first radiation constant as 3/8th?

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steve waterman
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first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby steve waterman » Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:52 pm UTC

What if ? the electric constant = 8.85418782 × 10-12 m-3 kg^-1 s^4 A^2
was actually derived from the isoperimetric quotient of a sphere* = V^2 / S^3 = 1 / ( 36 pi ) = 8.8419412 x 10^n

This in turn, would derive the the speed of light at exactly 3, versus 2.99792458 exactly. where c = 1 / ( electric constant x magnetic constant )

What if ? Planck's constant = 6.6260688 was 3/4 of this "isoperimetric" electric constant ? = 1 / ( 48 pi ) = 6.63145596216231

then, when we calculate the first radiation constant as 2 x pi x Planck x light squared = 3.741771068
we would get 3.75 x 10^n = 3/8 exactly. considering the nature of pi, Planck and squaring light, this is curious, as 3/8th would appear to mathematically relate better to a possible radiation value than the asserted/measurement related NIST decimal value. The decimal value is vague as this potential relationship, whereas 3/8th is frequently enough seen in math and physics equations.

*http://mathworld.wolfram.com/IsoperimetricQuotient.html
"While statistics and measurements can be misleading, mathematics itself, is not subjective."
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steve

gorcee
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Re: first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby gorcee » Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:00 pm UTC

What if cheese was actually waffles?

Radical_Initiator
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Re: first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby Radical_Initiator » Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:05 pm UTC

What if Steve was phone?
I looked out across the river today …

Birk
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Re: first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:15 pm UTC

What if thread was lock?

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Re: first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby Radical_Initiator » Sat Jul 14, 2012 4:38 pm UTC

Ahem.

Birk wrote:What if thread was lock?
I looked out across the river today …

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gmalivuk
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Re: first radiation constant as 3/8th?

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Jul 14, 2012 4:58 pm UTC

We can define units however we want, so Steve should feel more than welcome to use a Stevean meter, Stevean gram, Stevean second, and so on, in which those relationships all hold.

The rest of us will continue instead to use either the SI units the rest of the world uses, or when we want mathematical convenience in our physics equations, we'll use Planck units where most of the physical constants work out to 1.
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