Questions For The World

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
Carlington
Posts: 1588
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:46 am UTC
Location: Sydney, Australia.

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Carlington » Thu Mar 29, 2012 9:38 am UTC

Hrmmm. Michigan, I think of beer, Presbyterians, Machine shops and car factories, and Detroit is it's own sub-category. Detroit calls to mind lots of gun violence, don't know about gangs, though. Not necessarily projects, but I guess slums? Parts of the urban area with lots of working-class families that aren't too "well-off". I never really thought of Detroit as having suburbs, which is odd on reflection. As for Pennsylvania, I think lots of woodland/forests, lots of suburban housing, the sort in rows of houses with white picket fences ("Little boxes, on the hillside...") and not a lot else. Is the Pentagon actually in Pennsylvania, or did the plane ditch out a long way from it's intended target?
Kewangji: Posdy zwei tosdy osdy oady. Bork bork bork, hoppity syphilis bork.

Eebster the Great: What specifically is moving faster than light in these examples?
doogly: Hands waving furiously.

Please use he/him/his pronouns when referring to me.

User avatar
e^iπ+1=0
Much, much better than Gooder
Posts: 2065
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:41 am UTC
Location: Lancaster

Re: Questions For The World

Postby e^iπ+1=0 » Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:06 am UTC

Nope, it's in Virginia.
poxic wrote:You, sir, have heroic hair.
poxic wrote:I note that the hair is not slowing down. It appears to have progressed from heroic to rocking.

(Avatar by Sungura)

User avatar
TimelordSimone
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:05 pm UTC
Location: Cambridge ish

Re: Questions For The World

Postby TimelordSimone » Thu Mar 29, 2012 1:10 pm UTC

On Pennsylvania: I know where it is (just south of New York?), and that it's named after some Welsh guy (Somebody Penn, I forget) and Philadelphia is there, right? So marginally more than Michigan I guess.
I mostly lurk. Hello.

User avatar
fizzgig
Posts: 218
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 10:35 am UTC
Location: Canberra, Australia

Re: Questions For The World

Postby fizzgig » Fri Mar 30, 2012 7:35 am UTC

Are there Amish people in Pennsylvania? Maybe?

User avatar
bentheimmigrant
Dotcor Good Poster
Posts: 1366
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:01 pm UTC
Location: UK

Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:38 am UTC

Loads.
"Comment is free, but facts are sacred" - C.P. Scott

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Fri Mar 30, 2012 12:40 pm UTC

And there are a fair number of Mennonites in Minnesota.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3819
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Sat Apr 07, 2012 4:12 am UTC

emceng wrote:And there are a fair number of Mennonites in Minnesota.

There are quite a few Mennonites in Iowa, too, if not more than in Minnesota.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks
BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE

jasc15
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:53 pm UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby jasc15 » Mon Apr 16, 2012 2:30 pm UTC

On the topic of Michigan/Detroit: Is Windsor, Ontario anything like Detroit? They are practically the same city, geographically, and I wonder if the social and economic realities are effected much, or not at all by the international border between the two.

User avatar
Zamfir
I built a novelty castle, the irony was lost on some.
Posts: 7604
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 2:43 pm UTC
Location: Nederland

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Zamfir » Mon Apr 16, 2012 2:48 pm UTC

In some weird twist, Dutch mennonites are among the most free-minded (not sure about the english word here) streams of christianity in the country. As in, they have female ministers, gay marriages, and a majority of them does not consider Christ as the son of god, or the bible as the word of god.

User avatar
zombie_monkey
Posts: 644
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:26 pm UTC
Location: Bulgaria

Re: Questions For The World

Postby zombie_monkey » Mon Apr 16, 2012 3:38 pm UTC

Zamfir wrote:(not sure about the english word here) streams of christianity

Denomination.

User avatar
Zamfir
I built a novelty castle, the irony was lost on some.
Posts: 7604
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 2:43 pm UTC
Location: Nederland

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Zamfir » Mon Apr 16, 2012 4:03 pm UTC

No, for freeminded. It's a particular durch word, 'vrijzinnig', used for protestant groups. Liberal or progressive would probably be best, but those carry other connotations that are not quite as intended.

