Living Cheaply

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
Cathy
Posts: 850
Joined: Sun Dec 27, 2009 5:31 am UTC
Location: TX, USA

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Cathy » Wed Aug 31, 2011 3:17 am UTC

Cytoplasm wrote:Also, goodwills are great for almost everything. There was a bag deal yesterday: five dollars (plus tax) for whatever you could fit in the paper bag provided. It was a lot cheaper than the few things I got at a Target.


When my fiance and I were first moving into an apartment together, he had a broke college student slash bachelor pad. Aka no bookcases or things to store clothes in. My body also had finally settled on my weight so I needed tons of clothes. Stopping by goodwill once a week netted me an entire wardrobe of various nice and well-made items (~$50), a bed frame($10), 3 bookcases($15), 2 bedside dressers(~$20), a large dresser with a mirror that came along with it($20), two side tables for our couch(~$20), and 4 chairs ($20) for a table we got from a friend. All this for somewhere between $150-175. Of course, YMMV, our goodwill has a large donation area. Anyway, apartments can be wildly expensive depending on where you are.

But the moral of this story is that you don't have to go to Pottery Barn and spend hundreds upon hundreds of dollars to get nice things. Getting gently used stuff here and there, craigslist, yard sales, goodwill, is wonderfully cheap and it's all a little loved so it doesn't make you so sad if your cats decide it's a scratching post or something.
Amie wrote:Cathy, I now declare you to be an awesome person, by the powers vested in me by nobody, really.
yurell wrote:We need fewer homoeopaths, that way they'll be more potent!

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby PictureSarah » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:45 am UTC

Yeah, Craigslist has been good to us. Things we have recently acquired:

Antique clawfoot bathtub: $160
Very large solid wood dresser in great condition: $40
Solid oak mission-style bed frame in very good condition with boxspring, mattress, and even a set of sheets: $250

Also, at yardsales:
A set of 12 clear glass plates
a huge glass vintage punchbowl with cute little cups (which I will ignore, but use the bowl for salad)
A fireplace screen and nifty antique washbasin stand with a little mirror (which I will use for a plantstand)
A set of nice beer glasses (25 cents each!)
A set of antique copper jello mold things (for decoration, not actual jello)
A tiffany-style table lamp

...you get the idea. None of the yardsale scores cost more than $10. Earlier in the year I bought: Two antique Wagnerware cast aluminum pots, two antique iron trivets (dated, from the 40s!), a set of vintage Pyrex baking dishes, and a vintage Pyrex screenprinted juice carafe - all for $40. Later that day, Ebay revealed that just one of the Wagnerware pots alone consistently had a "Buy It Now" price of $80-100. I was pretty pleased with myself.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
KestrelLowing
Posts: 1124
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 6:57 pm UTC
Location: Michigan

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby KestrelLowing » Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:33 pm UTC

One of the biggest things for food: Learn to cook! (If you don't already)

While some kitchen impliments can be expensive, you can find most of a servicable quality at goodwill or something similar. But, if you cook from scratch, 9 times out of 10 it will be cheaper than pre-made meals or eating out. Also, if possible, save up for a deep freezer and/or learn how to can. This will allow you to make things like spagetti sauce when things are ripe and cheap and then store them for a long time. We used to make our own applesauce from the crappy apples at the farmer's market until we were financially stable enough and my mom said "nuts on this!" Often, you can find quite a few mason jars at garage sales (epecially in more rural areas) for cheap, although many people look for them for decoration, etc. so you may have to be relatively fast.

Casseroles are popular in big families for a reason - it stretches the meat, they're pretty easy, they're cheap and filling, and often they freeze well. Try to find some good cheap recipies that make a lot of good food and eat leftovers.

User avatar
Readout
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2008 6:01 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Readout » Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:43 pm UTC

Check places you wouldn't expect for clothes. Seriously. I got a 1940s greatcoat in perfect condition for £20 (bartered down from £30 - that's another tip). I also found a £30 coat in some second-hand-clothes store that I googled later (the approved by The Queen Mother label intrigued me) that would normally be priced at £500.

Lots of tips also team up with stores to sell stuff that gets salvaged - picked up a pair of £350 speakers for £10 (spares and repairs, of course) and got a new car radio (standard Clio radio to replace a broken one) for £1.

Just make sure to wash the clothes before you wear them.

Also, as a student, I cook for myself with deals from Tesco and eat for about £2 a day whilst most people I know eat at the hall for about £9 a day. My food's nicer, too.
Anyone who can identify the language these people are really speaking wins three internet cookies

User avatar
broken_escalator
They're called stairs
Posts: 3312
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:49 am UTC
Location: _| ̄|○

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby broken_escalator » Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:54 pm UTC

podbaydoor wrote:Is that even legal? Would you run into trouble with city parks or health departments?

I didn't see anyone answer your question but this would be Poaching. I've heard stories about people coming in to the D.C. area and poaching geese, not knowing it's illegal here. Usually it acompanies stories of young families looking on in shock as the crazy foreign person runs up and kills the animal. Personally I'd love to see it, geese can be very mean around here. :evil:

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26529
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Sep 02, 2011 7:57 pm UTC

Things that are going to depend way too much on local statutes - That.

Though odds are it is poaching of some sort. I can't think of any place offhand that has a completely free for all open season on geese.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
acablue
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:16 am UTC
Location: Florida

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby acablue » Sat Sep 03, 2011 12:17 am UTC

KestrelLowing wrote:One of the biggest things for food: Learn to cook! (If you don't already)

While some kitchen impliments can be expensive, you can find most of a servicable quality at goodwill or something similar. But, if you cook from scratch, 9 times out of 10 it will be cheaper than pre-made meals or eating out. Also, if possible, save up for a deep freezer and/or learn how to can. This will allow you to make things like spagetti sauce when things are ripe and cheap and then store them for a long time. We used to make our own applesauce from the crappy apples at the farmer's market until we were financially stable enough and my mom said "nuts on this!" Often, you can find quite a few mason jars at garage sales (epecially in more rural areas) for cheap, although many people look for them for decoration, etc. so you may have to be relatively fast.

Casseroles are popular in big families for a reason - it stretches the meat, they're pretty easy, they're cheap and filling, and often they freeze well. Try to find some good cheap recipies that make a lot of good food and eat leftovers.

Addendum: not only is cooking from scratch cheaper, but if you grow your own vegetables, it can really cut down on costs. Plus, there's the benefit of eating organic, if you're into that. Usually, if you play nice with your landlord, he'll let you set aside a little plot of land near the apartment to start your own garden.

User avatar
apricity
almost grown-up but not quite
Posts: 3983
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:28 am UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby apricity » Sat Sep 03, 2011 1:35 am UTC

yawningdog wrote:And as long as everyone seems cool with food stamps, let's not leave out panhandling.
Not that those two things have anything to do with each other...
LE4d wrote:have you considered becoming an electron

it takes just a little practice to learn to be
(she/her/hers)

User avatar
aldonius
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2010 2:33 am UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby aldonius » Sat Sep 03, 2011 7:02 am UTC

Even if you're in an apartment, it should have some sort of balcony, which in turn means you can at least grow herbs and such. Depending on climate (and space), you may also be able to grow tomatoes, lettuce, various brassicas, potatoes...

I'm really serious on this, everyone should grow some of their own food.

User avatar
semicharmed
Posts: 911
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:04 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby semicharmed » Sat Sep 03, 2011 8:27 am UTC

aldonius wrote:Even if you're in an apartment, it should have some sort of balcony, which in turn means you can at least grow herbs and such. Depending on climate (and space), you may also be able to grow tomatoes, lettuce, various brassicas, potatoes...

I'm really serious on this, everyone should grow some of their own food.


Where are you living that most apartments have balconies? Maybe a sunny windowsill, if you're lucky. But there are plenty of apartments that don't have balconies, roof access or windows with decent exposure for growing things. Also, if you're in an apartment, you'll probably have to buy pots and soil; since you may not live close enough to a park with soil good for planting.

User avatar
aldonius
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2010 2:33 am UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby aldonius » Sat Sep 03, 2011 8:44 am UTC

You're correct, bad assumption on my part about existence of balcony. Pots etc are assumed, it's not like the balcony would be covered in soil, even when it does exist.
Could also be a cultural thing, I'm inclined to call everything between a detached house and a hotel an apartment.

