediately boil off. Maybe not enough to freeze a body solid, but perhaps enough to freeze-dry surface cells causing a bit of frostbite? just curious.
Zhatt wrote:They're beside the flipping Sun for goodness sake!
But they are also in the shadow of their ship. With no medium to conduct heat from the direct sunlight areas to the shadow areas, does their proximity to the sun really matter? Again, I'm not defending the "freeze instantly in space" types, but in the shadow of their ship (which, IIRC was designed to reflect on the front side, so it wouldn't be absorbing much to re-radiate into its own shadow as blackbody radiation), would it really be any different regardless of proximity to the sun?

Not defending the bad science. Just curious about the real physics of such a situation. :)
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby PoliteProgrammer » Fri Jun 26, 2009 7:10 am UTC

Carnildo wrote:
PoliteProgrammer wrote:I don't think this thread could be complete without mentioning that scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey (I think it was that movie anyway) where they cut power to the engines and the spaceship STOPS.

There's no scene like that in 2001.


Oh well, my mistake - I'll have to spend some time on Youtube trying to find the right movie; let you know if I find it.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Mother Superior » Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:34 am UTC

You, sir, name? wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
PoliteProgrammer wrote:I don't think this thread could be complete without mentioning that scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey (I think it was that movie anyway) where they cut power to the engines and the spaceship STOPS.

Newton fail right there.

Are you sure it was 2001? Usually Clarke knew what he was doing.


I think 2001 has a few mess-ups, but they are pretty rare -- in fact, exceedingly rare in comparison to most sci-fi.

Apart from the Earth not looking like the Earth (because at the time, they didn't know what the Earth looked like from space) the one I can think of involves zero gravity. There's a particular scene in the space garage of the Discovery where Bowman and Poole move as if in 1g, despite being outside the rotating gravity-section of the ship. Now, they're probably supposed to be using the same velcro floor/shoes combo that the stewardess used in the space plane earlier, but the actors are clearly just walking around normally. Also that giant moon lander is a bit silly, but ya know...

EDIT: Now that I think about it, they also sit down in the pod in said space garage.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby EricH » Fri Jun 26, 2009 2:13 pm UTC

Interactive Civilian wrote:I'm not going to defend the "freeze instantly in space" types, but I can't help but wonder how much heat will be lost through evaporative cooling as any liquids on the surface of the skin immediately boil off. Maybe not enough to freeze a body solid, but perhaps enough to freeze-dry surface cells causing a bit of frostbite? just curious.
Correct--any wet areas will rapidly become dry, frozen areas, as most of the liquid boils off, and the remainder freezes. As heat is conducted from warmer areas of the body, the surface ice will sublimate, until it's gone. (or until the body is too cool--but a human isn't moist enough on the surface to make that happen. Maybe inside the lungs or something...) After the corpse is dry, any further cooling will be radiative, so the rate will only depend on reflectivity and other heat sources.

Interactive Civilian wrote:
Zhatt wrote:They're beside the flipping Sun for goodness sake!
But they are also in the shadow of their ship. With no medium to conduct heat from the direct sunlight areas to the shadow areas, does their proximity to the sun really matter? Again, I'm not defending the "freeze instantly in space" types, but in the shadow of their ship (which, IIRC was designed to reflect on the front side, so it wouldn't be absorbing much to re-radiate into its own shadow as blackbody radiation), would it really be any different regardless of proximity to the sun?

Not defending the bad science. Just curious about the real physics of such a situation. :)
Yep, in the ship's shadow, proximity to the Sun doesn't matter. If the ship's surface is reflective, then it will couple poorly (in a thermal sense) with the victim floating nearby. So the body can be treated almost as though neither sun nor ship were present.
I shouldn't just give you the fish--let me teach you to fish, so you can answer this kind of question for yourself:
One reasonably good way to consider radiative thermal transfer in these hypothetical situations is to put your point of view at the body in question (in this case, the corpse), and look around in all directions (a ray-tracing algorithm, for graphics geeks), then measure the temperature of everything you see. In this case you'll see stars, empty space, and a spaceship, but not the Sun. Most of the area is empty space, at < 4K, which is plenty cold. Stars have a temperature of millions of degrees, but they take up a very small fraction of the total area you can see. The spaceship takes up a significant area, but since it's reflective, we don't measure its temperature, we measure whatever we see reflected in it, which again is mostly empty space. (If its albedo is 0.9, then we average 10% of the ship's temperature, and 90% of the reflected space) The victim could see his own reflection in the spaceship, so depending on its apparent size, that section of space appears to be at the same temperature as the body. Since we only care about the average temperature, not the fluctuations on every point as it cools, we can just average all those temperatures we can see, weighted by how much of the sky they take up, and say the body cools just as fast as if that were the uniform temperature in all directions. And that just comes down to the straightforward math for blackbody radiation.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Zhatt » Tue Jun 30, 2009 6:46 pm UTC

EricH wrote:Yep, in the ship's shadow, proximity to the Sun doesn't matter.


