D&D: Monty Hall memories

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Ixtellor
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D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Ixtellor » Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:33 pm UTC

Share your tales of your greatest monty hall moments.

1) I remember my group let in a new player once who was into making his own spells.
He had a chain lightning spell that did 10D100 electrical damage to every enemy in a 100' radius. Even at the time, in a serious monty hall group, we thought this was excessively moronic.

2) After going through the revised "Castle greyhawk" module. I had a level 18 cavalier with several million gold. So I put togeather an elite group of 1000 followers who all wore "Solid Gold - +1 Full platemail" and were all level 7 fighters.


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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:46 pm UTC

The best one my group pulled off wasn't quite intentional, they just thought of something that I should have realized.

So, they're an evil group of meglomaniacs attempting to lay siege to a Dwarven stronghold. They didn't have an army, just them and a couple of trolls they'd convinced to follow along. And a white dragon. .. yeah, it was that kind of game, but the important thing is we were having fun, damnit.

So, anyway, they meander up to the Dwarven stronghold's entrance to the surface only to find that the doors were shut. I went in to great detail describing the doors, their size, shape, and that they'd been pulled closed from the inside, leaving gouges in the dirt showing their passage. I also mentioned how the doors were solid Mithril and basically impenetrable. They appeared to be several feet thick, airtight where they met, and dozens of feet tall and across. There was no way they could tear through it as they were likely enchanted against spells and couldn't physically be forced.

Do you see where I made my error?

So.. as I'd mentioned how the doors had been pulled closed. That they opened outward. Meaning the hinges were on the outside.

So they just stole the doors and left. And sold them.

And bought an army.
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Phen » Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:54 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:The best one my group pulled off wasn't quite intentional, they just thought of something that I should have realized.

So, they're an evil group of meglomaniacs attempting to lay siege to a Dwarven stronghold. They didn't have an army, just them and a couple of trolls they'd convinced to follow along. And a white dragon. .. yeah, it was that kind of game, but the important thing is we were having fun, damnit.

So, anyway, they meander up to the Dwarven stronghold's entrance to the surface only to find that the doors were shut. I went in to great detail describing the doors, their size, shape, and that they'd been pulled closed from the inside, leaving gouges in the dirt showing their passage. I also mentioned how the doors were solid Mithril and basically impenetrable. They appeared to be several feet thick, airtight where they met, and dozens of feet tall and across. There was no way they could tear through it as they were likely enchanted against spells and couldn't physically be forced.

Do you see where I made my error?

So.. as I'd mentioned how the doors had been pulled closed. That they opened outward. Meaning the hinges were on the outside.

So they just stole the doors and left. And sold them.

And bought an army.

Having only played one "session" of D&D (We started a few weeks ago and it's still going on.), we had to get through a much less epic, but still inpenetrable wall. And when we pointed out something likewise with the hinges, the DM just changed how they worked - with magic! (but not really). :)
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Dec 01, 2008 10:06 pm UTC

See, at that point in the game I'd long since given up trying to entice them with plot hooks and the like. Instead, since they were happy playing a homicidal group of social outcasts, a band of brigands on steroids if you will, I simply let them run wild doing whatever, and rather than giving them something to react to (ie standard plot hooks) started to react to what they were doing.

In other words, they were the ones driving. It was a lot more fun that way.

And, if I fucked anything up and they got an advantage (like the hinges).. I just rolled with it. I'd fucked up. I mean, I didn't let them have a do-over when a half-hour after combat ended they realized they actually had +2 more than they thought on their attack and should have hit more often, meaning the mage shouldn't have been nearly killed... why should I be any different?
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Ixtellor » Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:05 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:In other words, they were the ones driving. It was a lot more fun that way.


Towards the end of my D&D days (around 1995) this was how most sessions went. In our group, we were exclusively playing in the forgotten realms setting (a more conservative version - no level 12 wizards' working as barkeeps) and after the players would hit around level 7, they always had political and conquest ambitions, and the DM was just serve to facilitate what the players were trying to accomplish.

It also allowed the DM to easily insert any premade adventures if they were applicable.

Player "I am going to travel to location X and scout around to see if it is a good place for a stronghold"
DM 'pulls out his premade troll camp being ruled by a half-demon level 13 wizard'
The camp has some high ranking captives from silverymoon. The players will decide if they should turn that into the next adventure or not.


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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Endless Mike » Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:49 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:The best one my group pulled off wasn't quite intentional, they just thought of something that I should have realized.

