Questions For The World

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

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e^iπ+1=0
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby e^iπ+1=0 » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:03 pm UTC

Yes. A burrito is a rolled up tube of stuff, whereas a taco is just folded in half. That, and the fact that tacos can be hard or soft shell whereas burritos are fairly necessarily soft, is pretty much the only difference.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:10 pm UTC

e^iπ+1=0 wrote:burritos are fairly necessarily soft

Until you deep fry that thing, love a chimichanga.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby setzer777 » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:11 pm UTC

I suppose putting very atypical foods inside the tortilla makes it more likely to be called a "wrap" rather than a burrito. At my college there was this cafe with amazing sliced turkey + bacon strip wraps.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:13 pm UTC

roband wrote:The difference comes down to the overlap!?

Mexican food is complicated
Not really.

Taco - folded tortilla, can be fried or not.
Burrito - unfried torilla wrap, usually closed ends
Enchilada - unfried tortilla roll (open ended) with sauce
Taquito - small fried totilla roll.
Chimichanga - fried tortilla wrap, closed ends, basically deed-fried burrito, can have sauce
Tostada - flat fried tortilla
Chalupa - Tostada variant, fried tortilla is in vaguely bowl-shape
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:15 pm UTC

Quesadilla!

Erm, yeah, but the difference between a fold and a wrap is potentially minute.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:22 pm UTC

Quesadilla - large tortilla (to the taco's small) unfried but heat pressed
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:26 pm UTC

You get decent Mexican food in Kentucky?

Just looked at a map, you're not as far south as I assumed.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:33 pm UTC

Like many places in the US, we had representative Mexican until the mid 90s when immigration restrictions went a bit more lax, NAFTA, better migrant worker permits, etc. After that, Mexican joints started popping up all over the place, of varying qualities. The better ones are still around, naturally.

Of course, arguing what qualifies as "Mexican" in America is .. an interesting prospect. It's not quite as alien as Americanized Chinese, but that is a useful comparison. I recall enjoying what I eat now more than what I had in Mexico, but at the same time I was.. 8 or something the last time I was in Mexico. I think I still enjoyed McDonalds when I was 8.

But there are Mexican restaurants run by Mexican immigrants to which I'd willingly eat at repeatedly. One of the highlights of going back to my hometown is stopping in at the Mexican place there that's been there for ... 18 years? Something like that.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby setzer777 » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:51 pm UTC

Speaking of fast food burgers, I didn't realize until recently that Whataburger is only in the southern United States (same with Blue Bell ice cream). It certainly beats the hell out of McDonalds or Burger King.

I was also surprised to learn that Dr Pepper isn't nearly as popular in the north. In Texas I think it might outsell Coke, and I think it easily outsells Pepsi and RC Cola (I see RC Cola on shelves here, but I doubt I've ever seen someone actually buy it).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:23 pm UTC

Living in southern California myself, the kind of stuff shown on TV looks exactly like the kind of stuff I see in real life.

Well, except for middle-class families living in two-story houses with spacious yards. That shit's reserved for millionaires here.

(Which I guess means there's a lot of millionaires here because there's miles and miles of exactly that kind of housing all over the damn place).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ahammel » Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:33 pm UTC

According to Mark Bittman, the taco is Mexican in origin, while the burrito is American.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Jumble » Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:07 pm UTC

330 miles. About 6 hours by car (with wife, 2 kids and dog) or 6 hours & £27,000 by train. I try to call every week but I'm not always that good. Childhood is all about guilt, and some times it carries on for 50+ years.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Zarq » Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:31 pm UTC

Jumble wrote: £27,000 by train.