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Mon Apr 16, 2012 4:11 pm UTC

Yeah, liberal or progressive would be accurate, if they didn't have baggage.

Maybe non-dogmatic, or free-thinking.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

User avatar
Shro
science genius girl
Posts: 2139
Joined: Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:31 am UTC
Location: im in ur heartz, stealin ur luv.
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Shro » Mon Apr 16, 2012 5:35 pm UTC

Denomination = "stream of christianity"

Probably the most "free-thinking/open-minded" Christian denomination in the US = Unitarian Universalists.
argyl3: My idea of being a rebel is splitting infinitives.
Alisto: Rebel without a clause?

I made this thing:
www.justthetipcalculator.com

eaglewings51
Posts: 90
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2011 6:40 am UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby eaglewings51 » Mon Apr 16, 2012 10:28 pm UTC

Ieatsoap6 wrote:A question:
To me, an American, a British or Australian accent sounds really weird. It also sounds like other Americans have no accent. Is this true in other countries? Do all other British people sound pretty much the same? Probably a stupid question, but still...


Well, I don't know about the UK but I know that all Spanish speakers don't all sound the same. I've been to Peru, Guatemala, and Ecuador and our group had Spanish translators. When we were in Ecuador, I remember talking with the translators and they would joke (much as we do in the US) "Ooh, I can do an Argentina accent" and then speak Spanish with an Argentinean accent. Or they'd be like "I'm working on doing Chile but I can't do it very well". So Spanish speakers can definitely differentiate by country. In addition, there are different words that mean the same thing (like pop and soda in the US) in Spanish speaking countries.

I have a question for people from Britain. What do you call your country? Specifically the part that is often referred to as England or Britain. I know that the UK is Great Britain plus Ireland and Scotland (I'm pretty sure) but what is the name for just the part that used to be (still is?) referred to as England? Do you call it England? Great Britain? Britain? I have often wondered what exactly it is and whenever I say something, I'm often afraid I'm being horribly politically incorrect.

User avatar
TimelordSimone
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:05 pm UTC
Location: Cambridge ish

Re: Questions For The World

Postby TimelordSimone » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:15 pm UTC

eaglewings51 wrote:I have a question for people from Britain. What do you call your country? Specifically the part that is often referred to as England or Britain. I know that the UK is Great Britain plus Ireland and Scotland (I'm pretty sure) but what is the name for just the part that used to be (still is?) referred to as England? Do you call it England? Great Britain? Britain? I have often wondered what exactly it is and whenever I say something, I'm often afraid I'm being horribly politically incorrect.


England is England. Britain/Great Britain is England, Scotland, and Wales. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is self explanatory. The British Isles is the UK and the Republic of Ireland.

Here is a diagram:
Image

Just never say to a Welsh or Scottish person 'Oh so you're from England?' and you should be fine.
I mostly lurk. Hello.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4756
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:39 pm UTC

You silly folks actually make a distinction between "British Isles" and "British Islands"? Yipes.
The Supreme Ethical Rule: Act so as to elicit the best in others and thereby in thyself.
- Felix Adler, professor, lecturer, and reformer (13 Aug 1851-1933)

User avatar
TimelordSimone
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:05 pm UTC
Location: Cambridge ish

Re: Questions For The World

Postby TimelordSimone » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:43 pm UTC

poxic wrote:You silly folks actually make a distinction between "British Isles" and "British Islands"? Yipes.

Yeah, that was new to me too. I suppose it is to make clear that things like the Isle of Man are part of 'Britain' rather than part of 'Ireland', or something.
I mostly lurk. Hello.

User avatar
Whelan
Posts: 2214
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:16 pm UTC
Location: Londonshire.