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby PictureSarah » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:23 am UTC

I have lived in 4 different apartments, and not a single one of them had a balcony. One had a roof that I could access, and I had some pots with herbs up there, until the landlord (presumably) took them away. One had a driveway-ish space that I might have been able to put some planters in. The other two didn't have any space for plants at all, except for windows where I could hang a pot or two, and one of those was a basement apartment without much light to speak of.
Not everyone CAN grow some of their own food.

Now, however, I have a front and back yard, and, with no effort beyond watering, a fig tree, cherry tree, and plum tree :D. Next year there will be more food-producing items as well.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
Cathy
Posts: 850
Joined: Sun Dec 27, 2009 5:31 am UTC
Location: TX, USA

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Cathy » Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:44 am UTC

In my apartment complex, the upstairs apartments have balconies proper and some people do grow plants up there, but I'm on the bottom floor and my "balcony" area is enclosed by a low wrought-iron fence. The last time I put a plant up there some jerk took it. So.. not so much. That must be the only thing that makes me want an upstairs apartment -- people can't just walk up and take your stuff. Someone even broke into our outside closet (right inside that fenced area, with a lock on it) and took my guy's bike...

On that note, just because an apartment is cheap doesn't mean you should keep renting it. We've been here two years, in the last 6 months we've had roving bunches of teens going around and spraypainting/stealing stuff...
Amie wrote:Cathy, I now declare you to be an awesome person, by the powers vested in me by nobody, really.
yurell wrote:We need fewer homoeopaths, that way they'll be more potent!

User avatar
Kang
Posts: 722
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:30 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Kang » Mon Sep 05, 2011 6:58 pm UTC

Cathy wrote:On that note, just because an apartment is cheap doesn't mean you should keep renting it. We've been here two years, in the last 6 months we've had roving bunches of teens going around and spraypainting/stealing stuff...

Just to show how much I like stereotypes: your location says Texas. Don't you people have shotguns for that sort of thing? I'm sure that would be legal as long as you yell: «Get off my property, you punks! Yeehaw!»

User avatar
podbaydoor
Posts: 7548
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 4:16 am UTC
Location: spaceship somewhere out there

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby podbaydoor » Mon Sep 05, 2011 7:02 pm UTC

Texas: Where You're Rural Even If You're Urban.
tenet |ˈtenit|
noun
a principle or belief, esp. one of the main principles of a religion or philosophy : the tenets of classical liberalism.
tenant |ˈtenənt|
noun
a person who occupies land or property rented from a landlord.

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby PictureSarah » Mon Sep 05, 2011 7:39 pm UTC

Speaking of being rural in the midst of urbanity and producing one's own food, Sacramento just legalized chickens! We are thinking of converting the back of our garage into a small chicken coop (with a door to the back yard), and keeping two laying hens. The initial investment will be a bit spendy, but after that we would have a very cheap source of cruelty-free eggs, with the fringe benefits of having an easy way to dispose of table scraps, and a bit of insect control in our yard.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
farnsworth
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:11 pm UTC
Location: I don't know. Texas?

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby farnsworth » Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:38 pm UTC

Kang wrote:
Cathy wrote:On that note, just because an apartment is cheap doesn't mean you should keep renting it. We've been here two years, in the last 6 months we've had roving bunches of teens going around and spraypainting/stealing stuff...

Just to show how much I like stereotypes: your location says Texas. Don't you people have shotguns for that sort of thing? I'm sure that would be legal as long as you yell: «Get off my property, you punks! Yeehaw!»

Like the rest of the US, guns can only be used for hunting and self-defense. However, after Hurricane Ike hit Galveston, it was temporarily legal to shoot trespassers there under the "you loot, I shoot" law. Even then, a clearly-visible "No Trespassing" sign had to be posted.

Gun ownership varies with location. It would be odd (and a bit unsettling) for a neighbor in the northern suburbs of Dallas to have a shotgun, but, in rural Van Zandt near Lake Tawakoni, I wouldn't be surprised at all.

User avatar
Kang
Posts: 722
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:30 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Kang » Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:59 pm UTC

Yes, that was more of a joke. The sad part is that there are a lot of people who not only think that was normal in Texas but are pretty much convinced that every single person in the US was like that.

User avatar
semicharmed
Posts: 911
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:04 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby semicharmed » Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:09 am UTC

PictureSarah wrote:Speaking of being rural in the midst of urbanity and producing one's own food, Sacramento just legalized chickens! We are thinking of converting the back of our garage into a small chicken coop (with a door to the back yard), and keeping two laying hens. The initial investment will be a bit spendy, but after that we would have a very cheap source of cruelty-free eggs, with the fringe benefits of having an easy way to dispose of table scraps, and a bit of insect control in our yard.


If you can, do it! Almost all of my neighbours have chickens - and my landlord has told me I could have chickens if I wanted to, but knowing my time here has an end date, I didn't buy chickens for the same reason I didn't adopt a cat or a dog - and so I try to buy eggs from them when they have them.

They're about 2x as expensive as store-bought eggs, ~$0.10 in summer and as much as $0.25 in winter, but they taste soooo much better. And in a group of 10 eggs, I can have 10 different coloured yolks.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6290
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Jorpho » Tue Sep 06, 2011 12:33 pm UTC

PictureSarah wrote:Speaking of being rural in the midst of urbanity and producing one's own food, Sacramento just legalized chickens! We are thinking of converting the back of our garage into a small chicken coop (with a door to the back yard), and keeping two laying hens. The initial investment will be a bit spendy, but after that we would have a very cheap source of cruelty-free eggs, with the fringe benefits of having an easy way to dispose of table scraps, and a bit of insect control in our yard.
There are some who would furiously insist that keeping chickens in your garage and feeding them table scraps is a horribly cruel way to treat chickens and that you will surely go to Chicken Hell for doing so.

I mean, I guess there are good reasons to do it, but being cruelty-free doesn't sound like a very good one.

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby PictureSarah » Tue Sep 06, 2011 1:58 pm UTC

I would be keeping chickens in my yard, they would just sleep in the garage, so that they would be safe from raccoons, skunks, or if somehow a stray dog manages to get into the yard. And I would also feed them chicken food, just supplement with table scraps. Having owned chickens in the past, I can tell you that they LOVE table scraps - they all come running when you come out with the collander. I am not worried about people who think keeping chickens in the way I describe is cruel. They will have a few hundred square feet of yard to rove around in (for just two chickens), a warm, safe place to sleep at night, private nest boxes, clean water, occasional treats, and affection. I don't treat chickens much differently than I would treat a dog or cat, so I'm not too concerned.

Eggs that claim to be from "cage-free" chickens at the store, however, are often from chickens that have been de-beaked, because although they may not be in individual cages, they are in such tight living quarters that they would otherwise kill each other. I have been spending extra money to buy the eggs from the producer that has a certification from the Humane Society, but I'd prefer just to have a couple chickens.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26529
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Sep 06, 2011 2:51 pm UTC

semicharmed wrote:If you can, do it! Almost all of my neighbours have chickens - and my landlord has told me I could have chickens if I wanted to, but knowing my time here has an end date, I didn't buy chickens for the same reason I didn't adopt a cat or a dog - and so I try to buy eggs from them when they have them.

They're about 2x as expensive as store-bought eggs, ~$0.10 in summer and as much as $0.25 in winter, but they taste soooo much better. And in a group of 10 eggs, I can have 10 different coloured yolks.

I'm not saying this as a way of saying to not buy local made eggs or to somehow suggest that the organic egg is a waste of money and so on, as I'm sure it does taste better to you as you know where it came from and that it wasn't from an egg factory, as getting eggs from someone who has a couple dozen chickens and takes good care of them is way.. way better than store brand eggs that come from a industrial farm with horrible conditions... but....

If you can't afford the fancy eggs, you aren't missing out on that egg taste, as it's all just about the same thing. Chickens are pretty neat in that they can take just about anything and make eggs that taste exactly the same.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
semicharmed
Posts: 911
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:04 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby semicharmed » Tue Sep 06, 2011 3:31 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:I'm not saying this as a way of saying to not buy local made eggs or to somehow suggest that the organic egg is a waste of money and so on, as I'm sure it does taste better to you as you know where it came from and that it wasn't from an egg factory, as getting eggs from someone who has a couple dozen chickens and takes good care of them is way.. way better than store brand eggs that come from a industrial farm with horrible conditions... but....

If you can't afford the fancy eggs, you aren't missing out on that egg taste, as it's all just about the same thing. Chickens are pretty neat in that they can take just about anything and make eggs that taste exactly the same.


Ha. I've never done a blind taste test with the store eggs and my eggs from my neighbour's chickens - hard to do when you live alone - and it could very well be in my head. But the eggs are a pretty insignificant portion of my food budget, even in the winter at $0.25/egg. And I'd much rather give that money to my neighbours than to agribusiness here*.

Same reason I buy fresh milk instead of the pasturized kind. The fresh milk (also sour cream, kefir, and cheese) definitely tastes better.

*Here = Ukraine, where I'm a PCV. For the record, I get a stipend of about $170/month + $50 in rent + ~$60 in travel. And I generally spend < $25/week on food, including lunches in the school cafeteria most days.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26529
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Sep 06, 2011 3:47 pm UTC

Raw milk? Yeah, that's going to have a.. completely different flavor.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
farnsworth
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:11 pm UTC
Location: I don't know. Texas?

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby farnsworth » Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:24 pm UTC

Quick question: what do you do with the film that forms when you boil unpasteurized milk? While I know it can be made into kaymak, do you normally throw it away, or just eat the film?

mercutio_stencil
Posts: 293
Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:36 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby mercutio_stencil » Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:37 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
semicharmed wrote:If you can, do it! Almost all of my neighbours have chickens - and my landlord has told me I could have chickens if I wanted to, but knowing my time here has an end date, I didn't buy chickens for the same reason I didn't adopt a cat or a dog - and so I try to buy eggs from them when they have them.

They're about 2x as expensive as store-bought eggs, ~$0.10 in summer and as much as $0.25 in winter, but they taste soooo much better. And in a group of 10 eggs, I can have 10 different coloured yolks.

I'm not saying this as a way of saying to not buy local made eggs or to somehow suggest that the organic egg is a waste of money and so on, as I'm sure it does taste better to you as you know where it came from and that it wasn't from an egg factory, as getting eggs from someone who has a couple dozen chickens and takes good care of them is way.. way better than store brand eggs that come from a industrial farm with horrible conditions... but....

If you can't afford the fancy eggs, you aren't missing out on that egg taste, as it's all just about the same thing. Chickens are pretty neat in that they can take just about anything and make eggs that taste exactly the same.


Do note at the end of the article (tasting notes?) the author says age makes a big difference in quality. An egg still warm from the chicken tastes pretty fantastic, and is quite noticeably different.

Chickens are pretty awesome; I'm looking to get a few come spring. Only question is why stop at two? The difference in upkeep between two chickens and six is minimal, they seem to like having a little herd, and friends and neighbors love getting your extra eggs.

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby PictureSarah » Wed Sep 07, 2011 12:31 am UTC

Our backyard is not absolutely miniscule, but it's not large either. I don't want too many chickens, or they will completely destroy any landscaping that we do. Also, there are only two of us (my husband and me), and we don't eat eggs every day...so two eggs per day should be more than enough.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6290
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Jorpho » Wed Sep 07, 2011 2:52 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:If you can't afford the fancy eggs, you aren't missing out on that egg taste, as it's all just about the same thing. Chickens are pretty neat in that they can take just about anything and make eggs that taste exactly the same.
I figured as much. At some point I saw a video (it might have been an excerpt from Food Inc) in which people were extolling the virtues of their fantastic free-range eggs and how the foraging behavior of the chickens and the insects in their diet made a tremendous difference in the egg flavor and all I could think of was, wha?

I'm also intrigued that the omega-3 eggs had no notable fishy flavor; I thought that generally cited as a point against them.

At any rate, this isn't exactly "living cheaply" if it costs twice as much in the end, is it?

Also, raw milk sounds like seriously scary stuff.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4756
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby poxic » Wed Sep 07, 2011 3:07 am UTC

I don't know that I've tasted the difference between homegrown eggs and store eggs. I sure as hell noticed the differences in the shells, though.

We had a couple dozen chickens when I was a teen. Rhode Island Reds, specifically. The shells were brown and tough as nails, relative to an egg in general that is. My modus operandus was to use a knife as a hatchet: hold knife a couple of inches above egg, let blade do a controlled fall, end up with shell 1/3 cut through. Insert thumbs, pull apart. Surprisingly, there were rarely any eggshell bits to be picked out. The membrane on the inside of the shell really held it all together.

Also, the yolks. They were much deeper in colour and I could easily toss one from hand to hand without its membrane breaking. I was shocked the first time I met a store-bought white-egg yolk after a few years of the homegrown stuff -- it was so pale, and mushed up so easily!

I have no idea if the home-eggs were any more nutritious or whatnot than the wimpy store stuff, but they sure looked ... something-er. Like, if store eggs were paper, the home-eggs were burlap. :wink:
The Supreme Ethical Rule: Act so as to elicit the best in others and thereby in thyself.
- Felix Adler, professor, lecturer, and reformer (13 Aug 1851-1933)

User avatar
RoberII
Posts: 196
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 9:27 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby RoberII » Wed Sep 07, 2011 3:12 am UTC

If you have a bit of startup capital, or can get a loan, buying a boat to use as a liveaboard can be pretty cheap, depending on marina rates. It might be kind of cramped, though, depending on what kind of boat you get. And in winter, it can take a bit of work, if there's actual winter near you.
IcedT wrote:Also, this raises the important question of whether or not dinosaurs were delicious.


I write poetry!

User avatar
Steax
SecondTalon's Goon Squad
Posts: 3038
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 12:18 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby Steax » Wed Sep 07, 2011 3:44 am UTC

This TED Talk talks about a project that manages to create cycles of materials that become self-sustaining. Among them is a system that involves having a garden, and using waste/unused parts of plants from that for a fish farm, and further compost is used for the garden. It sounds relatively simple, but I don't know if a fish farm is easy to manage.

Still an interesting thought though.
In Minecraft, I use the username Rirez.

User avatar
semicharmed
Posts: 911
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:04 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby semicharmed » Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:28 am UTC

farnsworth wrote:Quick question: what do you do with the film that forms when you boil unpasteurized milk? While I know it can be made into kaymak, do you normally throw it away, or just eat the film?


I don't boil my milk, generally. I can buy a single litre of milk - fresh from the cow, sometimes still warm from said cow - and that will be 3-4 mornings of coffee. And if I don't manage to drink it all, I'll just make fresh buttermilk pancakes from the kefir it turns into. If I know I'm going to be having guests, I'll buy more at a time and sometimes heat it - since the heated milk definitely does stay fresh longer. But I'll heat it to just below boiling for 20 minutes or so, so I avoid the film.

Raw, unpasturized milk goes sour completely differently than the pasturized store bought stuff. At varying times/temperatures, it turns into sour cream, kefir, or something more like cottage cheese.

mercutio_stencil
Posts: 293
Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:36 pm UTC

Re: Living Cheaply

Postby mercutio_stencil » Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:16 pm UTC

semicharmed wrote:
farnsworth wrote:Quick question: what do you do with the film that forms when you boil unpasteurized milk? While I know it can be made into kaymak, do you normally throw it away, or just eat the film?


I don't boil my milk, generally. I can buy a single litre of milk - fresh from the cow, sometimes still warm from said cow - and that will be 3-4 mornings of coffee. And if I don't manage to drink it all, I'll just make fresh buttermilk pancakes from the kefir it turns into. If I know I'm going to be having guests, I'll buy more at a time and sometimes heat it - since the heated milk definitely does stay fresh longer. But I'll heat it to just below boiling for 20 minutes or so, so I avoid the film.

Raw, unpasturized milk goes sour completely differently than the pasturized store bought stuff. At varying times/temperatures, it turns into sour cream, kefir, or something more like cottage cheese.


I suppose you could do something really kind of nifty with that supply of raw milk; imagine you had a jug full of your favorite fermented dairy product, be it kefir, yogurt or sour cream, no imagine every couple of days you just add your extra milk to it, give the jar a stir and let it sit. You could have a continually replenishing supply. A much better idea than what I usually do, which is make a giant batch of yogurt once a month or so, eat it quickly and then forget that I like yogurt for three weeks.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 25 guests