Leaving home for Uni?

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Pebbles
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Leaving home for Uni?

Postby Pebbles » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:29 am UTC

Basically... Should I leave home to attend uni in another state? This would involve living on campus and being three states away from my family.

Im doing uni by distance education at the moment and I hate it. Really, hate. I feel very isolated and bored. And I know I would enjoy it more if I had people doing the same kinda thing around me.

I just want to know from the fora's collected wealth of experience.. how does this work? About how much am I looking at money wise per week? Will I really enjoy it as much as I think? What are the pros and cons of this arrangment?

The very idea of this is abit scary for me, it will be pushing me outside my comfort zone.. Iv never even been to Perth before! It looks beautiful though. I will be moving to a new state, where I dont know anyone, living with strangers and attempting to complete a university degree. I must admit it also sounds fun.

This is only ideas at the moment. I may have left it too late for it to be possible next year, maybe the year after.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.
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Postby evilbeanfiend » Mon Sep 03, 2007 10:14 am UTC

i'd go with yes. you will probably enjoy it much more, you will probably become more independent, you will probably try a lot more new things, you will probably enjoy visiting your family again more.

cost? someone in uni in oz had better answer that but bear in mind it depends how frugal a person you are, i'm quite good a tightening the purse strings so never needed any loans or overdraft. at uni some of my friends however ran up huge debts and large overdrafts despite receiving over double the money i had in grant and money from parents.
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Postby damienthebloody » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:12 am UTC

Short version: Do it.

Long version:
Curtin or UWA? Either way, go. You will meet people, do new things, live independently, and broaden your mind. It is ABSOLUTELY worth doing if you can.

In terms of money, it really depends on various things. If you were to come to Sydney, say, you'd need at least $200 a week to survive. But rent in perth is much cheaper, i believe. One of my closest friends is out there, and she loves it.

Pros:
Independence
New experience
New people
Meeting like minded people
Opportunities to broaden your cultural experience
Much better environment for your education than distance ed

Cons:
Money
Missing family
Scary (at first)

...in other words, just do it :D

In terms of timing, it's probably not too late to apply for march admission, and, failing that, you should be able to enter halfway through the year (although this is based entirely on my experience in NSW - I'm not sure what they do in WA).

Seriously: go for it!
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Postby TheKhakinator » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:14 am UTC

I have no idea about anything but it sounds like it's worth doing.

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Postby Pebbles » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:40 am UTC

Im with Curtin.
Ive been looking and the rent for on campus rooms and it ranges between about 100$ and 130$
So that seems cool.
Im gonna check out if there are any government benefits I can get. Free money is always a positive. Otherwise Ill have to get a job out there.
Its just sounding more and more like a good idea...
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

-Neil Gaiman

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Postby Hawknc » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:42 am UTC

That's not bad for on-campus accommodation. Does that include meals as well, or do you have to make your own?

(Oh, and I agree with everyone else that you should totally do it. You will have a crazy fun time, even if there isn't the hugest amount to do in Perth.)

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Postby fragsta » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:47 am UTC

No question about it, move away. You'll really grow as a person and become independent, meet loads of interesting people, and it'll make seeing family more enjoyable. Or at least for me it did.

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Postby Pebbles » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:57 am UTC

Its without meals, which I dont mind. I can cook.. vaguely.
I should also mention Im yet to talk to my parents about this.. although they know how much I hate doing distance ed.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

-Neil Gaiman

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Postby Hawknc » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:59 am UTC

Ultimately you're an adult and your parents can't force you to do anything, but I will admit that having their support does make things a lot easier.

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Postby Pebbles » Mon Sep 03, 2007 12:24 pm UTC

Im most likely going to need some financial assistance from them. At least if I cant get any government assistance. Im gonna check that out now.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

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Postby ZeroSum » Mon Sep 03, 2007 12:32 pm UTC

Do it. It'll be a fun adventure. /thread.

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Postby xyzzy » Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:09 pm UTC

Well, I'm intending to do Uni 8 time zones away, so I'd say go for it.
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Postby Toeofdoom » Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:51 pm UTC

I'd say go man, way better that way. Although I'm wondering why you arent just studying at a uni nearer to home...

me and a few friends are planning to see if we can rent a 3 bedroom place together, but we were looking at 200-250 a week for all 4 of us... although only 2 of us have steady income at the moment (one of which is me...)