I'm not too sure about that. Wouldn't there be a point where plasma form the corona or solar wind start filling in behind the ship? I don't know how close they were to the sun at the point, but it seemed close enough that superheated gasses might become an issue.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby silent man » Wed Jul 01, 2009 7:01 pm UTC

Don't get me started on Sunshine. That film is just so wrong on every level.

- "How's the garden doing?" "Great, we already produced enough oxygen to last us all the way to the sun and back!"
a) That's not how it works.
b)i) If they can store enough oxygen for more than half the trip without any hint that the tanks may be getting full, why not simply fill them with oxygen in the first place and forget about the garden? Was there an oxygen shortage on earth?
ii)Plants don't make oxygen from nothing. In other words, they left earth carrying a huge load of CO2, only to convert it to oxygen as quickly as possible.
- Have a fire on board? Put it out by flooding the room with pure oxygen from pressurized containers.
Now I can almost understand why they wouldn't simply vent it to space. They may not be able to afford loosing the nitrogen, but you can't tell me that a ship that is filled with that many luxuries had no room for a fire extinguishing system. Hell, they could have used their CO2-stores for oxygen-making.
Also, I don't remember if it was explained in the movie, but that "garden" was pretty much a jungle. How does something that moist catch fire anyway?

There are also some non-science face-palms in the movie, the most glaring of which was physicist-dude.
On a ship that doesn't seem to have a particularly rigid upper limit for crew-size and in a crew of six (eight? I forgot), there is exactly ONE person who can operate the device that is the entire point of the mission, namely saving humanity. Maybe it's just me, but I would appreciate a little more redundancy in that position. ("Yea, we got into position just fine, but the guy who could actually do the job we had been sent to do slipped on the ladder and broke his neck, so we had to come back and get someone else.")
And then, when there's some dangerous EVA to do that isn't even his specialty or, as I recall, his job, who do they send out?

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby sgt york » Wed Jul 01, 2009 8:28 pm UTC

Mother Superior wrote:Apart from the Earth not looking like the Earth (because at the time, they didn't know what the Earth looked like from space)

2001 was released in 1968. If you mean "from orbit", this was after Mercury and Gemini. Apollo 8 was launched that same year. There was several people who knew firsthand what Earth looked like from orbit, and there were thousands of pictures.

And if you mean "from space", there had already been well over a dozen probes sent to the moon by the US, each equipped with cameras. I find it hard to believe that nobody said "Hey, let's turn that sucker around and take a quick shot!"

To the subject at hand, though....Back when the X-Files was on, my wife and I were both research techs at Baylor. We loved the X-Files. In one episode, Scully extracted a DNA sample, prepped a custom made probe, and ran a Southern blot in a single afternoon. We laughed our asses off. People were actually discussing it in the lab the next day. We all decided we should hire her (for a variety of reasons....).

Fringe is so full of biology nonsense that I just accept it as fantasy. From a cold virus that somehow grows to about a half a meter, to making the skin seal up by overexpressing whatever it was they said got overexpressed, to having some dude morph into a monster that seems to have more mass than he did originally...I just have to tell my brain to sit down, shut up, and enjoy the ride.

OH...Ironman. Yeah, with the physics of it all, this is just trivial, but it really bugged me that he was OK after slamming into desert sands from high altitude. Even if the suit could withstand it, he'd be a puddle inside it.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby run.dll » Thu Jul 02, 2009 1:18 am UTC

I recall watching a drama on CBC TV a few years back which had an unbelievably stupid special effect. It was a slow motion view from the rear of a bullet moving towards a person (a la Matrix). The only problem was that the entire cartridge, including the jacket, was shown. How many people in the production/editing crew had to miss this by the time it actually went to air?
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Charlie! » Thu Jul 02, 2009 1:20 am UTC

sgt york wrote:OH...Ironman. Yeah, with the physics of it all, this is just trivial, but it really bugged me that he was OK after slamming into desert sands from high altitude. Even if the suit could withstand it, he'd be a puddle inside it.

Inertial compensators.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Carnildo » Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:42 am UTC

sgt york wrote:
Mother Superior wrote:Apart from the Earth not looking like the Earth (because at the time, they didn't know what the Earth looked like from space)

2001 was released in 1968. If you mean "from orbit", this was after Mercury and Gemini. Apollo 8 was launched that same year. There was several people who knew firsthand what Earth looked like from orbit, and there were thousands of pictures.

