Questions For The World

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Oct 02, 2008 6:52 pm UTC

Monty40xi wrote:
electronic mily wrote:New question from me: I'm a US kid, I speak a little French, but from what I can tell almost all languages are spoken much faster than English, to the point where non-native English speakers often speak the language faster than native speakers do. So here's what I was wondering - for those who aren't native English speakers, do you think of English as a "slow" language?
I've been told that our brain inserts pauses on its own when it's hearing its native language. Other languages sound faster than they really are because your brain doesn't know where to insert those pauses. English is still a pretty fast language. Look at your watch and see how many normal sentences take less than one second to say. "Have you seen my keys?" "What are you talking about?" "I feel like a burrito."

Pretty much. Have You Seen My Keys is closer to "havheseen mikeys?" phonetically - at least how I say it. (Yes, I just said it a half-dozen times out loud to make sure I was getting the letters right.) If you didn't know the language, you might think I just said two words.

Iori_Yagami wrote:New related question: Did you ever work in groups? If so, how the load was distributed? In my case, it was usually one 'uber-geek' who did everything (like me :lol: ) and others made a 'busy and serious' face while passing notes under the table... :mrgreen:
From as early as I can recall up to graduation and even in my post-high school schooling, there was always groupwork - either to get people used to working in groups, or because sometimes the goal simply couldn't be accomplished in a reasonable amount of time by one person working alone (Alright, so that's more of college level stuff, but you get the point).

Most of the 1-12 year stuff I did was more or less as you said - I did the "work" while the other people in the group did whatever - sometimes it'd be a collaboration, sometimes it'd just be me. Thing is, I'd always refuse to present it. So if nothing else, whoever was going to do the talking about it had to pay attention enough to pull it off. Couple of groups I was in I recall getting full credit while everyone else didn't get any, because it was obvious they contributed nothing and learned nothing.

Iori_Yagami wrote:Another simpleton question
What is older age associated with in your country? I saw posts in a 'what you will become' thread, and many mentioned that in many years they will be rich, calm, wise and stuff. That's fine and notable, but is it realistic? I heard from a pal that in Western Europe and maybe Japan, for instance, elders are expected to be honored, to be powerful, rich, well-known, and they generally travel A LOT.
Here, if you're old and still in the workforce, it's because either you have nothing better to do or cannot afford to not work. You're generally considered out of touch with modern day life, slow, and slow to learn, which is usually unfounded - I mean, for every 9 people over 60 who can work an ATM fine, the one idiot ruins it for the bunch, leaving the younger folks thinking all old people are .. at best out of touch with technology, and at worst idiots. Though that's how people think of younger folks too.

Take Bob. Bob will likely find that people 10 years older than him are out of touch with technology, slow to learn, and outdated in their thinking. Meanwhile, Bob will also likely find that people 10 years younger than him are dumb as posts, speaking like morons in incomprehensible slang, and overinfatuated with some idiotic fad. Pretty much, everyone gets a 10 year bubble around them, and with exceptions, finds people outside of that range to be stupid for one reason or another. But, of course, THEY weren't like that ten years ago, and they won't be like that in ten years... :roll:

Still, in general, people treat old folks with a certain level of respect, at least to their face. But sometimes it's pretty obvious that it's a patronizing respect.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mavketl » Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:52 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:You're generally considered out of touch with modern day life, slow, and slow to learn, which is usually unfounded

I think it depends on how "old" we're talking about here. Most people I know who are over, say, 80, are out of touch with modern day life, slow, and slow to learn.

My grandparents, for example, are very bright people. They are between 75 and 80 years old. My granddad still does accounting for most of his friends and family, and some long time customers. However, he pretty much can't walk, he is nearly deaf, and his learning and understanding of "new things" is simply not even close to what it used to be. As I said, they are bright people. There are things that I can't explain to them, though, often related with technologies or sociopolitical "new ideas", which seem complete nonsense to them. (Cue "Oh my GOD but you don't KNOW these people they might be axe murderers and... WHAT?! You're meeting them out of the country? PEOPLE YOU DON'T EVEN KNOW?!" when meeting some of my best friends from the Internet.)