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Whelan » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:48 pm UTC

Wait, the Isle of Man is a real place? I thought it was like Sodor.
"I like to be understood whenever I open my mouth; I have a horror of blinding people with science"- Richard Dawkins
Weeks wrote:
TaintedDeity wrote:And all I get is this tame space dragon. Where's my recognition?!
A tame dragon is its own reward.

crowey
That's DOCTOR Crowey, to you
Posts: 1603
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2008 10:52 pm UTC
Location: UK

Re: Questions For The World

Postby crowey » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:49 pm UTC

poxic wrote:You silly folks actually make a distinction between "British Isles" and "British Islands"? Yipes.

One is a geographic descriptor and the other is a political thingy. For example, the Isle of Man is a crown dependency, which means it's got the Queen as official head of state, but it sets it's own laws and stuff and isn't part of the United Kingdom, but it is a British Island, in that it belongs to the political grouping of things that are owned by the queen.
Ireland is part of the geographic collection known as the British Isles, but has no political allegiance to the queen.

edit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminolog ... tish_Isles it's complex, yo.

User avatar
TimelordSimone
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:05 pm UTC
Location: Cambridge ish

Re: Questions For The World

Postby TimelordSimone » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:53 pm UTC

Whelan wrote:Wait, the Isle of Man is a real place? I thought it was like Sodor.

What, you thought just because of the three legged wheel thing and the tailless cats it was fictional? Pfft.

(Crowey explained the isles/islands thing way better than me.)
I mostly lurk. Hello.

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:16 am UTC

I'm from England and would describe myself as 'British' or 'English', and either 'from the UK' or 'from England', depending on the context. You might have minor problems with some brits if you call them 'British' rather than 'English', 'Scottish', 'Welsh', &c., but it shouldn't be a big deal, and most won't mind at all, or will actively favour the 'British' descriptor - the biggest group that might object would be hardcore Scottish secessionists.

As for what I call the country in general, it depends which bit I'm referring to - see the diagram Simone linked.

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Mon Apr 23, 2012 1:39 pm UTC

Ok, so I read this comic the weekend and wondered: what do they call "gentlemen's clubs" in other countries. Here the are also known as strip clubs.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

User avatar
ConMan
Shepherd's Pie?
Posts: 1691
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:56 am UTC
Location: Beacon Alpha

Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:33 pm UTC

We have both - generally the "gentleman's clubs" are the strip clubs that are (pretending to be) a bit classier.
pollywog wrote:
Wikihow wrote:* Smile a lot! Give a gay girl a knowing "Hey, I'm a lesbian too!" smile.
I want to learn this smile, perfect it, and then go around smiling at lesbians and freaking them out.

User avatar
Zarq
Posts: 1993
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 7:29 pm UTC
Location: Third Rock from Earth's Yellow Sun

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Zarq » Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:15 am UTC

I'm not sure if this is really location related, but it is something that I've seen a wide range of answers to: how many times do you change pants? (specifically jeans). I've seen answers ranging from "Jeans need to be washed?" to "Every day, two days max" (and some guy saying girls look funny at you if you mention you wear jeans more than once between washings).

Me: 1-2 times a week. Let's say 3 times in two weeks. (Location: Belgium)
You rang?

"It is better to shit yourself, than to die of constipation." - Some picture on reddit

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3819
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:45 am UTC

I wash mine about once a week.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks
BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE

User avatar
ShootTheChicken
Best. Cheerleader. Ever.
Posts: 433
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:11 am UTC
Location: America's Hat

Re: Questions For The World

Postby ShootTheChicken » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:43 am UTC

My favourite-est pair of jeans are a pair of really dark Levi's. Bought them 16 months ago and haven't washed them yet. I wear them 2-3 times a week. They're the most unbe-fucking-lievably comfortable things on the planet. You should try it some time. Buy really nice jeans and NEVER wash them.
SecondTalon wrote:the Hot Freshness of Wicked Classic.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4756
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:58 am UTC

Apparently jeans can be tossed in the freezer for ~24 hours if they start to get stinky. Kills the stink bacteria.

