Fomrula for compression of water

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Quizatzhaderac
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Fomrula for compression of water

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Sat Oct 30, 2010 3:04 pm UTC

My Google fu has failed me. The only answer I've found is that water (and all liquids) compress, but with absolutely no description of how beyond "it;s difficult".

I know (ideal) gasses compress under the formula V = k/P. I know that's obviously not true for liquids. So what is the formula? Or if the formula is too complex to list here, what's the scalability? Does water behave significantly different than other fluids in this respect?
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jmorgan3
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Re: Fomrula for compression of water

Postby jmorgan3 » Sat Oct 30, 2010 7:58 pm UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:My Google fu has failed me. The only answer I've found is that water (and all liquids) compress, but with absolutely no description of how beyond "it's difficult".

I know (ideal) gasses compress under the formula V = k/P. I know that's obviously not true for liquids. So what is the formula? Or if the formula is too complex to list here, what's the scalability? Does water behave significantly different than other fluids in this respect?

Wikipedia gives a good characterization of water's compressibility. The bulk modulus it gives, 2.2GPa, is the ratio of pressure to volume change. So, for example, water at 22MPa of pressure will have a volume (22MPa/2.2GPa)=1% smaller than at zero pressure. The compressibility numbers it gives are (1/Bulk Modulus). So the formula you are looking for is V = V0(1-(P/Bulk Modulus)) or V = V0(1-(P*Compressibility)) where V0 is the volume at zero pressure.

Note that bulk modulus/compressibility are only constant for small volume changes.
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Quizatzhaderac
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Re: Fomrula for compression of water

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Sat Oct 30, 2010 9:07 pm UTC

thank you
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