Holy hell. It's like American medicine.

edit: that's an exaggeration for comedic purposes, right?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Jumble » Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:51 pm UTC

Err, yeah, a bit. However, when I was a kid (450 years ago (more comedic exaggeration)) I could get from my parents in Penzance to London in 4 hours 20 min for £36. Now it takes nearly 6 hours and > £450 if I take a family of four. Or I can drive for £60 of fuel and I get to use the car in Cornwall, a county where public transport timetables work by calendar and moon cycle, rather than clock. Progress in action.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby fizzgig » Sun Oct 06, 2013 6:42 am UTC

So, in Australia, if you have a map of the world, the Pacific Ocean is in the middle (conveniently placing Australia near the middle of the map). However, everyone else seems to have the Atlantic Ocean/Europe/Africa in the middle (if a quick Google Image search is anything to go by). So, my question to you - does anybody else use the Pacific-in-the-middle version?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Suzaku » Sun Oct 06, 2013 8:22 am UTC

Japan does, I think (don't have one to hand right now).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby quetzal1234 » Sun Oct 06, 2013 9:55 pm UTC

I sometimes see them here. However, they're generally pointed out as pacific-centric and hence unusual.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:34 pm UTC

As opposed to all the Atlantic-centric ones, which are normal?

Wow, our maps are seaist. Also, living north of the US means I see a lot of maps with the Americas in the middle, splitting Eurasia off to each edge.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bluebambue » Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:37 pm UTC

poxic wrote:... living north of the US means I see a lot of maps with the Americas in the middle, splitting Eurasia off to each edge.
I live in the US, and I've seen very few maps like that.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:38 pm UTC

Maybe it was an '80s thing. Now that I think of it, I tend to see Pacific-centric and Atlantic-centric ones about equally these days.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:25 pm UTC

I basically never saw a map that wasn't Euro-centred until I came to Korea. Pacific-centred maps are in the definite majority here, but Euro-centred maps aren't uncommon - see a google image search for 세계지도 ('world map' in Korean).

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roband wrote:See, that's another difference. We BBQ, but we flip and poke and prod.

As I said, the terminology is ambiguous. Even in the US.

Using a device like this is commonly called Barbequing in the English Speaking World outside of the US, universally called Grilling within the US... and sometimes called Barbequing in the US.

Going back a bit to this, the main terminology difference that confuses me/my American friends when I talk to them about cooking food is not 'barbecue' but 'grilling'. In the UK, at least, if you say you are grilling food, then you are placing it under the direct heat element of a combined oven/grill, which I believe in the US is referred to as 'broiling' (a term that most Brits never use, and would have trouble defining). Thus, 'grilled cheese sandwiches' really confused me for a bit, because (a) if you're using a UK-style grill, cheese on toast (an open sandwich, I guess) works better than a closed sandwich, and (b) my American friends were using a frying pan, which is definitely not 'grilling', to me, that's 'frying'.

Also, the flat metal heated plate for cooking meat is extremely common in Korean cooking. By far the most common variety of restaurant here is 'korean barbecue', with a central metal hotplate (either gas or charcoal) on each table.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby quetzal1234 » Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:47 pm UTC

poxic wrote:As opposed to all the Atlantic-centric ones, which are normal?

Wow, our maps are seaist. Also, living north of the US means I see a lot of maps with the Americas in the middle, splitting Eurasia off to each edge.

Essentially yes. A lot of the ones I've seen come with a blurb that says how the pacific countries are becoming more powerful so we should pay more attention to them. Terrible, I know.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby yurell » Mon Oct 07, 2013 11:28 pm UTC

Adacore wrote:Going back a bit to this, the main terminology difference that confuses me/my American friends when I talk to them about cooking food is not 'barbecue' but 'grilling'. In the UK, at least, if you say you are grilling food, then you are placing it under the direct heat element of a combined oven/grill, which I believe in the US is referred to as 'broiling' (a term that most Brits never use, and would have trouble defining). Thus, 'grilled cheese sandwiches' really confused me for a bit, because (a) if you're using a UK-style grill, cheese on toast (an open sandwich, I guess) works better than a closed sandwich, and (b) my American friends were using a frying pan, which is definitely not 'grilling', to me, that's 'frying'.


The UK usage is also dominant in Australia, too. The idea that one grills something in a frypan boggles the mind.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby PolakoVoador » Tue Oct 08, 2013 1:48 am UTC

Here in Brazil only Euro-centered maps are used. I like it, because the thing split in half is an ocean, and nobody cares about oceans, so we are good.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Eomund » Wed Oct 09, 2013 1:36 am UTC

I know that Scotland is part of Great Britain, so is it okay/proper to call a Scotsman (or Scotswoman) British?

