A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

For the discussion of the sciences. Physics problems, chemistry equations, biology weirdness, it all goes here.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

Is this an intriguing idea?

Yes
97
90%
No
11
10%
 
Total votes: 108

User avatar
Solt
Posts: 1912
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:08 am UTC
Location: California

Re: A real water world….

Postby Solt » Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:17 pm UTC

On the surface, you'd need varying features to see anything interesting I think (aside from an atmosphere). A night and day, at the very least. Perfect uniformity of external influences implies equilibrium, which means boring.

Uneven heating of the water world, either through night/day or through surface features (an observation zepplin?) would result in currents. Not sure how that would develop, might be cool.

Also, there would obviously be a critical mass beyond which the world would develop a high pressure ice core. It would be interesting to see just how dense you could get the ice to be.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,
produced a more reliable product. But sailors do
not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a
most annoying habit of splitting in two."
-J.W. Morris

User avatar
minkymomo
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:09 pm UTC

Re: A real water world….

Postby minkymomo » Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:53 pm UTC

No night and day as uniform heating from the multiple suns. How might the core loose heat so it would get an ice core? Just how the water would react to the very high pressure is one of the things I was wondering about. I did try and state the situation such so the water would neither boil nor freeze. I guess that there would be currents as there would be uneven heating within the planet but those currents might just distribute the heat evenly. One might think that at the core it would get warmer as pressure grew, such as when a sun ignites the fusion cores, but that would be a really big water world!

Billa

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world….

Postby gmalivuk » Mon Dec 03, 2007 1:11 am UTC

The ice core would result not from low temperature but from very, very high pressure. Check out the rest of the thread I'm merging this with. (There's a link in the original post to the complete phase diagram of water, including the forms of ice it makes at very high pressures, like what you'd find at the center of a world-sized ball of it.)
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

scalziand
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 3:02 pm UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby scalziand » Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:06 am UTC

Would the high-pressure ice core, if it formed, be dense enough so that it wouldn't try to float?

In other words, wouldn't the ice core try to float?

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:12 am UTC

scalziand wrote:Would the high-pressure ice core, if it formed, be dense enough so that it wouldn't try to float?

In other words, wouldn't the ice core try to float?

It's not normal ice. Because it forms under high pressure instead of low temperature, the crystal structure is different, and so it's something like 1.5 times the density of liquid water.

http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/water/phase.html
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

scalziand
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 3:02 pm UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby scalziand » Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:20 am UTC

Wow. thanks for the link.

Yet another reason why water is such an odd compound.

User avatar
BoomFrog
Posts: 1070
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 5:59 am UTC
Location: Seattle

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby BoomFrog » Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:24 am UTC

On the origonal topic:

Natives on this world would have as many words for currents as the Inuits have for snow. Surface cities would float along the known safe currents, but other areas would be uninhabitable because they regularly suffered from hurricanes or whatever. As civilization advanced the cities would grow larger then the "naturally safe" sizes and the fringes and "slums" of the cities would be in danger of getting ripped apart annually.
"Everything I need to know about parenting I learned from cooking. Don't be afraid to experiment, and eat your mistakes." - Cronos

User avatar
e946
Posts: 621
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2007 6:32 am UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby e946 » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:00 am UTC

I find what would happen if this waterball collided with an actual planet to be more intriguing than the waterball itself.

User avatar
Indon
Posts: 4433
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:21 pm UTC
Location: Alabama :(
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Indon » Tue Dec 04, 2007 3:11 pm UTC

I imagine I would be sucked into a gigantic whirlpool of doom.

But seriously, can you imagine the ridiculous convection currents for that planet? There would be constant flow between the warmer outer core (where the pressure isn't sufficiently high to produce ice) and the cooler near-surface (where the sunlight doesn't penetrate). It'd make earth weather look like, I dunno, the weather of a planet that has very little weather.

I'm not even sure what kind of temperature the core could sustain with that convection, and that's assuming it formed hot, as opposed to being formed cold.

Man, this is a fascinating scenario.
So, I like talking. So if you want to talk about something with me, feel free to send me a PM.

My blog, now rarely updated.