That said, I do agree with the gist of your post; old people are often severely underestimated - and the real decline in some abilities is definitely no reason to treat the elderly like idiots.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby pseudoidiot » Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:24 pm UTC

Here's one my wife and I were wondering about over the weekend. What are grammar/spelling problems like in other languages? Are errors as common as they seem to be in English?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:54 pm UTC

pseudoidiot wrote:Here's one my wife and I were wondering about over the weekend. What are grammar/spelling problems like in other languages? Are errors as common as they seem to be in English?

Absolutely.. well, at least from an Irish, German and Polish point of view..

For an example, a lot of words in Polish that are seperate, almost everyone spells them together, causing much frustration to the grammer and spelling guru's. (Bere mnie as "beremnie" etc.)
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Monty40xi » Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:22 pm UTC

KingLoser wrote:
pseudoidiot wrote:Here's one my wife and I were wondering about over the weekend. What are grammar/spelling problems like in other languages? Are errors as common as they seem to be in English?

Absolutely.. well, at least from an Irish, German and Polish point of view..

For an example, a lot of words in Polish that are seperate, almost everyone spells them together, causing much frustration to the grammer and spelling guru's. (Bere mnie as "beremnie" etc.)

How would German and Polish people feel about the term "grammar Nazi"?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:28 pm UTC

Monty40xi wrote:
KingLoser wrote:
pseudoidiot wrote:Here's one my wife and I were wondering about over the weekend. What are grammar/spelling problems like in other languages? Are errors as common as they seem to be in English?

Absolutely.. well, at least from an Irish, German and Polish point of view..

For an example, a lot of words in Polish that are seperate, almost everyone spells them together, causing much frustration to the grammer and spelling guru's. (Bere mnie as "beremnie" etc.)

How would German and Polish people feel about the term "grammar Nazi"?

They don't use it, but it's a no-brainer. Older people are more likely to take offense than the younger, who would just like how well it fits.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby pseudoidiot » Mon Oct 27, 2008 3:20 pm UTC

What about "textspeak"? Is that just an English abomination or have other languages developed something similar?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Alpha Omicron » Mon Oct 27, 2008 4:43 pm UTC

pseudoidiot wrote:...have other languages developed something similar?

I hear that this is the case. I think it was Cantonese, in particular, in the context of IM.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby micco » Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:11 pm UTC

Are blood pancakes common anywhere else? They are like salty pancakes with blood in the dough.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:14 pm UTC

No? In Googling them, I found this :
Finguide wrote:*Bottles of blood for cooking can be found from the frozen food section of the grocery shops in Finland.


Which... is pretty fricken awesome. I'm not aware of any store selling blood for cooking. I believe you may be able to get it if you specifically request it from a slaughterhouse/butchery, but I may be mistaken as that also seems like something the Heath Department would frown on being sold.

But to answer your question, I've never heard of them.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby wst » Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:51 pm UTC

pseudoidiot wrote:What about "textspeak"? Is that just an English abomination or have other languages developed something similar?
Nope. A spanish friend of mine seds 'k wapa?' instead of 'Que quapa?'
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Encarnacion » Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:37 pm UTC

Monty40xi wrote:
Iori_Yagami wrote:Another simpleton question
What is older age associated with in your country? I saw posts in a 'what you will become' thread, and many mentioned that in many years they will be rich, calm, wise and stuff. That's fine and notable, but is it realistic? I heard from a pal that in Western Europe and maybe Japan, for instance, elders are expected to be honored, to be powerful, rich, well-known, and they generally travel A LOT.
Here it is much uglier: old age means poverty, loneliness, deciding whether you should pay for either hot water or your medicines this month, sitting at the bench all day, eating smelly cabbage soup in last grade medical facility with rude nurses and aluminium dishes, selling mushrooms and berries found in forest at improvised marketplace, listening to insults from random street hooligans and bus conductors, and other nasty stuff...

My parents (in their sixties) are wealthy, travel a lot, and spend their days either working part-time for charity organizations they believe in or harrassing us about making them some grandchildren. My dad is also into 100-mile bike races and doing some autocross in his new 300Z. That, pretty much, is what Americans hope their old age to be like. My grandparents are too old to work or travel, but they live together in a little house out in the countryside and spend their time talking to friends and family, or watching TV. They've seen the world, they've raised their kids and grandkids, they've given away their extra savings, they've bought their burial plots and tombstones, and now they're basically waiting to see when they'll die.

Younger people might be mean to the elderly here, but really, you have to be huge jerk to pick on a little old lady. It would be like kicking a puppy.

I'm guessing the poverty of elderly Russians is due to coming from an era where finding a job with a good pension and investing heavily in the stock market were not options.


Like Monty, I am also a US American, but living in Mexico. It should be said that Monty's parents' situation is typical to more wealthy elders, but not the general population. Now, I will be speaking of several cultures here, but first the one that I grew up in, that of caucasians. In the USA, elders will generally retire at the age that they can or that their industry requires (generally around the age of 60) but will stay active in life, spending time with grandchildren (if they have any), traveling, doing things for their favorite charities, and participating in "lighter" sports like golf or tennis. In my home state, Arizona, it is common for those in this stage to move to a Sun City, or some sort of retirement community like it. For many of those in this group there comes a time (generally around the age of 75) at which the individual's health ceases to make this kind of life convenient, so they slow things down a bit. Then life involves more time spent in the hospital or nursing homes, and a lot less time spent doing the activities above. Some do find it difficult to pay for this medical care, but there are many government programs built to help with this, though these programs support the generation presently at this stage but not none younger. Respect for elders varies, from youth resentful that they support the government programs from which they themselves will not likely benefit, to youth who were taught from an early age to respect elders.

For those of other cultures that I have seen, in particular that of Mexico and Mexican Americans, retirement may come a little later (around 65-70) and family involvement is much higher. It is not at all uncommon for a grandparent of this age to have their children or/and grandchildren living with them at least part of the year, if not, the three or more generations will see each other at least once a week whenever in the same general locale. Elders in this generation will be very involved with their families and with church participation. When the health of the individual is no longer steady or ideal, the younger generations, not nursing home staff, will provide care for the elders. Respect for elders is relatively high in this culture, though not veneration.

My personal preference of cultures is that which does show respect for its elders. It is a personal lament of mine that my own culture does not show enough respect for elders, ignoring the wisdom they have. I would rather see respect and honor than wealth in any culture.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby NightStar » Mon Nov 10, 2008 10:46 pm UTC

Butting in to say... I happen to think this is one of the best threads we have here at xkcd. In my limited international experience, I was always filled with questions about cultural nuances and nervous about unknowingly violating some cultural taboo. Are there any good sites devoted to this sort of thing? Sort of like a cultural wikipedia? Of course, perceptions on culture are subjective, and no doubt it must be difficult to prevent value judgments in an outside site ("People in X country do Y behavior! How weird is that?"). But with the xkcd fora, people are mostly intelligent and curious, so it's hardly a problem...
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:41 pm UTC

NightStar wrote:Butting in to say... I happen to think this is one of the best threads we have here at xkcd. In my limited international experience, I was always filled with questions about cultural nuances and nervous about unknowingly violating some cultural taboo. Are there any good sites devoted to this sort of thing? Sort of like a cultural wikipedia? Of course, perceptions on culture are subjective, and no doubt it must be difficult to prevent value judgments in an outside site ("People in X country do Y behavior! How weird is that?"). But with the xkcd fora, people are mostly intelligent and curious, so it's hardly a problem...

You could try Wikitravel. Wikipedia is not a guidebook, but that site is.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Iori_Yagami » Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:10 pm UTC

Ahh, time for new questions.

1. For everyone, just please note the part of the world or country you are in, so that response would be helpful. In 90s, in Russia and, probably other related countries, with wild growth of information from 'outside', many youth subcultures emerged. Of course, many of them were nothing more than flashy copycats, who mostly imitated the looks (since genuinity requires first-hand experience with the 'roots', and not MTV). Well, one of the particularly notable things was the utmost hostility between so-called 'metallers' and 'rappers'. Well, you probably know the musical and stylish differences (unless you are over 50 :P ), but what about quarrels and fights? I remember whole gangs gathering for a 'grand slam' in city outskirts to 'prove who's the real one'. One of the most frightening questions at school yard was 'what are you listening to? To that shitty metal/rap or real music - rap/metal?' And you better answer 'correctly'! :cry: Now I wonder - was metal - rap antagonism taken from Western World or was it a pure 90s Russian silly teenager invention? :?

2. For US. Please don't kick me, but explain me one thing.. In many countries news often show protests, demonstrations, riots and the like. I, however, never saw anything from them States. Why is that? Am I just inattentive, or maybe everything is so fine that everyone is so happy they would never come out with placards '%politician%' is a thief and killer' or 'freedom without money is an illusion' and throw eggs at some establishment's building? Or maybe it is not reported, and the active ones are labeled 'terrorists' and shot on the spot? :?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:17 pm UTC

1. Rappers were/are too busy quarreling with each other to have giant feuds with other genres, generally speaking. As far as cities go, maybe there's some problems with idiot teens and the like, but idiots are idiots and dangerous parts of town are dangerous parts of town. Everything else is just an excuse.

2. Sure there's protests. But the massive protests with police opening fire on the rioting crowds were *mostly* done with by the ends of the Vietnam War. Every now and again you get some crap going on, but for the most part cops just show up and make sure protesters just wave signs and chant.

Generally speaking Cops know well enough to not open fire with rubber bullets on a crowd of protesters as, no matter what, they'll be seen as jackbooted thugs. And generally speaking protesters know not to physically attack people as they'll be seen as idiot, violent protesters who deserved it.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:28 pm UTC

Yeah, protesting is a protected right here, so we do get several. I was in Washington D.C. last summer and you could see several small groups of people just randomly holding signs/distributing information. No big deal, no special occasion.

It's important to realize that the U.S. is a really big country, and that causes problems for national news. "Protesters outside White House" isn't a big deal, so it won't make the news unless it turns violent, which is rare.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:29 pm UTC

It's.. also common.

"Protesters outside of White House! Also in breaking news, Fire hot, water wet."
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby benjhuey » Mon Mar 16, 2009 12:23 am UTC

Yeah, we have a bunch of sign waving and chanting, but things rarely escalate. Also, I don't remember the last time a group of protesters here set a car on fire (I'm looking at you, France).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Bubbles McCoy » Mon Mar 16, 2009 1:08 am UTC

It's been known to happen. But yeah, for the most part nothing too serious.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Chuff » Mon Mar 16, 2009 1:34 am UTC

For people in parts of Canada other than Ontario and Alberta: Do you hate Ontario as much as most of Alberta does? Or is that just us because of the whole regulating oil thing?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby benjhuey » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:43 am UTC

Bubbles McCoy wrote:It's been known to happen. But yeah, for the most part nothing too serious.
I guess it just proves what Sir_Elderberry said about America being such a large country because I failed to hear about it.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:44 am UTC

I've mostly just noticed annoyance at Ontario here in BC, partly because of the Upper Canada-centrism ("Ontario = Canada and the rest of you guys are just regions"), and partly because of the massive wave of migration from there to Vancouver over the last ten years or so. They even brought Tim Horton's with them, dammit.

OK, we had Timmy's before then, but only a few. Now they're freakin' everywhere, and I just don't see the appeal.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Alpha Omicron » Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:07 am UTC

poxic wrote:OK, we had Timmy's before then, but only a few. Now they're freakin' everywhere, and I just don't see the appeal.

You really prefer Starbucks?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:33 am UTC

Alpha Omicron wrote:
poxic wrote:OK, we had Timmy's before then, but only a few. Now they're freakin' everywhere, and I just don't see the appeal.

You really prefer Starbucks?

Not sure, but Tim Horton's is the only coffee I have ever actually thrown out without bothering to finish it. I haven't been into a starbucks, though. In my defense I only went into the Tim Horton's because I was at Vancouver airport at 6:30am and -really- needed a coffee.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Alpha Omicron » Mon Mar 16, 2009 4:37 am UTC

Tim Hortons is good for their soup and doughnuts. I don't mind their coffee. If I want coffee for coffee's sake, then I seek out some independent place.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Surgery » Mon Mar 16, 2009 5:28 am UTC

Timmy Ho fails at coffee, but they do everything else pretty good. You can't beat a dozen doughnut holes for a couple bucks.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Chuff » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:06 am UTC

I love tims, but I don't drink coffee. I just love that I can get about 5 times as much value out of my money there. Also, the doughnuts are amazing. Honey Crullers ftw!
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:26 am UTC

Iori_Yagami wrote:Ahh, time for new questions.

1. Music gang types.


The UK has a history of this type of violence going back to the 50's, with various groups as fashions change. Here's a quick outline of the groups, all of them used to go round knocking the crap out of each other, except the Hippies.

1950s's
Teddy Boys - Basically the original 'teenagers' in the UK, teens caring about popular music and having a specific fashion.
The Rockers (early Elvis Presley type) developed out of the Teddy Boys from american rockabilly influences. see The Wild One

1960s:
Mods - tight suits, italian mopeds, big Parkas. Main band was probably The Who, see 'Quanrophenia' for info about violence between mods and rockers.
Rockers Motorbikes and Elvis Presly type rock.
Article
Skinheads - develped by the working class out of the mod scene, heavily influenced by immigrants from the west Indies and Carribean, before they went all racist in the 70's.
Hippies started up. Didn't do much fighting though.

1970's, music based groups didnt fight each other so much any more, most conflict with youths based around politics so most were fight against the police and Thatcher.
Rockers/Metallers - Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath (metal) Deep Purple,Pink Floyd (progressive rock) etc. My dad was one back in the day. Probably the ones least bothered by politics.
Skinheads were still going, although now more politicised either to the left or right. Mostly went around beating up Pakistani kids. . . or anyone who looked at them funny. See 'This is England' for more info.
The rise of [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punk_subculturePunk[/url] crap music, dodgy haircuts and anti-establishment.
The Hippies had pretty much faded by the mid 70's.

1980's. Fighting over music had pretty much died down as Football Violence had been invented.

1990's. No real fighting over music, organised group violence was still based around football. Although it was a big thing whether you were a fan of [urlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blur_(band)]Blur[/url] or Oasis. As well as West/East coast rap stuff in the US.

2000's. Fighting within music is just about dead really in the UK. We seem to do our fighting after the clubs close (women as much as the men these days sadly) or in Afghan lol. I do know that there has been gang violence at metal festivals in the US though.

There has never really been a rap/metal antagonism in the UK as far as I'm aware. Both groups mutually dislike each others music but keep out of each others way, this is also tied into ethnic divisions and to a lesser extent economic divisions in society though. I'm quite intrigued by this scenario you're describing. Was there much of a "teen culture" during Soviet years? or is this a new thing coming out of western influence?
I suppose in the next few years Eastern Europe will probably start coming out with its own influenced stuff the way other cultures have, which will either be cheesy as hell or pretty interesting.

I was going to link the Spetsnatz rap video here but its been taken down. Shame.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Iori_Yagami » Mon Mar 16, 2009 7:30 am UTC

As for Soviet 'teen culture', I seriously doubt anything existed - since music was very limited. It was mostly 'approved' groups singing about 'my wonderful country', love & friendship, patriotic war songs, and some others. Many western groups were even forbidden for 'violence propaganda', 'lustful way of life propaganda', and so on. Besides, it was difficult to find records - they were usually smuggled. I actually have a UB40 (jamaican?, reggae?) record somewhere in the drawers. I was too little to experience that period myself, actually. During late 80s and 90s, 'iron curtain' fell, and teenagers were sunk in the rushing sea of excellent, mediocre and cheesy movies, music, media. Kids were no longer playing 'we VS. nazis' gun games in the yard - it was Terminator or Bruce Lee instead. Naturally many things were liked exactly because they were new and seemed somewhat rebellious - only years later you understood that this all is the craftsmanship of so called 'show business'. Of course, groups emerged - mostly mimicking what they saw, heard and read.
As for metal/rap - it was the most prominent conflict, I don't remember anything else that was so intense and widespread. Now I am amused to find out nothing of sorts ever existed in the West. One of the most believable explanations is the absense of 'roots', so people going to the same school and class could easily find themselves on opposing sides, whereas in the West they rarely ever met and existed in 'parallel planes'.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Ralith The Third » Wed Mar 18, 2009 9:00 pm UTC

Freakish wrote:How are Atheists treated in Southern USA?
Is it really that hard adjusting to driving on snow in places where you don't see it often?


@ the atheists, it's more of a.. ,"Oh. You're an atheist?"
and sometimes attempted conversion occurs. Annoying, but it's the same everywhere.

@Snow, not if you know how... although very few people do. Just do everything... slowly. Accelerate slowly, brake slowly, turn slowly. Etc.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dingbats » Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:50 pm UTC

I'm reviving this thread to ask about a thing I've been wondering about.

In the US, where you don't use the metric system, is the inch the smallest length unit you use? How do you refer to lengths on the order of a millimeter? Like the size of a grain of sand or a tick?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby icanus » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:02 pm UTC

Dingbats wrote:In the US, where you don't use the metric system, is the inch the smallest length unit you use? How do you refer to lengths on the order of a millimeter? Like the size of a grain of sand or a tick?

Assuming it's the same as pre-metric UK usage, fractions of an inch. 1/8, 1/16 and 1/20 of an inch were commonly used increments, I believe.

(Not in the US, but my Grandad tells all his anecdotes about his work as an army mechanic in Imperial units.)

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby JBJ » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:04 pm UTC

Dingbats wrote:I'm reviving this thread to ask about a thing I've been wondering about.

In the US, where you don't use the metric system, is the inch the smallest length unit you use? How do you refer to lengths on the order of a millimeter? Like the size of a grain of sand or a tick?

Fractions of an inch. And just to keep it really interesting, the denominator is in 16ths of an inch (with fractions reduced, i.e. 6/16 = 3/8)
Of course, the smallest fraction normally used, 1/16 inch is still slightly larger than 1mm (1.5875 mm) but close enough for practical purposes. If precision is a requirement on that scale, we'll switch to millimeters. The US is actually pretty metric friendly. We just prefer Imperial units for everyday usage.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:08 pm UTC

Dingbats wrote:I'm reviving this thread to ask about a thing I've been wondering about.

In the US, where you don't use the metric system, is the inch the smallest length unit you use? How do you refer to lengths on the order of a millimeter? Like the size of a grain of sand or a tick?

Inches/feet is the most common measurement for length, but for people our age (20), I think we will use and can understand millimeters and centimeters for really small things. I would refer to the thickness of a packet of papers in milmeters, personally. I doubt that either of my parents know the metric system (they are about age fifty) Otherwise we can just use fractions of inches. There aren't many occasions where people talk about such small lengths in a casual atmosphere. In the schools (when I went, at least) we have to use metric.

I think Americans have a much better grasp on the units for length than anything else. I know how much a liter is, and can kinda guess the volume of a liquid just by looking, though not very well. If you place an object in my hand, I won't be able to tell you how many grams it is with any good accuracy. I personally suck with Celsius, but I can do it in my head.

Ninja'd.

Yeah, imperial for everyday conversation. We are metric friendly in schools and probably industry (not sure about that). I often just metric into imperial, but I don't have to with length.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dingbats » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:37 pm UTC

sje46 wrote:If you place an object in my hand, I won't be able to tell you how many grams it is with any good accuracy.

Oh, me neither :roll:

But okay, fractions of an inch makes sense.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby crowey » Mon Aug 31, 2009 10:12 pm UTC

a question for every non-brit... Is cider just fizzy apple juice, or is it alcoholic? Here's cider is only used for the alcoholic drink, but I'm sure I've seen Americans and Australians use it for non-alcoholic drinks?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Cassi » Mon Aug 31, 2009 10:15 pm UTC

Not fizzy, but not alcoholic. I'm not sure exactly what the difference between apple cider and apple juice is, but apple cider is darker. And that's all I've got. (Hard cider is alcoholic.)
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Mon Aug 31, 2009 10:20 pm UTC

I have never heard the word "cider" used for any alcoholic drink until I heard a British person say it.

My mom used to make fantastic cider, by the way, when we were kids. She put cinnamon sticks and stuff in it.

But yeah, cider is not carbonated, and neither is apple juice. Cider is darker, and .. has a different taste. Apple is lighter, the stuff you give to kindergarteners usually, but I still drink all the time.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Walter.Horvath » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:28 pm UTC

Dingbats wrote:I'm reviving this thread to ask about a thing I've been wondering about.

In the US, where you don't use the metric system, is the inch the smallest length unit you use? How do you refer to lengths on the order of a millimeter? Like the size of a grain of sand or a tick?

In a wider sense regarding metrication, we use it everyday as the only accepted unit in every science class. Everybody knows it, and most younger children refer to it for really small things, usually smaller than a millimeter.

I try only to use metric, and am thinking about urging of letters being sent to senators/congressmen/Mr. Obama.

A question: What are some of the state 'rivalries' in other regions of the world? Kind of like how Americans have irrational beliefs of Frenchpeoples. I remember hearing someone bashing the Swiss or Swedes, or something like that, from a neighboring country.


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