If you're wondering why its 4 people in 3 bedrooms, well, theres my friend and his girlfriend and her current home sucks apparently. anyways.... we're basically waiting for it to become slightly more viable. then theres the fact that right now, the average age of these 4 people is 17.

oh, and tell me what you find out about government assistance because I'm slightly too lazy to look it up myself right now
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damienthebloody
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Postby damienthebloody » Mon Sep 03, 2007 2:16 pm UTC

yeah - just curious, but why Curtin? is there something specific there, or did you just figure that if you were going to go to uni, the other side of the country was the right way to go about it? :P
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Postby b.i.o » Mon Sep 03, 2007 2:21 pm UTC

I just got at college less than a week ago, and it's already the best experience of my life. Do it!

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Postby Rasputin » Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:09 pm UTC

Get the fuck out of your house, and go stay at a college/uni. Best friggen thing ever. I have no regrets doing it.
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Postby Jacque » Mon Sep 03, 2007 4:27 pm UTC

Move out. It's part of growing up and becoming an adult.

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Postby Solt » Mon Sep 03, 2007 6:56 pm UTC

Definitely worth it. Expand your horizons, gain some life experience!

And yes, it does make seeing family more enjoyable.
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Postby Khonsu » Mon Sep 03, 2007 7:02 pm UTC

Don't attend college in your hometown. Ever. I did and it pretty much fucked me up. I'm so glad to be away from my family and have the ability to be who I want and do what I want--there are basic life skills you NEED that you cannot learn at home. I am currently visiting my folks from my usual spot, and God, I am not happy. The complacency of this place? I realize it would have destroyed me as a person to just grow complacent here like everyone else. I never would be as close to my dreams as I am right now if I hadn't jumped in the deep-end and finally got the fuck away.

DO IT. Don't wait. Don't be afraid. Don't doubt yourself (though it is perfectly okay and normal). Don't do what I did--don't let what you know keep you ignorant. Go. Be yourself.

Also, never ever ever get a credit card. EVER. It's just way too easy to fuck up.

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Postby marshlight » Mon Sep 03, 2007 8:26 pm UTC

On the flip side to Khonsu's argument, if you are really close with your family, attending college in your hometown may be a good idea. I love being able to go home for Sunday meals and free laundry and chats with my mom. It helps that I'm also on campus and away from them for much of the time - that said, stay as near to campus as you can, it rocks! - and the university is pretty prestigious in terms of my major. The key thing is being on your own for the majority of the experience, though. Going away is fun!
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Postby Khonsu » Mon Sep 03, 2007 8:38 pm UTC

Well yes, if you're more of a family person than worried about autonomy, moving doesn't have to be an option, but most people I know are better off because they were forced to grow up upon moving out.

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Postby PictureSarah » Mon Sep 03, 2007 8:49 pm UTC

I can address both sides of that argument. I am EXTREMELY close to my family, my parents are my best friends...and I went to school a few days before turning 18, 3000 miles away on the other side of the country. Even though I talked to my family every day via phone and instant messenger, it was absolutely heartwrenching. I don't think I've ever been as miserable as I was the first 6 months or so...some weeks I could barely make myself get out of bed and would miss all my classes.
BUT
I can now handle getting an apartment, paying rent, paying utility bills, getting around the city, making my own travel arrangements, and talking to just about anyone on my own, where before I couldn't. If my parents had been there to take care of everything for me and hold my hand through it all, I don't think I would be self-sufficient today.

Do it I say. A nice compromise, had it been possible, would be to have gone to a school that was several hours drive away, so that I would have been forced to take care of myself but could have gone home on the odd weekend when things were just too much to bear. If there's a school that's a good distance from your family, but not too far, that would be a good option for you.
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Postby ks_physicist » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:26 pm UTC

I turned down opportunities to go to, among other places, Duke and MIT, because I didn't want to be too far from my family to visit often. I took advice that "it doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do with it."

Well, it turns out they both matter.

In many ways I regret that decision tremendously, mainly because I now realize just how much I gave up. I would not make the same decision again.

Go.

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Postby Pebbles » Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:35 am UTC

damienthebloody wrote:yeah - just curious, but why Curtin? is there something specific there, or did you just figure that if you were going to go to uni, the other side of the country was the right way to go about it? :P

Haha yeah, theres nothing special about Curtin as far as I know... It was a really last minute decision to do a Librarianship degree. They were the only uni who had a place for me. Well, it was either there or Charles Sturt in Wagga. But the Charles Sturt course is spread over 6 years. I did not want to be studying 6yrs for a course that takes 3.

Librarianship degrees are suprisingly not overly common. Theres only two ALIA recognised courses in NSW.

Im not overly close with my family... but I dont know how my mums gonna like it. Im the baby of the family, and my older sister is moving to Europe in a few weeks. One of my elder brothers is also in Europe and the other one lives on the Central Coast. If I leave.. thats kinda it for the mothering thing for her I guess.

Toeofdoom wrote:oh, and tell me what you find out about government assistance because I'm slightly too lazy to look it up myself right now


Yeah I looked.. the Centrelink website is really... not good. I think Im gonna have to waste a day in line down there to find any proper information about me specifically. But the link for study allowance and such is http://myaccount.centrelink.gov.au/wps/ ... itURL=true

Thanks for the advice guys, this is sounding like a resounding YES!
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

-Neil Gaiman

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Postby Hawknc » Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:45 am UTC

For the USians giving advice: I know most of you guys travel somewhere else for your degrees, but that's really not common in Australia, especially if you live in a town which has a university. Most of us stay in our hometowns, many of us even stay at home for the first few years. To do otherwise is simply too expensive for many people, as there are no government loans for supplementary costs such as accommodation, food, textbooks etc, only tuition.

About Centrelink: they suck and you will hate dealing with them, but they're your best chance to get enough cash to do it without working full-time. If you're independent and living out of home, you can expect something like $350 per fortnight, plus potentially a little bit of rent assistance and fare assistance for travel. I'd strongly suggest getting a part-time job as well, since you can earn up to a certain amount (something like a 150 per week, from memory, I could be way off) without it affecting your payment. Above that you'll lose about 50c of your payment for each dollar over the threshold you earn. They will screw things up and get your payments wrong and ask you many intrusive questions, but it's a necessary evil.

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Postby Birdman » Thu Sep 06, 2007 5:56 am UTC

Pebbles:

Ex Perth-wegian here. Also, I have a brother at Curtin Uni doing B Eng (mech) who lives on campus.

Go for it. Perth is big, hot, flat, sandy, windy, pretty, and great. Curtin seems fine. I couldn't say anything either for or against the Librarianship course though.

Living on campus has its good and bad points. That's part of the joy of it. The standard varies (my brother's in - he says - the lowest quality accomodation) but is all right for student housing. I like the fact that there are shared kitchens. In my on-campus living I had food included which was rarely identifiable and never edible. The experience is almost as valuable as the degree. Living away from home can be difficult but does wonders for your self-reliance.

Centrelink can be a chore. I still cherish the letter they sent me which demanded I return all the money they'd given me over the previous two years. That was a fun telephone conversation. Don't just rely on them telling you what you're entitled to: get the information packs and check for yourself. In my experience, the Centrelink people who deal with (only) students (typically in the call centres, counter-staff get everybody) are more relaxed and pleasant than those dealing with the unemployed.

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Postby damienthebloody » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:26 am UTC

Pebbles wrote:Librarianship degrees are suprisingly not overly common. Theres only two ALIA recognised courses in NSW.

Totally random - i know all this. one of my best friends is in fact doing that course at curtin right now.
Anyway, go!

(just in case you needed more encouragement). :D
German Sausage wrote:Is that an EMP in your pants, or are you just outraged by my sexist behaviour?
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Pebbles
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Postby Pebbles » Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:33 am UTC

damienthebloody wrote:
Pebbles wrote:Librarianship degrees are suprisingly not overly common. Theres only two ALIA recognised courses in NSW.

Totally random - i know all this. one of my best friends is in fact doing that course at curtin right now.
Anyway, go!

(just in case you needed more encouragement). :D


oh serious? Whats her name? Is she in her first year? I may already have some classes with her! Yay ready made friends!

Birdman wrote: Centrelink can be a chore. I still cherish the letter they sent me which demanded I return all the money they'd given me over the previous two years. That was a fun telephone conversation. Don't just rely on them telling you what you're entitled to: get the information packs and check for yourself. In my experience, the Centrelink people who deal with (only) students (typically in the call centres, counter-staff get everybody) are more relaxed and pleasant than those dealing with the unemployed.


Yeah I am dreading going in for a chat, but I know it will be worth it if I can get some money out of them.

I brought this up with my parents the other day... the reaction was not good. My dad laughed at me... im not really sure what that means. But I will be working on them in the coming months. Im sure they will see the sense in this.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

-Neil Gaiman

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damienthebloody
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Postby damienthebloody » Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:17 am UTC

yeah, she's in first year, although she's skipping some of it because she already has a diploma, so i'm not sure where exactly that puts her. But if you end up going over, i'll make sure to put you in touch with her.
German Sausage wrote:Is that an EMP in your pants, or are you just outraged by my sexist behaviour?
liza wrote:When life gives you a wife made of salt, make margaritas?
Dance like you're stamping on a human face forever.


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