Image

User avatar
Swivelguy
Posts: 469
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:11 pm UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Swivelguy » Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:18 pm UTC

If the water planet was going around a sun, I'll bet it could develop polar ice caps. This makes me wonder what the phase composition would look like as you traveled from a pole to the center. The polar ice would obviously be the kitchen variety while the core ice would be high-density ice, but would they be connected by a continuous solid rod, or would the polar ice caps be freely floating?

Also, I'll bet hurricanes would absolutely rule the planet.
EVE Online: Daesis Wrack
Starcraft 2 (US): CosmicOsmo #465
Anarchy Online (RK2): Azzamis

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:16 pm UTC

Swivelguy wrote:The polar ice would obviously be the kitchen variety while the core ice would be high-density ice, but would they be connected by a continuous solid rod, or would the polar ice caps be freely floating?

Probably they would be freely floating, because the ice on top insulates the water underneath, so it wouldn't freeze very far down.

However, I don't know that it would have ice caps that were at all permanent. The currents going every which way seem like they would prevent large ice caps from forming.

Also, because of the ease of convection throughout the entire planet (apart from the ice core), I imagine it would cool down rather quickly, being left eventually with little or no "geo"thermal energy and being heated primarily by the star(s) in its vicinity. Also, there wouldn't be any radioactive isotopes the breakdown of which would continue supplying it with heat like what happens here on Earth.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

User avatar
Indon
Posts: 4433
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:21 pm UTC
Location: Alabama :(
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Indon » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:48 pm UTC

I dunno about currents going 'every which way'. I'm envisioning a 'weather' system dominated by a handful of massive currents.

Our major sources of current are convection, which would seem to produce mostly major currents with its' relatively simple heat model, and tidal forces, which without actual land to break waves, don't seem like they'd produce much current... though... I wonder how big the tidal swell would get?
So, I like talking. So if you want to talk about something with me, feel free to send me a PM.

My blog, now rarely updated.

Image

User avatar
arkady
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 4:39 pm UTC
Location: Sheffield, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby arkady » Wed Dec 05, 2007 1:13 am UTC

Next week I start lab sessions where I make a computer model of a star.

Once I've done that, I'm going to twerk the model to work out how much water you'd need, what the size would be, etc...

I have the feeling a meteorite impact would be a rather catastrophic event, though.
I spent most of my money on fast cars, expensive guitars and women. The rest I just squandered.

e+1 = 0

*DISASTER AREA* Universe Tour. [Backstage pass]

User avatar
Zohar
COMMANDER PORN
Posts: 8565
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:45 pm UTC
Location: Denver

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Zohar » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:19 am UTC

arkady wrote:I have the feeling a meteorite impact would be a rather awesome event, though.


Fix'd.
Mighty Jalapeno: "See, Zohar agrees, and he's nice to people."
SecondTalon: "Still better looking than Jesus."

Not how I say my name

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re:

Postby Robin S » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:27 am UTC

mehmattski wrote:Realistically, though, what would a rotating mostly liquid planet even look like?
There could be some interesting variations in rotation-induced currents with latitude (as with the gas giants).
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

User avatar
Prole
Posts: 245
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 2:14 pm UTC
Location: In your *noun* *verb*ing your *related noun*

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Prole » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:33 am UTC

This effectively would be the same as gas giant, right?

Only difference being size and the fact that its made from just water.

A molecular gas giant if you will.
Image

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Robin S » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:35 am UTC

Well, its solid core might be significantly larger. I don't know enough about the physics of water, and haven't got the time right now to look into it.
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:06 pm UTC

Robin S wrote:Well, its solid core might be significantly larger. I don't know enough about the physics of water, and haven't got the time right now to look into it.

The largest sphere of water you could have remain liquid all the way through (at room temperature) would have a radius of about 2500km. Surface gravity in this case is only about 7% that of Earth. If you wanted one Earth gravity at the surface, the solid core would start quite a bit shallower than 2500km, because the water above it would be heavier, and thus the pressure would be higher. (Ice VI starts at about 9000 atmospheres, which would happen at a depth of about 90km depth on Earth.)

So, I guess we'd either have to compromise on it being a giant-ish planet, or on its being mostly liquid all the way through.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

zenten
Posts: 3799
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:42 am UTC
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby zenten » Thu Dec 06, 2007 6:16 pm UTC

What happens if it has a moon?

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Robin S » Thu Dec 06, 2007 6:19 pm UTC

Megatides?
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Robin S » Thu Dec 06, 2007 10:44 pm UTC

Of course, the meteor travelling all the way through (for fluid) is only really applicable if the planet itself is small enough that its solid core is more or less negligible. Considering that a planet this size would be on a comparable scale to the meteor itself, have you considered the possibility that under such an impact, some of the water might actually break away from the planet's gravitational pull?
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

User avatar
wst
Posts: 2613
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 10:06 am UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby wst » Thu Dec 06, 2007 11:02 pm UTC

It might break away if the meteor hit the water at a shallow angle...

Or the meteor might skip away...

Or the meteor might not be able to escape the gravity properly and be drawn into a very big, very scary, skipping stone. That sort of orbits, but skips off the surface... and the ripples would travel around the planet and maybe coincide with impacts, saving some of the meteorites energy. Result? A serious moon problem, worse than your typical werewolf infestation. You'd dread full moon, because it would be right on top of you...

Would it knock the planet totally off balance and make it into a sort of eccentric cam? Things would be lighter on one side of the planet than the other, from the inertia.

But the meteorite would be there, so playing low-gravity games would be a no-no.
Anything I said pre-2014 that you want to quote me on, just run it past me to check I still agree with myself.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Dec 07, 2007 1:46 am UTC

Robin S wrote:Of course, the meteor travelling all the way through (for fluid) is only really applicable if the planet itself is small enough that its solid core is more or less negligible. Considering that a planet this size would be on a comparable scale to the meteor itself, have you considered the possibility that under such an impact, some of the water might actually break away from the planet's gravitational pull?

Actually, no. A ball of water at 20 Celsius could be quite a bit bigger than the Moon and still remain liquid all the way through. Granted, its surface gravity would only be about 0.7 m/s2, so lots of water probably would escape after a sufficiently strong collision. But it's still going to be a rather big ball of water.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Robin S » Fri Dec 07, 2007 12:30 pm UTC

When I said "a comparable scale", I meant "within an order of magnitude or so", i.e. close enough that significant bits of it could be flung into space by the impact.
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

zenten
Posts: 3799
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:42 am UTC
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby zenten » Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:45 pm UTC

Robin S wrote:When I said "a comparable scale", I meant "within an order of magnitude or so", i.e. close enough that significant bits of it could be flung into space by the impact.


That's going to be a fairly big asteroid. I'm not convinced that the mass required would be much different than doing the same thing to the Earth.

User avatar
hipp5
Posts: 321
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 4:05 am UTC
Location: Kingston, ON

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby hipp5 » Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:53 pm UTC

Have you guys played Mario Galaxy yet? There's some water worlds in that. They're probably the least fun part of the game though.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:18 pm UTC

zenten wrote:
Robin S wrote:When I said "a comparable scale", I meant "within an order of magnitude or so", i.e. close enough that significant bits of it could be flung into space by the impact.


That's going to be a fairly big asteroid. I'm not convinced that the mass required would be much different than doing the same thing to the Earth.

Nah, considering that the largest fully-liquid ball we could have (assuming room temperature all the way through; it could be bigger if the center is warmer) only has 0.7m/s2 of gravity on the surface, and a sharper gravitational force fall-off than Earth (because it's going to be about 40% of Earth's radius), less energy would be required to lift some of the surface water to escape (or at least orbital) velocity. (Escape velocity at the surface of this ball of water is only about 1.9 km/s, compared to 11.18 km/s for Earth. Orbital velocity is this divided by sqrt(2).)
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

zenten
Posts: 3799
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:42 am UTC
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby zenten » Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:24 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
zenten wrote:
Robin S wrote:When I said "a comparable scale", I meant "within an order of magnitude or so", i.e. close enough that significant bits of it could be flung into space by the impact.


That's going to be a fairly big asteroid. I'm not convinced that the mass required would be much different than doing the same thing to the Earth.

Nah, considering that the largest fully-liquid ball we could have (assuming room temperature all the way through; it could be bigger if the center is warmer) only has 0.7m/s2 of gravity on the surface, and a sharper gravitational force fall-off than Earth (because it's going to be about 40% of Earth's radius), less energy would be required to lift some of the surface water to escape (or at least orbital) velocity. (Escape velocity at the surface of this ball of water is only about 1.9 km/s, compared to 11.18 km/s for Earth. Orbital velocity is this divided by sqrt(2).)


Right, sorry. I was thinking "same mass as Earth" for some reason. And yes, I know that means solid water.

Does the solid water just change back into liquid at room temperature if the pressure is lowered, or will it maintain it's state somehow?

Also, how warm does a water planet with Earth like gravity at the surface have to be to remain liquid throughout?

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:32 pm UTC

zenten wrote:Does the solid water just change back into liquid at room temperature if the pressure is lowered, or will it maintain it's state somehow?

Also, how warm does a water planet with Earth like gravity at the surface have to be to remain liquid throughout?

Solid water (ice of any type, that is) would probably change back into liquid at room temperature and "normal" pressures. At least, as far as I know. Though there are probably additional states corresponding to superheated or supercooled liquid water at (near) normal conditions.

Assuming liquid water all the way through (and thus a density close enough to 1000kg/m3 for that approximation to work), the pressure at the center would be 1.7x1011 Pa. According to the phase diagram here, that pressure still results in a form of ice up to at least 800K. The positive slope of the liquid/solid boundary suggests the possibility that, at much higher temperatures, water at that pressure need not be solid. However, the temperatures will be quite a bit above water's critical point at 647K, where a meaningful distinction between liquid and vapor phases ceases to exist.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

User avatar
i like pi
Posts: 310
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:50 pm UTC
Location: yer mom

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby i like pi » Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:34 pm UTC

this is quite the good idea.
Or something to that effect. Hell, I don't know.

Robin S
Posts: 3579
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Robin S » Fri Dec 07, 2007 10:45 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
zenten wrote:That's going to be a fairly big asteroid. I'm not convinced that the mass required would be much different than doing the same thing to the Earth.

Nah, considering that the largest fully-liquid ball we could have [...]
Also,
evilbeanfiend wrote:I'm wondering what sort of resistive force the planet would apply to a meteor ~100km wide.
It was meant to be a pretty big asteroid (100km is fairly large by asteroid standards).
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

GMontag
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2007 5:47 am UTC
Location: Bellingham, Washington

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby GMontag » Sat Dec 08, 2007 1:33 am UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Solid water (ice of any type, that is) would probably change back into liquid at room temperature and "normal" pressures.


Except for ice-nine of course, which catalyzes normal water into ice-nine.

Canter
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 2:17 am UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby Canter » Sat Dec 08, 2007 2:52 am UTC

What is the difference between difference between Ice1-Ice16? Is it just density of it all? And do all other Elements have a denser solid? Such as Fe12? Could be interesting. Anyway, I'm very curious.

--Patrick

User avatar
wst
Posts: 2613
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 10:06 am UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby wst » Sat Dec 08, 2007 12:48 pm UTC

Just a really crazy idea here, but hear me out...

If somehow the planet span fast enough, and was totally liquid, would it be possible for it to become toroid?

That'd be cool. You could look up at the sky (with a telescope) and see people on the other side of the world.

I'm going to go off and dream of a toroid planet, maybe make some sketches in my free time, etc. Make a little toroid planet alternate reality.

Edit: Fixed a bit of grammar.
Anything I said pre-2014 that you want to quote me on, just run it past me to check I still agree with myself.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26819
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Dec 08, 2007 6:00 pm UTC

wst wrote:Just a really crazy idea here, but hear me out...

If somehow the planet span fast enough, and was totally liquid, would it be possible for it to become toroid?

That'd be cool. You could look up at the sky (with a telescope) and see people on the other side of the world.

I'm going to go off and dream of a toroid planet, maybe make some sketches in my free time, etc. Make a little toroid planet alternate reality.

Edit: Fixed a bit of grammar.

Not unless you had some ring structure holding the torus together. Under normal conditions, spinning a planet fast enough will turn it into more and more of a disc, but if you punched out the middle (to make it torus-like), there would no longer be enough gravity to hold the rest of it together, most likely, and you'd end up, at best, with a sort of Kemplerer rosette of bodies orbiting their common barycenter.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

User avatar
arkady
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 4:39 pm UTC
Location: Sheffield, UK
Contact:

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby arkady » Tue Dec 11, 2007 12:57 am UTC

I'm fairly sure that you'd have to have some sort of atmosphere, since liquids can't exist in a vacuum - you either have an ice interface, or an atmosphere.

In this case I'll have a guess at a water vapour atmosphere.
I spent most of my money on fast cars, expensive guitars and women. The rest I just squandered.

e+1 = 0

*DISASTER AREA* Universe Tour. [Backstage pass]

User avatar
SpitValve
Not a mod.
Posts: 5130
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:51 am UTC
Location: Lower pork village

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby SpitValve » Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:35 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Not unless you had some ring structure holding the torus together. Under normal conditions, spinning a planet fast enough will turn it into more and more of a disc, but if you punched out the middle (to make it torus-like), there would no longer be enough gravity to hold the rest of it together, most likely, and you'd end up, at best, with a sort of Kemplerer rosette of bodies orbiting their common barycenter.


You can get contact binaries, which aren't dissimilar.

What is the gravity due to a ring/torus anyway?

User avatar
Me321
Posts: 164
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 4:03 am UTC

Re:

Postby Me321 » Mon Jul 30, 2012 6:55 pm UTC

Belial wrote:You'd have to play by GPS/Radar, because by the time you got within visual distance, you'd already be blowing past your opponent.

I think at lower speeds it would be fun, too, though. A sport where there are chases that last *weeks* to intercept the guy with the "ball" would be kindof ridiculous, in the fun way.

Maybe the ball could be some kind of buoy that one boat tows behind it, and the goal is to bring your fleet to bear and take it by force (Using approved, nonlethal weapons, of course.), and tow in the opposite direction?

And maybe you could program the buoy to propel itself to other members of your team in an automated fashion, at slightly faster than the top speed of the boats, to replicate "passing the ball"? And have a time-delay on information about where the ball is, so that the strategy becomes more complicated than just "everyone converge on the guy with the ball" and it's not just two fleets kicking the tar out of each other perpetually.

The more I describe this, the more it sounds like fun. I could play this for years.

But then, I really like the ocean.

Edit: Wait....shit....we *have* oceans on this planet. Anyone want to get some boats and play a game? I think the trickiest part will be building the "ball".



Turn this into a computer game... ill play it

User avatar
WarDaft
Posts: 1583
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 3:16 pm UTC

Re: A real water world (merged with "a big ball of water")

Postby WarDaft » Tue Jul 31, 2012 3:55 am UTC

You can't possibly throw something fast enough to get through a water world 'fast' enough for it to get through. See, the higher velocity you are at, the fewer differences there are between hitting air and rock. There are actually high velocities that will cause a solid object to explode from friction in the interstellar medium, let alone water!
All Shadow priest spells that deal Fire damage now appear green.
Big freaky cereal boxes of death.

Aelfyre
Posts: 358
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 4:22 pm UTC
Location: 3 decades west of the teenage wasteland
Contact:

Re:

Postby Aelfyre » Tue Jul 31, 2012 4:53 am UTC

hyperion wrote:Well now. In case you didn't already know, you'd need a fuckload of water.

m(Earth) = 5.9742*10^24 kg
.'. m(water for 1g)= m(Earth) = 5.9742*10^24 kg
p(water) = 1000 kgm^-3
.'. V = m/p = 5.9742*10^24 kg / 1000 = 5.9742*10^21 L
V = (4/3)(pi)(r)^3
.'. r = (V/((4/3)(pi)))^(1/3)
r = 11 256 336 m = 11 256.336 km
r(Earth) = 6 378.1 km

I am aware that it wouldn't have a uniform density, but that's as good as I can get.
And, knowing myself, I probably got it massively wrong.


ok so that's a metric rather than imperial fuckload.. got it.

Didn't I read a story about scientist finding 1.21 gigafuckloads of spacewater? some kind of cloud with trillions of earths worth of water in the vicinity or being spewed from the jets of a black hole?

Not completely inconceivable that a sufficient quantity collapsed on some sort of "seed" small iron core or something and creted said water world and then drifted into a star system where the sun could keep most of it liquid.
Xanthir wrote:To be fair, even perfectly friendly antimatter wildebeests are pretty deadly.


Return to “Science”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests