No Country for Old Men

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No Country for Old Men

Postby Ennui » Sun Dec 09, 2007 1:44 am UTC

(a quick search yielded no recent results pertaining to this movie, but if I missed something I apologize in advance)

I'm surprised there's no thread about this. No Country For Old Men is out in theaters in the US right now. It's the latest movie by the Coen Brothers (who also did The Big Lebowski, Fargo, Raising Arizona, and O Brother Where Art Thou, among others), based on a book of the same title by Cormac McCarthy.

Anyone seen it yet? I loved it myself. The antagonist is portrayed excellently and it has the Coen quirkiness we all know and love.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Narsil » Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:01 am UTC

This movie was amazing, but this is coming from an avid Coen brothers fan, so I'm not sure what that's worth.

Antone was an amazing villain (I wonder if it could be said that he's the main character?), and there are so many things that could be said about the coin-toss scene alone.
Spoiler:
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Colonel Beer-Uzi » Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:33 am UTC

I thought it was brilliant, there were parts where it just made my jaw drop at times and I wasn't even expecting it.

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Malice » Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:26 am UTC

Any fans of the movie should go check out the book, which is amazing in its own right. The entire book is written in a kind of minimalist deadpan, and perfectly balances action with the profound (reminds me of Hamlet). It's one amazing moment after another, and it's easy to imagine the film. I wish I had a way to see it...
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby EdgarJPublius » Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:59 pm UTC

Cormac McCarthy is basically a literary god and I think the coen brother's are exactly the right people to put his work to film.
This movie was amazing in every conceivable way.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Aleril » Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:33 pm UTC

I heard that it keeps your attention, but also that the ending is really disappointing.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Ennui » Mon Dec 10, 2007 1:37 am UTC

I wouldn't say that it's really disappointing, but it was sort of strange and anti-climactic.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Malice » Mon Dec 10, 2007 2:38 am UTC

Ennui wrote:I wouldn't say that it's really disappointing, but it was sort of strange and anti-climactic.


It's the same way in the book--it does that thing where the standard thriller story stops and you go, "Wait, what?" and the book goes deeper into profound depths. Usually I love that (A Scanner Darkly, anyone?), and my only problem with the book is that that period seems to last too long... I'm sure the movie shortened it, though.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Narsil » Tue Dec 11, 2007 2:46 am UTC

Ennui wrote:I wouldn't say that it's really disappointing, but it was sort of strange and anti-climactic.

Spoiler:
I thought it was a perfect ending. Antone gets a fitting fate. His whole character revolves around staying one step ahead of everyone, and being the last man standing. But then he gets splattered by the car, and suddenly he's helpless. He's in the middle of suburbia and he has to rely on the kindness of others. Also, he's probably not gonna walk too far away from that accident. At any rate, he had been defeated.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Girl™ » Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:34 pm UTC

Thanks for the spoiler. >(
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Narsil » Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:40 pm UTC

Damn. I feel like an ass now.
Spoiler:
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby namenad » Fri Dec 14, 2007 10:03 pm UTC

Also an avid Coen devotee, and I like their crime stuff too.

thought it harkened back to fargo and blood simple, but that ending....

what can i say.

i was disappointed by the ending

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Dec 18, 2007 5:55 pm UTC

Spoiler:
Anyone else under the impression that Tommy Lee Jones character was dead, which is why his last two scenes (after busting into the hotel room where Antone was hiding, only to find it empty) are so mysterious and ephemeral? Or was that really really obvious?

I also appreciated that Antone is not so much a character as the Grim Reaper... DEATH MAN, DEATH! Or that the mexicans weren't characters, but a force to be considered.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby namenad » Tue Dec 18, 2007 6:22 pm UTC

Spoiler:
interesting...

even if you aren't "correct", i find that to be the best possible explanation for the end of the film.

but if antoine were death, why the car accident?

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:06 am UTC

Spoiler:
Another interpretation I heard was that both men were unable to fulfill their perceived 'destinies' and take one another down. Tommy Lee Jones is dead or retired, and the evil guy ends up not being a step ahead of everyone, relying on the kindness of someone else. The mexicans win.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby nevskey1 » Mon Dec 31, 2007 6:14 pm UTC

I just read the book last night and plan(ned) on seeing the movie asap. But again I'm a victim of the same story as always. I read a book in anticipation of the adaptation, and then (especially with a good book) I don't want to see the movie. And this was a VERY good book. And I love the Coen brothers and couldn't agree more that they are best suited to filmify McCarthy's work. In fact, they seem to have been really quite influenced by McCarthy throughout their career -- particularly in Raising Arazona (esp. the scene that introduces the biker), Barton Fink, and Fargo. Even Big Lebowski had a certain McCarthy-esque southwestern desolation feel to it. So, when I first saw the trailer months ago my immediate response was that they were a match made in heaven. But now... I don't know. I expect the film is great and all. No doubts about that. But I just have it in my head in my own way, and that's in a very good way, and I don't want that corrupted. (I must admit that as I read I couldn't not imagine Tommy Lee Jones as Bell.) So what do people here say, should I see it, which I probably will anyway -- who am I kidding, right?

But I also have the same problem with Atonement, for instance. And there've been others, too.

Does anyone else suffer this sort of dilemma?
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:14 am UTC

Everytime i've ever seen the movie after reading the book i've been disapointed. I've made a point of going the other way (after seeing the movie, reading the book...) whenever something nifty hits the theaters.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Dr.Robert » Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:29 am UTC

Just saw it:

Spoiler:
I liked this movie, even if I did zone out a few times during the beginning. The movie got progressively better as it went on, and I did rather enjoy the films ending. I thought it was pretty conclusive and did a good job at conveying its message. I loved how there was no music... the atmosphere, it was so dry, almost chilling. I absolutely loved the cop's last monologue. It was just... so good.

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:51 pm UTC

Spoiler:
Heeeeey Dr. Robert, can you explicitly say what you think the movies intended ending was?
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Malice » Tue Jan 08, 2008 12:43 am UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:
Spoiler:
Anyone else under the impression that Tommy Lee Jones character was dead, which is why his last two scenes (after busting into the hotel room where Antone was hiding, only to find it empty) are so mysterious and ephemeral? Or was that really really obvious?

I also appreciated that Antone is not so much a character as the Grim Reaper... DEATH MAN, DEATH! Or that the mexicans weren't characters, but a force to be considered.


Having just seen it last night... (Incredibly amazing, by the way. Definitely one of the best movies I've seen this year, and probably the best thing the Coens have ever done.)

Spoiler:
Jones' character is not dead. Consider the shot of the two doors, taped off as a crime scene. They basically represent Jones' calling his coin flip. He opens the door, inadvertently hiding Antone, looks around, doesn't see anybody, and sits down, relieved that he doesn't have to come face to face with this monstrous evil, essentially thinking, "I guess I was wrong, he didn't come back."
Then he sees the coin, which signifies, "No, he did come back. Luck or fate is all that has saved me."
Without going back to his reaction, the shot fades back to the country, and the very next scene is Jones saying, "I'm thinking of retiring."
Jones didn't die. He abdicated; he gave up. He doesn't want to face Chigurgh. He doesn't want to fight the tide of evil in the world anymore. He decides to sit at home and lament the good old days (a notion which ties into NCFOM as a neo-Western, where the old values are dying just like the practice of riding a horse around--note the dialogue in that last scene, and how the West is reduced to what he can see out his window). He laments the good old days, even though his friend (uncle?) in the wheelchair is there to tell him, This isn't anything new. People were getting shot on their porches back in 1909. It's vanity to think this is all about you. The world hasn't changed, YOU have. This country has never been one for old men.
And then the recounting of the two dreams, particularly the one with his father, carrying a light ahead, which seems to offer some possibility of hope, some reason to go on trying.
"And then I woke up."


...so ends one of the most difficult, brutal, existential, and yet beautiful and brilliant, movies I've seen in recent memory.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Mo0man » Wed Jan 23, 2008 5:06 pm UTC

Spoiler:
I thought that whole thing about the second dream and his dad going ahead was supposed to signify something about the afterlife, but he when he tried to follow he woke up, as it wasn't his time yet
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby cyberdeftly » Mon Jan 28, 2008 9:10 pm UTC

I agree that this was an excellent movie.

The scene (not a spoiler) in the hotel and he's sitting on the bed and you can see the shadow of the other guy walking and than it's quiet and than *squeak* *squeak* *squeak* and the hallway light goes out. INCREDIBLE! I was so flattened by that scene and others that were similar in style. The movie incorporated sound like pros do, the best of them.

Though I will say this. The ending made me angry. I left the theater angry and empty. I got the whole bigger picture of the film and I do cherish and admire that. BUT, my eager basic principle and outer layer feelings for the film were unsatisfied.

Spoiler:
You're rooting for that main guy (shit I can't remember his name) and you want him to win so badly and than the next thing you know he's dead outside the motel and that's it. THAT'S IT! After that moment I could barely hold on to watch the rest of it. I was so angry I wanted to leave.


Otherwise - brilliant film

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Dr.Robert » Tue Jan 29, 2008 3:38 am UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:
Spoiler:
Heeeeey Dr. Robert, can you explicitly say what you think the movies intended ending was?


Spoiler:
I thought that the ending monologue pretty much defined the central theme of the film. Bell feels helpless in a world of turmoil; a world that never stops ticking and will only continue to bring further destruction that cannot possibly be halted or remedied by his hands. In the dream, he envisions his father holding a torch, a source of warmth and hope for a better world, but then abruptly "woke up." The world he once envisioned, the world where violence could be eliminated, or a least subdued, had faded away.

The ending's lack of closure emphasizes this point quite brilliantly, for it leaves the future of the bad guy's untended to. If Anton had died by the hands of anyone, the films meaning would have diminished. Even the ironic car accident he found himself in contributed to the meaning; no matter what happens to the face of evil, it will continue on, relentless in its quest to cause chaos.

This is some of what I took away from the film.

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Zohar » Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:09 am UTC

I agree with Dr. Robert. I saw the movie and loved it. Some of my friends thought it was very good but didn't know what to think of it, what the point was. Mine is quite similar to Dr. Robert:
Spoiler:
There is no point.
However, I don't believe this should make us pessimic, even with no specific goal, no guarantee that good will triumph over evil, we should still strive to love life and enjoy life, despite its hardships. While the movie portrayed the characters' emotional state very well, upon reflecting on it, it decided to show a very grim point of view.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby pinkgothic » Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:31 am UTC

Narsil wrote:Antone was an amazing villain (I wonder if it could be said that he's the main character?), and there are so many things that could be said about the coin-toss scene alone.


Maybe you'd enjoy the movie American Perfekt, then.

No Country For Old Men yanked my thoughts to that movie. I'm not sure if it's intentional or not (and, if intentional, if it's an homage or a rip-off or something else entirely), but particularly the ending is a lot like American Perfekt. Unfortunately, this partly ruined No Country For Old Me for me, because it made it a hell lot more predictable, especially toward the end.

(Mind you, I assume the parallels - noticable as they may be - are quite accidental.)

Chronology, for what it's worth: NCFOM movie (2007) > NCFOM book (2005) > American Perfekt (1997).
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby swik » Sun Mar 09, 2008 3:19 am UTC

Spoiler:
I figured the movie was summed up when Ed Tom was in his uncle's trailer and he hears the story of his uncle's death. Ed Tom was disheartened with the times and felt that he was too old or outdated in the face of the "new evils" in the world.His uncle however relates the story of the death of his uncle, in the early 1900's. He died a violent and pointless death, such evils have always existed.

Then there's the message that in trying to get back what has been lost, you end up losing more, the problems with greed. It consistently happens throughout the film. All those in the drug deal are killed. All those that are hired to get back the money are killed, except for Anton and some of the Mexicans get away but not without losing many men. Moss greedily tries to get away with the money and is killed, in the process of trying to win it all he gets his wife killed as well. Wells gets killed as does the company man that hired him.

Even Anton is not immune, he goes back to kill Moss' wife because of the promise he made, even though she had nothing to do with anything at all. In doing so he gets horribly injured in a car accident, which in this movie, is getting off light. The only one who gets away is Ed Tom, who decides to retire rather than continue to hunt Anton.

The title is ironic as all the young men in the film are killed or in Anton's case (though he's more of a force of nature than a character) horribly hurt and never even gets the money he was after. Only the old man gets out alive. It's been a few years since I studied Sailing to Byzantium (the poem whose first line the movie and book get its title) in school, I don't really remember much about it. If I remember it also is ironic in that it states that there is no country for old men, but then when talking about the young generation it talks about death.

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby cephalopod9 » Sun Mar 09, 2008 11:40 pm UTC

I thought the film style was really interesting. They used a lot of that narrow point of veiw stuff. So bleak. The use of suspense was also fascinating
Spoiler:
It seemed like through a lot of the movie they show you exactly what is about to happen. The hotel scene where they zoom in on the doorknob, and especially at the end where Anton starts driving away. Maybe that's just my excessifly analytical perspective and dislike for prolonged suspense tho'.


What other Coen Brothers films do I need to go see?
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Malice » Mon Mar 10, 2008 2:13 am UTC

cephalopod9 wrote:What other Coen Brothers films do I need to go see?


Fargo, Blood Simple, Miller's Crossing, The Big Lebowski, O Brother Where Art Thou?...