I tend to wash most trousers after a couple of wears. Clothes that get hopelessly wrinkly after one wear, or which are worn in smelly places (around smokers, for example) get washed after one wrinkly/smelly event. Those that require dry cleaning are usually worn as many times as possible first, until they're about set to walk around by themselves.
The Supreme Ethical Rule: Act so as to elicit the best in others and thereby in thyself.
- Felix Adler, professor, lecturer, and reformer (13 Aug 1851-1933)

User avatar
jawdisorder
Posts: 195
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:44 am UTC
Location: Badgerland

Re: Questions For The World

Postby jawdisorder » Fri Apr 27, 2012 7:48 pm UTC

I'll generally wear the same pair of jeans for a week or two before washing them. They generally aren't even noticeably dirty/smelly at that point I just figure I might as well.

gorcee
Posts: 1501
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 3:14 am UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby gorcee » Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:01 pm UTC

2-3 wears between washings for pants. Less if I manage to get food on them (which I typically manage to do).

jasc15
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:53 pm UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby jasc15 » Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:12 pm UTC

ShootTheChicken wrote:My favourite-est pair of jeans are a pair of really dark Levi's. Bought them 16 months ago and haven't washed them yet. I wear them 2-3 times a week. They're the most unbe-fucking-lievably comfortable things on the planet. You should try it some time. Buy really nice jeans and NEVER wash them.

Glad I'm not alone. I can't remember the last time I washed my jeans, or any pair of pants for that matter. Maybe every six months, usually less frequently, I will dry clean my work pants, but I rarely wash them. They go right back on a hanger when I get home from work.

User avatar
ShootTheChicken
Best. Cheerleader. Ever.
Posts: 433
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:11 am UTC
Location: America's Hat

Re: Questions For The World

Postby ShootTheChicken » Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:21 pm UTC

I wash pants if they get dirty, or if they get too loose. But my jeans are sacred.
SecondTalon wrote:the Hot Freshness of Wicked Classic.

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Fri May 11, 2012 1:55 am UTC

I very rarely dry clean my work (suit) trousers. Jeans, maybe once every month or so, or if I get them dirty?

eaglewings51
Posts: 90
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2011 6:40 am UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby eaglewings51 » Fri May 11, 2012 2:25 am UTC

I don't wash my jeans very often. It used to be whenever they got noticeably dirty/stinky which, surprisingly, isn't near so often as one would think. It usually added up to about once a week which meant usually seven wears because I tend to wear the same pair for a week and then switch to another pair for a week.

Now, I try to wash more often, about every three wears or so. I'm been running trying to lose a few pounds so I'm kind of in an in between size right now: not small enough to order the next size smaller and too small for my current size. So I wash them in hot water to shrink them but after two or three wears, they've stretched back to the original size and are a bit baggy.

As for nice pants, I have a pair of tan and a pair of black slacks/trouser-type pants. I never wash them and I've had them for over a year. That's probably because I've only worn them about three times each. I try to get by with wearing dark jeans, nice shoes, and a nice blouse for most events. I do love my jeans.

Skirts: I pretty much never wash unless they get dirty, which is rare. I have skirts I've worn thirty or forty times and have never washed. I only wear skirts if I'm dressing up which means I'm usually in heels and not running around getting sweaty or doing anything that involves getting dirty.

I live in the US, I'm a girl, and my pants/bottoms washing habits seem to be pretty normal for the crowds I run with.

User avatar
Hofstadter'sLaw
Posts: 154
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:09 am UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Hofstadter'sLaw » Fri May 11, 2012 3:46 am UTC

ShootTheChicken wrote:My favourite-est pair of jeans are a pair of really dark Levi's. Bought them 16 months ago and haven't washed them yet. I wear them 2-3 times a week. They're the most unbe-fucking-lievably comfortable things on the planet. You should try it some time. Buy really nice jeans and NEVER wash them.

I don't think I could never wash a pair of pants. Just thinking of all the skin oil, dead skin cells, sweat, germs, etc...that would accumulate over a few weeks would gross me out. =/

Any pants that I wear mostly outside of my house (work, school, shopping, hanging out somewhere) get worn about seven to ten times before I wash them unless I get them dirty somehow.

Pants I wear just at home (on days off, at night because I want to sit/lay around without getting my other pants wrinkled) end up getting washed after two or three weeks of wear.

