Mechatronics vs Nanotech

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Rafler
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Mechatronics vs Nanotech

Postby Rafler » Sat Jun 16, 2012 9:19 pm UTC

I just finished high school and got selected into a college for a B.tech course . So now I have to chose the course which i have to study and my options are Mechatronics and Nanotechnology .
I am comfortable with both fields as i have done experiments in both .

Any opinions ?

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Charlie!
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Re: Mechatronics vs Nanotech

Postby Charlie! » Sat Jun 23, 2012 10:25 am UTC

Mechatronics clearly has the cooler name.
Some people tell me I laugh too much. To them I say, "ha ha ha!"

qetzal
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Re: Mechatronics vs Nanotech

Postby qetzal » Sat Jun 23, 2012 2:39 pm UTC

Well I'll admit I'd never heard the term mechatronics before, but from this description, I'd say this. Mechatronics sounds like a discipline that's much more relevant to practical, real-world applications. It appears to involve disciplines that are already fairly mature.

In contrast, nanotech is much less mature. (At least, the parts I know are quite immature - nanotech in chemistry, biology, & medicine. Maybe nanotech for materials science is more mature?)

So one suggestion is this. If you're interested in being able to do useful, practical things, I'd guess mechatronics may be better. If you're interested in more blue-sky researchy things, maybe nanotech would be better.

HTH

soggybomb
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Re: Mechatronics vs Nanotech

Postby soggybomb » Sun Jun 24, 2012 3:50 am UTC

I suppose I work in nanotechnology, seeing as my research focus is carbon nanotubes. It is a thriving field with a lot of interesting physics. I haven't heard of mechatronics before, but from looking at wikipedia, it looks like a strictly sort of engineering thing. You may encounter some new problems, but the problems are problems of engineering; you won't be doing much that is new. Nanoscience is still very much a research-based endeavor, but the science is all immediately applicable to an engineering application.

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KestrelLowing
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Re: Mechatronics vs Nanotech

Postby KestrelLowing » Thu Jun 28, 2012 2:16 pm UTC

soggybomb wrote:I suppose I work in nanotechnology, seeing as my research focus is carbon nanotubes. It is a thriving field with a lot of interesting physics. I haven't heard of mechatronics before, but from looking at wikipedia, it looks like a strictly sort of engineering thing. You may encounter some new problems, but the problems are problems of engineering; you won't be doing much that is new. Nanoscience is still very much a research-based endeavor, but the science is all immediately applicable to an engineering application.


Ouch! You hit me right in the heart! :wink: Engineering is totally new sometimes!

I'm biased because I'm basically going into mechatronics (well, controls, but it's more or less the same, just with a less flashy name), but it is a really interesting field because it's so broad.

Basically, it requires that you have knowledge of mechanics, dynamics, electronics, and computer science. Most people tend to specialize in some area and just have a basic background in the others. I, for example, am best with dynamics and mechanics, am familiar with electronics (but they're mostly black boxes of magic for me), and am working on improving my CS and programming skills.

But I agree with the general sentiments - mechatronics can be used in the world right now and is more engineering problems than science problems (which doesn't mean they're easier, just different - it's up to you what problem you prefer solving). Nanotech is a bit more 'futuristic' and will likely have somewhat less direct application and has more science type than engineering problems.


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