You can skip most of the flat-out comedies. Can't tell you about the rest, though, there are some I haven't seen.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Mr. Beck » Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:38 am UTC

Simply brilliant. Not only I was on the edge at every moment, but this film also had some deeper meaning. Hmmm...would "beautifully brutal" be a good summary? There are so many scenes that stick in my mind: both Coin Flips, the middle Hotel Battle, the Highway Murder. Chigurgh is an absolutely amazing character. (Hugh...the spellcheck suggestion for "Chigurgh" in Firefox is "figurehead"...how does that work?) As the epitome of evil he succeeds incredibly. Without him, this would be nothing. The Pneumatic Bolt Gun is the most original, scariest weapon I have ever seen. Finally, the lack of a soundtrack adds so much to the film, both in terms of grittiness and suspense.
Mo0man wrote:
Spoiler:
I thought that whole thing about the second dream and his dad going ahead was supposed to signify something about the afterlife, but he when he tried to follow he woke up, as it wasn't his time yet

Spoiler:
Yeah, the second dream certainly represented Death/The Afterlife. This is doubly interesting in light of Lewellyn's comment "Then I'll tell him when I get there" in the beginning of the film.

Aleril wrote:Since I cant really say anything that hasn't already been said, I just would like to say that this is a gloriously amazing movie. I loved every second of it, whether it was insightfull dialogue or pulse-pounding action I could not leave my seat.

Two Thumbs Up! :D
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Aleril » Mon Mar 17, 2008 5:07 pm UTC

Since I cant really say anything that hasn't already been said, I just would like to say that this is a gloriously amazing movie. I loved every second of it, whether it was insightfull dialogue or pulse-pounding action I could not leave my seat.

Two Thumbs Up! :D
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Narsil » Thu Mar 20, 2008 11:09 pm UTC

pinkgothic wrote:
Narsil wrote:Antone was an amazing villain (I wonder if it could be said that he's the main character?), and there are so many things that could be said about the coin-toss scene alone.


Maybe you'd enjoy the movie American Perfekt, then.

No Country For Old Men yanked my thoughts to that movie. I'm not sure if it's intentional or not (and, if intentional, if it's an homage or a rip-off or something else entirely), but particularly the ending is a lot like American Perfekt. Unfortunately, this partly ruined No Country For Old Me for me, because it made it a hell lot more predictable, especially toward the end.

(Mind you, I assume the parallels - noticable as they may be - are quite accidental.)

Chronology, for what it's worth: NCFOM movie (2007) > NCFOM book (2005) > American Perfekt (1997).

I am intrigued. Thanks for the tip, I'm making a half-price books run soon, so I'll look for it in the bargain bin.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby pinkgothic » Fri Mar 21, 2008 6:23 am UTC

Be warned, the budget is not comparable. Also be warned, opinions of the two movies at large would suggest American Perfekt to be... less than perfect! ;) I personally don't care (well, obviously), but I think it's only fair I mention it. And, of course, chances are you already know all this already and I'm merely digging myself that deeper hole.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Felstaff » Fri Mar 21, 2008 4:56 pm UTC

No Country For Old Men, or There Will Be Blood?

I love both equally, and have forgiven Hollywood (partly) for its past misgivings for both these sublime filmositions. I also notice they're both based on novels, of which I'll devour once I get my grubby mitts on them.

Also: some critics[citation forthcoming] have said "it's a return to form for the Coen Brothers". Hells, they never lost it.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Mother Superior » Fri Mar 21, 2008 6:52 pm UTC

Not a contest for me, No Country wins. There will be blood was a good movie, no doubt, but No Country was genius.
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby nevskey1 » Sat Mar 22, 2008 4:02 am UTC

I read No Country the night before I saw it. Last time I ever watch a movie of a book I love. If the Coen brothers can disappoint me (and they're at their best here), then this is no country for book adaptations [/cheesiness]. The movie is terrific for what it is, but the book is SO great.

Haven't seen TWBB, but I expect to love it. Ever since Gangs of New York, Daniel Day Lewis has been the greatest actor ever filmed, for my money. So, what about Lewis or Chigurrh, in addition to the movies themselves? Were the Oscars right or wrong? (Maybe one of the toughest coin-tosses ever stood behind that decision.)
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Herman » Tue Mar 25, 2008 1:42 am UTC

Yeah, really awesome movie.

I'm still laughing over this line a few days after seeing it:

Spoiler:
"This is a real mess, isn't it, sheriff?"
"Well, if not, it'll do 'till the mess gets here."

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby HMC » Tue Mar 25, 2008 2:32 am UTC

Man: "That's a dead dog."
Chigurh: "Yes it is."

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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Vanguard » Tue Mar 25, 2008 3:22 pm UTC

I loved the movie but the ending was fucking stupid.
Spoiler:
Car crash. The end. What the HELL?


Overall. Loved it. Untill that.
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Mr. Beck
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby Mr. Beck » Tue Mar 25, 2008 6:11 pm UTC

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dbsmith
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Re: No Country for Old Men

Postby dbsmith » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:07 am UTC

So does anyone know where I can get the podcast where they discuss the end of the film?
It used to be here:
http://www.nocountryforoldmen.com/podcast/


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