From orbit, yes, but that doesn't give you a good idea of what the Earth as a whole looks like: from 150 miles up, it's only a thousand miles to the horizon, letting you see about 1% of the surface.

2001 was released in April of 1968. At that time, nobody had ever seen an entire hemisphere of Earth (Apollo 8 wasn't launched until December). I think the earliest Soviet probe to photograph a large part of the Earth was Zond 5 (September of 1968); the only US photographs I can find from before that were a pair of low-quality images of a crescent Earth taken in 1966 by Lunar Orbiter 1.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby SummerGlauFan » Thu Jul 02, 2009 7:05 am UTC

Any movie/tv show where someone has a "laser" that shoots out bolts that you can see traveling. They should be going lightspeed, so even if you could see it, it would be a beam, not an "x-distance-long" bolt, and it would hit it's target more or less* instantly.

There was a Star Trek episode where a ship had lost it's inertial dampeners, some crewmember stated they were going a few hundred km/s, and then the ship pulls a 90 degree turn in about 1/4 a second. No one was a smear on the wall.

Last but certainly not least, there was also some crappy movie where a satellite had a microwave weapon. Apparently, when it was tested on a target in Europe, it managed to "stop the weather" (whatever the heck that means), plunging the area into a perpetual Ice-age. I doubt I will ever fully recover from watching that.

*depends on distance, but I really, really get annoyed when ships just a few kilometers apart "miss" with "lasers."
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Omegaton » Thu Jul 02, 2009 5:03 pm UTC

silent man wrote:Also, I don't remember if it was explained in the movie, but that "garden" was pretty much a jungle. How does something that moist catch fire anyway?

Slash-and-burn techniques are actually still in use in some tropical forests.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Zhatt » Thu Jul 02, 2009 5:59 pm UTC

run.dll wrote:The only problem was that the entire cartridge, including the jacket, was shown. How many people in the production/editing crew had to miss this by the time it actually went to air?


For me, I find it rare to find a slow-mo firefight that doesn't have entire cartridge intact after firing. I guess bullets just don't look like bullets to most viewers unless it has it's cartridge. It would look "wrong" to them.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby rho » Thu Jul 02, 2009 6:58 pm UTC

During the rooftop scene in The Matrix, an Agent fires a clip from a Desert Eagle at Neo who, famously, dodges each bullet in slow motion from ~25 feet away. Given a muzzle velocity of 1380 feet/second (the muzzle velocity of a desert eagle .50), and that the next round seems to be fired about when the first one passes Neo ~25 feet later, the semi-automatic handgun must be able to fire of a bullets at a rate of about 0.02 seconds per round - or 50 rounds per second - about 5 times faster than a typical assault rifle.
Even if the Agent can pull the trigger that fast the weapon shouldn't be able to keep up.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby You, sir, name? » Thu Jul 02, 2009 7:39 pm UTC

rho wrote:During the rooftop scene in The Matrix, an Agent fires a clip from a Desert Eagle at Neo who, famously, dodges each bullet in slow motion from ~25 feet away. Given a muzzle velocity of 1380 feet/second (the muzzle velocity of a desert eagle .50), and that the next round seems to be fired about when the first one passes Neo ~25 feet later, the semi-automatic handgun must be able to fire of a bullets at a rate of about 0.02 seconds per round - or 50 rounds per second - about 5 times faster than a typical assault rifle.
Even if the Agent can pull the trigger that fast the weapon shouldn't be able to keep up.


You can squeeze more ridiculousness out of that scene: The average speed of Neo's torso in this head is something like 500 mph (since he drops ~ 3 ft in the 30 ms it would take the bullet to reach him). So he accelerates to beyond 500 mph in dodging backwards, and then brakes his velocity with sheer uh... neo-voodoo. The acceleration in bringing someone from 0 to 500 mph in 15 ms is like 7000 G. Good luck with that, I say.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby sgt york » Thu Jul 02, 2009 7:52 pm UTC

You, sir, name? wrote:
rho wrote:During the rooftop scene in The Matrix, an Agent fires a clip from a Desert Eagle at Neo who, famously, dodges each bullet in slow motion from ~25 feet away. Given a muzzle velocity of 1380 feet/second (the muzzle velocity of a desert eagle .50), and that the next round seems to be fired about when the first one passes Neo ~25 feet later, the semi-automatic handgun must be able to fire of a bullets at a rate of about 0.02 seconds per round - or 50 rounds per second - about 5 times faster than a typical assault rifle.
Even if the Agent can pull the trigger that fast the weapon shouldn't be able to keep up.


You can squeeze more ridiculousness out of that scene: The average speed of Neo's torso in this head is something like 500 mph (since he drops ~ 3 ft in the 30 ms it would take the bullet to reach him). So he accelerates to beyond 500 mph in dodging backwards, and then brakes his velocity with sheer uh... neo-voodoo. The acceleration in bringing someone from 0 to 500 mph in 15 ms is like 7000 G. Good luck with that, I say.

The Matrix movies (IMHO) get a pass, though. Just like my character in FO3 can jump off a bridge to evade a small nuclear blast while getting shot square in the chest with a missile, then get up and kill everything in sight using a minigun that he has in a pack along with nine other projectile weapons, Neo can do whatever the hell he wants. Especially with the right cheat codes. Just do godmode & noclip and you're set.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:07 pm UTC

I haven't seen the sequels, but from what I remember, Neo's power basically equates to "I know the laws of physics aren't real, so I'm not going to follow them."
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Mr_Rose » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:43 pm UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:I haven't seen the sequels, but from what I remember, Neo's power basically equates to "I know the laws of physics aren't real, so I'm not going to follow them."
Which is also the Agents' power; basically both Neo and the Agent are cheating in a video game at that point, which is kinda why the resistance has never had much luck fighting the Agents before.
On the other hand, it's when Neo starts doing that sort of thing outside the Matrix that the series really starts to lose it...
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby TaintedDeity » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:45 pm UTC

Mr_Rose wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:I haven't seen the sequels, but from what I remember, Neo's power basically equates to "I know the laws of physics aren't real, so I'm not going to follow them."
Which is also the Agents' power; basically both Neo and the Agent are cheating in a video game at that point, which is kinda why the resistance has never had much luck fighting the Agents before.
On the other hand, it's when Neo starts doing that sort of thing outside the Matrix that the series really starts to lose it...
Yeeeah... seeing the code when he goes blind in real life?
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Mr_Rose » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:47 pm UTC

TaintedDeity wrote:
Mr_Rose wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:I haven't seen the sequels, but from what I remember, Neo's power basically equates to "I know the laws of physics aren't real, so I'm not going to follow them."
Which is also the Agents' power; basically both Neo and the Agent are cheating in a video game at that point, which is kinda why the resistance has never had much luck fighting the Agents before.
On the other hand, it's when Neo starts doing that sort of thing outside the Matrix that the series really starts to lose it...
Yeeeah... seeing the code when he goes blind in real life?
Why does that happen?

The way I figure it, what basically happens is that the Matrix randomly installs Wi-Fi in certain of the inmates; the first one to learn how to switch it on becomes "The One" in each cycle. :P
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Agent_Irons » Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:15 pm UTC

Charlie! wrote:
sgt york wrote:OH...Ironman. Yeah, with the physics of it all, this is just trivial, but it really bugged me that he was OK after slamming into desert sands from high altitude. Even if the suit could withstand it, he'd be a puddle inside it.

Inertial compensators.

Fun fact: the heart of a dragonfly is encased in a special fluid pocket of exactly the same density as the heart, which is fairly uniform in density itself. The upshot? Dragonflies can pull turns that require impossible g-forces without blacking out or having their heart fall out.

I read that somewhere.

Edit: I wish Iron Man had included an inertial compensator layer in the suit, because that would have been awesome. There would have been goo and bodysuits and suchlike.
Last edited by Agent_Irons on Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:35 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:24 pm UTC

Therefore, Tony Stark is a dragonfly.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby run.dll » Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:46 pm UTC

Agent_Irons wrote:I read that somewhere.


Good. I like posts with references :-)
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Cadmus » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:31 am UTC

Agent_Irons wrote:Edit: I wish Iron Man had included an inertial compensator layer in the suit, because that would have been awesome. There would have been goo and bodysuits and suchlike.


I'm pretty sure in the Ultimate line he's seen with goo and fluid on him as he exits a suit, I can't remember whether it's some sort of fluid layer or whether it's FBM too.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby SpitValve » Fri Jul 03, 2009 12:40 pm UTC

Cadmus wrote:
Agent_Irons wrote:Edit: I wish Iron Man had included an inertial compensator layer in the suit, because that would have been awesome. There would have been goo and bodysuits and suchlike.


I'm pretty sure in the Ultimate line he's seen with goo and fluid on him as he exits a suit, I can't remember whether it's some sort of fluid layer or whether it's FBM too.


His origin is given in Ultimate Iron Man. Yeah, there's goo, but it has a bad side effect of eating your skin. Ultimate Tony Stark was born with super regenerating tissue or something, so he's the only one who can wear it. (I think I recall he also has some sort of brain tissue throughout his own body or something, which aids his supergeniousness...)

They went in a quite a different direction for his origin story... not surprised they went with the 60s version for the movie :)

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Beacons! » Fri Jul 03, 2009 2:56 pm UTC

Transformers 2
Spoiler:
Railguns not firing projectiles. Tanks coming off hovercraft in the sea and somehow reaching the Giza pyramids instantly.


Star Trek Movie
Spoiler:
Supernova that threatens the entire galaxy.
The entire scene with "escaping" the black hole.
Spacecraft reaching each other the same way up.
Sound in space.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby lulzfish » Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:02 pm UTC

Transformers 2
Spoiler:
The really strange part is that he said railguns were classified. They can't be that classified if there are YouTube videos and Popular Science articles about them >_>

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby mdyrud » Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:07 pm UTC

The new Star Trek wasn't all bad though. I remember in the first battle when a hole is blown in a ship, a girl is sucked out of the ship screaming, but as soon as she leaves it becomes completely silent.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:14 pm UTC

The new Star Trek's flaws are mostly in places where Future Science is meant to be in play--black holes, space mining, etc.

Spoiler:
And personally I never interpreted "threaten the galaxy" to mean literally "destroy the galaxy" as much as "it's going to kill Romulus, and that's just going to screw everything up" or "we had a supernova, now Nero is here, and the galaxy [ie, the Federation] is threatened". A bit of hyperbole or metaphor from Spock. I realize it sounds like a diehard fan trying to make it all fit, and it is sort of. But that's really what I first assumed.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby BlackSails » Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:35 pm UTC

My biggest question for star trek is why they dont just use the warp cores as weapons. They are more powerful than even the future romulan weapons.

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Interactive Civilian » Sat Jul 04, 2009 3:28 am UTC

mdyrud wrote:The new Star Trek wasn't all bad though. I remember in the first battle when a hole is blown in a ship, a girl is sucked out of the ship screaming, but as soon as she leaves it becomes completely silent.

That was creepy awesome. Extremely well-executed scene. :D I'm glad they got over the obsession for sound in space for that one, and thought that it actually gave that battle a more intense feeling.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby SummerGlauFan » Sat Jul 04, 2009 4:20 am UTC

BlackSails wrote:My biggest question for star trek is why they dont just use the warp cores as weapons. They are more powerful than even the future romulan weapons.


On a related note, warp cores supposedly get their explosive power from all the antimatter they have. However, I read somewhere that a photon torpedo is supposed to have about a pound/pound and a half of antimatter, and yet their explosive power is pitifully small. Often, they hit an unshielded ship, and maybe blow a hole slightly bigger than the torpedo itself. Heck, they should be vaporizing the target ship!
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Mother Superior » Sat Jul 04, 2009 8:43 am UTC

SummerGlauFan wrote:
BlackSails wrote:My biggest question for star trek is why they dont just use the warp cores as weapons. They are more powerful than even the future romulan weapons.


On a related note, warp cores supposedly get their explosive power from all the antimatter they have. However, I read somewhere that a photon torpedo is supposed to have about a pound/pound and a half of antimatter, and yet their explosive power is pitifully small. Often, they hit an unshielded ship, and maybe blow a hole slightly bigger than the torpedo itself. Heck, they should be vaporizing the target ship!

I'm pretty sure photon torpedoes have been retconned and re-retconned quite a few times now. Originally they weren't supposed to be solid, just another energy weapon.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Technical Ben » Sat Jul 04, 2009 2:11 pm UTC

They just suggested installing a server farm in space on the local TV [edit] Read National News[/edit]. Why? Because it would be kept "cool".
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Roĝer » Sat Jul 04, 2009 10:36 pm UTC

I foresee some bandwidth problems there.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Charlie! » Sun Jul 05, 2009 1:04 am UTC

And also some heat management problems.
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby BlackSails » Sun Jul 05, 2009 5:12 am UTC

And debris impact problems

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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby EricH » Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:14 am UTC

Don't forget hard radiation problems. Any computer you want to run in space needs a chip redesign, which means the best rad hard processors available are five or six years behind the times. Moore's Law, anyone?
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby GuitarFreak » Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:42 pm UTC

Sorry for the bump, but this mad me facepalm so hard when I saw it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygB0ZviqXac
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Re: Facepalm TV

Postby Talith » Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:51 pm UTC

GuitarFreak wrote:Sorry for the bump, but this mad me facepalm so hard when I saw it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygB0ZviqXac

Oh god I cringed.


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