"Learning" Ubuntu

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Lime
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"Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Lime » Sun Nov 14, 2010 9:25 pm UTC

So recently I've discovered that using the Terminal is a lot of fun, and I'd like to get skilled with it. What would you guys recommend as a method to become more skilled at using commands in the Terminal? Are there decent tutorials out there? What other things can I do to get the most out of Ubuntu?

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Jplus
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Jplus » Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:20 pm UTC

To get more skilled with the terminal, it's probably nice to know that each command has a manual, and the manual will come up when you type "man name_of_command". Other things you might want to know about are shell scripts and regular expressions, but those are best learnt from internet resources (googling will do the trick). And it's probably useful to know what ASCII means, and that there are various types of shells and that the default one you're using in Ubuntu is called bash.
All these terminal-related skills are quite portable across operating systems, especially the unixy ones.

To get the most out of Ubuntu, for a start experiment with as many different programs as possible and twerk all settings to your personal taste (this actually applies to every operating system). After that it depends on what you mean by "getting the most out of Ubuntu". In the most radical case, you learn how to modify (i.e. program) Ubuntu by yourself.
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Lime
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Lime » Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:55 pm UTC

Nevermind, problem solved.

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Jplus
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Jplus » Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:58 am UTC

?
"There are only two hard problems in computer science: cache coherence, naming things, and off-by-one errors." (Phil Karlton and Leon Bambrick)

coding and xkcd combined

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Lime
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Lime » Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:08 am UTC

Oh, I was having an issue, but I figured it out. Thanks for your input, I'm doing a shell tutorial right now.

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Jplus
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Jplus » Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:12 am UTC

Good luck. :)
"There are only two hard problems in computer science: cache coherence, naming things, and off-by-one errors." (Phil Karlton and Leon Bambrick)

coding and xkcd combined

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keeperofdakeys
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby keeperofdakeys » Mon Nov 15, 2010 2:26 am UTC

Personally for me, I only started really understanding more about linux when I switched to a distro that required more tinkering, but it is very much jumping in the deep-end. So I would suggest you stick with ubuntu, just trying things out in the shell and consider changing to another distro somewhere down the line.

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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Meteorswarm » Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:16 am UTC

keeperofdakeys wrote:Personally for me, I only started really understanding more about linux when I switched to a distro that required more tinkering, but it is very much jumping in the deep-end. So I would suggest you stick with ubuntu, just trying things out in the shell and consider changing to another distro somewhere down the line.


I've gotten to be plenty fluent at Linux shell manipulation just using Ubuntu; there's no reason to intentionally hurt yourself with annoying manual configuration unless you think those other distros will give you something other than being hard to configure and inconvenient.
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keeperofdakeys
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby keeperofdakeys » Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:32 am UTC

Meteorswarm wrote:I've gotten to be plenty fluent at Linux shell manipulation just using Ubuntu; there's no reason to intentionally hurt yourself with annoying manual configuration unless you think those other distros will give you something other than being hard to configure and inconvenient.

It's not that you can't, it's that your not motivated as much; this is just what I found personally. When I tried out ubuntu, I didn't really know how to jump under the covers, not that I didn't learn anything about the shell (in fact those skills were essential when I switched distro). The advantage of switching to a more configurable distro is you learn about linux itself, and you can then apply this knowledge to ubuntu as well. If I were to use ubuntu now, I would be able to use it much more effectively. If I had stayed with Ubuntu, then I would probably be lost on any other distro.

And a random The Matrix quote: You take the blue pill, the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take The Misogyny Kool-Aid, you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.

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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Meteorswarm » Mon Nov 15, 2010 5:49 am UTC

keeperofdakeys wrote:
Meteorswarm wrote:I've gotten to be plenty fluent at Linux shell manipulation just using Ubuntu; there's no reason to intentionally hurt yourself with annoying manual configuration unless you think those other distros will give you something other than being hard to configure and inconvenient.

It's not that you can't, it's that your not motivated as much; this is just what I found personally. When I tried out ubuntu, I didn't really know how to jump under the covers, not that I didn't learn anything about the shell (in fact those skills were essential when I switched distro). The advantage of switching to a more configurable distro is you learn about linux itself, and you can then apply this knowledge to ubuntu as well. If I were to use ubuntu now, I would be able to use it much more effectively. If I had stayed with Ubuntu, then I would probably be lost on any other distro.

And a random The Matrix quote: You take the blue pill, the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take The Misogyny Kool-Aid, you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.


If you're motivated to investigate the details, they're just as configurable on Ubuntu as they are anywhere else, and particularly for a novice, it's nice to only break what you're trying to break, and not have to learn everything all at once.
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Jplus
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby Jplus » Mon Nov 15, 2010 9:16 am UTC

I agree with Meteorswarm. I'm playing with operating systems a lot (I've got nine OSs and about half of them were hard to install), but usually I find Linux distros other than Ubuntu just annoying. I only want to tinker with the part that I was planning to tinker with, not get forced to tinker with two other things as well.
"There are only two hard problems in computer science: cache coherence, naming things, and off-by-one errors." (Phil Karlton and Leon Bambrick)

coding and xkcd combined

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archeleus
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Re: "Learning" Ubuntu

Postby archeleus » Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:19 pm UTC

Linux distros other than Ubuntu just annoying


I feel the same way but with Debian.

I have tried Debian, (K)Ubuntu , Slackware, Puppy, Gentoo and Red Hat Enterprise. For learning to mess with the system, Slackware is the best. It is a lot frustrating even to get it installed. Compiling software is a pain, especially to people who are used to the Debian package management system apt.

Google is your friend.

EDIT:

Anyway since this went offtopic kind of, here are two simple bash tricks

Code: Select all

cd -


Takes you to the previous directory where you were in.

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screen


Does cool stuff with your terminal. Try

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screen #create a screen
screen -ls #lists screens
screen -r #resumes a detached screen


CTRL+A then pressing D will detach a screen btw. Very useful for stuff like compiling software without interruptions.
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