So, they're an evil group of meglomaniacs attempting to lay siege to a Dwarven stronghold. They didn't have an army, just them and a couple of trolls they'd convinced to follow along. And a white dragon. .. yeah, it was that kind of game, but the important thing is we were having fun, damnit.

So, anyway, they meander up to the Dwarven stronghold's entrance to the surface only to find that the doors were shut. I went in to great detail describing the doors, their size, shape, and that they'd been pulled closed from the inside, leaving gouges in the dirt showing their passage. I also mentioned how the doors were solid Mithril and basically impenetrable. They appeared to be several feet thick, airtight where they met, and dozens of feet tall and across. There was no way they could tear through it as they were likely enchanted against spells and couldn't physically be forced.

Do you see where I made my error?

So.. as I'd mentioned how the doors had been pulled closed. That they opened outward. Meaning the hinges were on the outside.

So they just stole the doors and left. And sold them.

And bought an army.

I would have suggested waiting until they ran out of air in the stronghold since the doors were airtight. Although I guess that would take a loooooooong time.

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:09 pm UTC

They're dwarves. They have air vents and bellows and the like pumping in air from elsewhere. The airtight doors are simply to stop gas attacks.
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heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Endless Mike » Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:23 pm UTC

Like I know anything about dwarves. Or have ever played a tabletop RPG. (Which I'm not saying is a bad thing, in any way. I'm not trying to troll.)

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:27 pm UTC

Well.. it's pretty much a given that any group of people with a long-term settlement deep underground has a system of getting air from the surface to the living areas and the "bad air" back out. An entrance large enough for caravans to enter, while providing a lot of inflow of air, would still not provide enough to keep those deep within from suffocating.

I mean, it's basically the principles of shaft mining ramped up a couple notches.
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Maseiken » Thu Dec 04, 2008 1:35 am UTC

So they should've found the Highest Air shaft, sealed the doors, and filled the stronghold with water...
"GRRRRRRRRRROOOOOOOOWR!!!!"
(Translation: "Objection!")

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Mr. Beck » Thu Dec 04, 2008 2:05 am UTC

Or pulled a Cryptonomicon:
Fill the place full of flammable oil, then drop in a match...

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Yuri2356 » Thu Dec 04, 2008 4:56 pm UTC

Or just set up shop and wait for the fort to emo itself to death...

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Dec 04, 2008 5:16 pm UTC

D&D =/= Dwarf Fortress.
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heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Ixtellor » Thu Dec 04, 2008 5:27 pm UTC

Um back to the thread topic.

I WANT TO HEAR ABOUT YOUR CRAZY MONTY HALL, CHARACTERS, EQ, SPELLS, ADVENTURES, ETC!!!

Here is something to help you get started:

What is the most powerful weapon that anyone had, or gave out as a DM, during your time playing D&D.


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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Yuri2356 » Thu Dec 04, 2008 6:14 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:D&D =/= Dwarf Fortress.

Homebrew. It works, bitches.

I WANT TO HEAR ABOUT YOUR CRAZY MONTY HALL, CHARACTERS, EQ, SPELLS, ADVENTURES, ETC!!!

An amorphous blob composed of the very fabric of spacetime make a desperate attempt to contain a stray pocket of absolute chaos which budded off of the present god of madness while it tossed about in its eternal slumber. This writhing mass of mindless entropy took upon some twisted semblance of a living mind, made friends with a kitty, and then just sort of wandered off.

A first level sorcerer with one Divine Rank, gaining one more with each level. In a party with three other young gods. Good times followed. (Details at a later time)

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Chen » Thu Dec 04, 2008 8:51 pm UTC

Our party on one campaign was fairly high powere (around 16th level) and fairly optimally built. We'd tear apart most challenges set before us. So our DM threw us into this one situation where the party got split up and it ended up being me (druid) and the monk underwater surrounded by megalodons and this one big shark our DM created. He thought he had us good there. Until I polymorphed the monk into a giant squid, wildshaped into one myself and then animal growthed us both. Do you have any idea how unbalanced a giant squid with like 12 attacks and a 30 str is? Fairly unbalanced. Now 2 giant squids, one with 16 monk levels and the other with 16 druid levels....lets just say it wasn't even close to a fair fight.

So keep that in mind DMs. Never throw a 3.5ed druid into the water vs anything cause wildshaping into a giant squid is not fair.

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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Ixtellor » Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:34 pm UTC

Chen wrote:Our party on one campaign was fairly high powere (around 16th level) and fairly optimally built. We'd tear apart most challenges set before us.


This seems to be a common problem in many campaigns.

When I used to DM, one thing I would do is make the characters stop encountering monsters as frequently, and start encountering other high level adventures.
Fighting demons and other super high level monsters starts to become a stretch after awhile IMHO. (In terms of rarity, balance, and plausiblity)

Instead of finding a demon prince at the end of the adventure, they would find a group of high level evil characters ((or good, if the party was evil)). (Drow work great for this as well, as they have great magic items (that can be destroyed in the sun, for game balance purposes) and drow can come in basically any class or level)

Another thing I did that ended up killing an entire high level party is I finally forced myself to come up with, what I considered to be, a legitimate huge ancient dragon adventure.

I am thinking 'This guy is over 1000 years old, and has a super-genius intelligence'. This is not the kind of creature that is just going to charge you and do is dumb 'breath weapon, followed by claw/claw/tail/bite attack combo'.

I think it was a huge ancient shadow dragon with access to level 6 wizard spells.
In addition, I have read, and believe that someone that old who can cast spells would create their own spells and have their lair ready to go.

At the time I was also using critical hit tables based on body part. Since dragons have amazing THAC0S, My super genius dragon, after brutally slaying several characters though devious traps, breath weapon, and spells, was making all called shot attacks on the vital areas, including the head.
The dragon, who had ample warning the players were coming, as they made their way through his lair, had cast a multitude of highly defensive spells, that the players never managed to take down, before the fight was over.

At the end of the fight, every character was dead except for a psionist who went etheral and ran, and a level 16 wizard who teleported away.

Needless to say this was a lot different that "The dragon claws you for 11 damage on his second attack" type dragon adventure.

Ixtellor

P.S. I hate to ramble and derail my thread, but I think intelligence of monsters is way underutilized the way the rule books are laid out/explained. Would a supra-genius really just fight toe-to-toe with adventurers and use low damage attacks?

My favorite 'enemy adventures' to DM are without a doubt lichs and vampires. If you play them like ancient super intelligent beings who have access to magic items, spells, and a lifetime of preparing and defending their lairs, they should be extremely challenging. The ability to create high level spells is VERY powerful and not to be overlooked. Factor in permancy spells and lichs are a force.
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby Chrismclegless » Fri Dec 05, 2008 1:25 am UTC

Wasn't D&D, but I once had a staff that could store up to 100 magic points worth of spells. This wasn't a problem until I started having long periods of downtime, during which I would store one fireball spell each day, using all of my power in each one. When we finally came to a battle I unleashed a weeks worth of pent up magic in the first few rounds. I managed to take down one of the greater demons single handed, while the rest of the party struggled through the other one.

I eventually got rid of the item because it was too powerful, but that's a whole other story.
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Re: D&D: Monty Hall memories

Postby PhatPhungus » Fri Dec 05, 2008 5:48 am UTC

I was in a 3.5 D&D campaign with a few homebrew rules that resulted in a Dwarf Barbarian with 18 str and 20 con that could dual wield with no penalties, but had 3 intelligence. We downplayed the fact that by the rules I shouldn't have been able to talk properly, basically I just acted completely on impulse (which as often as not set the party backwards (but was always hilarious)).

On one occasion, the party was in a dungeon where monsters were spawning, and we came across a riddle. Now, while the rest of the characters were trying to figure out the solution to the riddle, I got impatient and said we should go fight more monsters. (which were popping into existence every so often). For some reason, the party decided to go with it, and we ended up losing a lot of HP, so as per my suggestion, we slept the night in the dungeon. With monsters spawning every few minutes. We woke up with 600 monsters at the door. We thought we were absolutely fucked, ran around a bit, and ended up in a room with some glyphs on the floor, and sat there. I got impatient, smacked one of the glyphs with my axe, and was transported halfway across the continent (eventually the rest of the party followed). Funniest part was, they were about to solve the riddle, which would have stopped the monsters from spawning, averting the entire crisis, but instead, they listened to the character with 3 intelligence.

Later in the campaign (I was going to go for frenzied berserker, but this kind of got in the way), I ran down a hall in some dungeon cause I heard clanking, and I ran into a giant robot thing that attacked with 4 greatswords every round. Long story short, I die, the party beats it. There's an orb thingy in the middle. Someone else decides to put my body on the orb, and the monster reassembles itself. I am now a giant robot that attacks 4x per round with greatswords, and when I talk, people have to make fortitude saves.
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