(I do know that you should never, ever, ever, ever call them English)

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Wed Oct 09, 2013 6:34 am UTC

Eomund wrote:I know that Scotland is part of Great Britain, so is it okay/proper to call a Scotsman (or Scotswoman) British?

Generally yes, it's fine. Some might get offended, but that's their problem, not yours, I would say.

This will no longer be true, I suppose, if they actually secede.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:12 am UTC

Adacore wrote:
Eomund wrote:I know that Scotland is part of Great Britain, so is it okay/proper to call a Scotsman (or Scotswoman) British?

Generally yes, it's fine. Some might get offended, but that's their problem, not yours, I would say.

This will no longer be true, I suppose, if they actually secede.

They'd still be a part of the British Isles. At which point you could call them it and refer to their geographical location, rather than their country.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:17 am UTC

Yeah, but it would become similar to calling Canadians 'American'. It would be technically correct by some measures, but most people would still consider it wrong and think you were a jerk for doing it.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:57 am UTC

North American, maybe.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Rodion Raskolnikov » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:59 am UTC

According to the latest census results (released a few weeks ago), 62 per cent of people living in Scotland felt Scottish only, 18 per cent felt both Scottish and British, and 8.4 per cent felt British only.

But calling us British is correct, and very few people would actually have any issue with it.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Djehutynakht » Sat Oct 12, 2013 1:34 am UTC

Where can I find a picture of Mao Zedong with a shotgun for an arm?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:39 pm UTC

Back to pronunciations: how would you say "Wootton" and where are you from?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby e^iπ+1=0 » Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:55 pm UTC

Never seen the word before, but I'd go with /wutn̩/. From Los Angeles, have spent the past couple years in Lancaster, UK.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bluebambue » Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:59 am UTC

Ditto to not seeing it before. From Seattle, WA, USA

Woo as in Woot or Shoot
ton as in a ton of bricks, though a bit shorter than "ton" by itself.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:52 am UTC

Ditty bluebambue's pronunciation, I'm from Santa Barbara / Ventura (California) area my whole life.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Carlington » Tue Oct 15, 2013 4:48 am UTC

This is what I sound like.
I'm from Australia, and I'd describe myself as falling somewhere between a general and a cultivated Australian accent - although I'd love to hear opinions on that (I've had a number of people tell me that my accent is "neutral" before, and that they weren't sure whether I was Australian or English.)
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:43 am UTC

Carlington wrote:This is what I sound like.
I'm from Australia, and I'd describe myself as falling somewhere between a general and a cultivated Australian accent - although I'd love to hear opinions on that (I've had a number of people tell me that my accent is "neutral" before, and that they weren't sure whether I was Australian or English.)

Clicked and listened before reading the rest of your post, thought to myself "I'm sure this guy was meant to be Australian".

But my only experience of Australian is Neighbours and Fosters adverts, so they clearly turn it up to 11.

I also say Wootton the way you do. It's a place name over here in the UK and is also the surname of one of the contestants on TUF. The voice-over dude (American) pronounced it Woot-un, with a soft t. It sounded really weird to me.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Carlington » Tue Oct 15, 2013 7:22 am UTC

It's a place name here, too. Neighbours doesn't really over-do it at all, I'd describe myself as the atypical one in this case.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby e^iπ+1=0 » Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:08 pm UTC

FWIW, many Americans can't really tell the difference between many English and Australian accents. It took me far longer than it should have to realize that one of my lecturers here is Australian. I can hear the difference now, after living in the UK for a couple years, but I definitely had a tough time of it back when I was in the US.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:34 pm UTC

This might need to be answered by non-English native speakers to get a good perspective but here's my question - when playing a game, or taking turns in a circle, we always pass the turn to the left. Basically, in a 4 player game, play rotates clockwise, from north to east to south to west. Does anyone go in reverse order?
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