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Fri May 11, 2012 4:19 am UTC

Adacore wrote:I very rarely dry clean my work (suit) trousers. Jeans, maybe once every month or so, or if I get them dirty?

I should revise this, actually - it's true for the UK and for winter here in Korea, but in the summer I wash my casual trousers way more often, because it's so goddamn hot and they get much sweatier.

User avatar
meridian
Posts: 367
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2008 12:26 am UTC
Location: Cambervillia
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby meridian » Fri May 11, 2012 12:49 pm UTC

Gendered thoughts on jeans:
Spoiler:
At least in the US, I think people who wear jeans in the current men's style could get away with never washing them, if they wear clean undergarments and take care of them. Current women's style jeans spend way too much time close to the groin, form fitting and snug, in such a way that they can encourage the skin around that area to produce more oil and sweat, things that will transfer to the denim no matter how often the undergarments are changed. In addition, the female organs have a tendency to stay moist where male organs do not seem to have this issue. Bodies vary, oil, sweat, and other fluids are dispense in various quantities, so there's not firm answer, but for me, if I only have about 5 uses on a pair of jeans, then they need to be washed.
Spoiler:
People don't really go to heaven when they die. They are taken to a special room and burned.
- Sherlock
torontoraptor wrote:Internet is a zombie, and it is eating our brains.

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Fri May 11, 2012 1:26 pm UTC

Pants/slacks - not sure. When they get dirty I guess. I've been lazy and just worn jeans constantly the past few months. I wash them either when they need it(stinky/dirty) or when I'm doing laundry and remember to do so.

One thing I really notice is if they haven't been washed recently, they'll feel funny, especially around the lower end of the front pockets. Maybe I'm rubbing my hands there and leave grease/oil? Anyway, if I go too long without washing them, that area feels funny/gross. They also start to smell after a few weeks without a wash, and that drives me crazy.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Mon Jun 04, 2012 12:55 am UTC

Question! Payment methods, especially for things online.

In the UK, the two standards for online payment are credit card and debit card payments. Normally both are accepted, and almost everyone in the UK has at least one of each. In Korea, one of the most common methods appears to be direct bank transfer - vendors give you a bank name and account number and you manually do the transfer from your bank (either from their website, or using pretty much any ATM). You tell the vendor your name and account number in return, so they can match the incoming transfer with the transaction. This system seems really weird to me - does it (or something similar) exist elsewhere?

I believe the most common system in mainland Europe is debit card-based, whereas in the US it's mostly credit cards? How does online payment work in other places?

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3819
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:10 am UTC

The Korean system you describe sounds like what we in America call eChecks. Basically, you give the company the routing number (which identifies the bank) and the account number. This is how I pay my monthly rent. This is also how PayPal usually works, though you can set PayPal to use your credit or debit card instead of a direct transfer from your bank account.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks
BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE

User avatar
Steax
SecondTalon's Goon Squad
Posts: 3038
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 12:18 pm UTC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Steax » Mon Jun 04, 2012 2:22 am UTC

Adacore wrote:Question! Payment methods, especially for things online.

In the UK, the two standards for online payment are credit card and debit card payments. Normally both are accepted, and almost everyone in the UK has at least one of each. In Korea, one of the most common methods appears to be direct bank transfer - vendors give you a bank name and account number and you manually do the transfer from your bank (either from their website, or using pretty much any ATM). You tell the vendor your name and account number in return, so they can match the incoming transfer with the transaction. This system seems really weird to me - does it (or something similar) exist elsewhere?

I believe the most common system in mainland Europe is debit card-based, whereas in the US it's mostly credit cards? How does online payment work in other places?


I think it has to do with how well the bank system embraces small businesses. Europe and the US have been relatively quick to adopt them, and it's pretty straightforward to support cards. In many places, especially developing economies like here in southeast Asia, it's much more fragmented with certain companies releasing their own special cards, credit card fees being too much for small businesses, and a general lack of standards.

As a result, most small businesses here also only accept direct account-to-account payment. It's the only standard everyone agrees to.
In Minecraft, I use the username Rirez.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests