Subtitling vs. dubbing

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How do you prefer your foreign language films?

Subtitled.
234
88%
Dubbed.
17
6%
Original language, even if I don't understand it.
4
1%
They make films in foreign languages?
2
1%
Otter translated to duck or vice-versa.
10
4%
 
Total votes: 267

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby LatwPIAT » Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:40 am UTC

I think that movie was called "Life is wonderful" in English.

Yeah, they really got the languages right in that movie; The Italians speak Italian, the Germans speak German, and the American speaks American, all with native dialects.

On a similar notice, I'd recomend Kukushka (The Cucko, or something...) where a Russian, a Finn, and a Sami live through the winter of '44. Of course, they don't understand each other, but the audience get's the whole sub. For example, the Russian ends up being called "Goaway" because he doesn't want to say what his name is. I really find it interesting to watch TV when language is used as a tool like that, rather than just instant translations.

Of course, another good one comes from Metal Gear Solid 3, where the whoe game is spoken in English, even though the characters speak English and Russian interchangeably. What makes this interesting is that at one point, one of the characters convey a message to another character, even though all three of them stood right next to each other. While you can't hear it from their English, it was apparent that the character actuallt spoke in two different languages in that sceene.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Artemis Leon » Mon Mar 24, 2008 3:43 pm UTC

I much prefer dubbing for anime--since all animated programing is essentially dubbed anyway, I'd rather be able to watch something without also reading it, even if the voices don't quite match the characters. For live-action shows, I'll take subtitles. The mismatches of voice and visual are a lot more jarring with real people.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Nomic » Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:10 pm UTC

Subtitles all the way. Dubbing always sounds worse than the original, and sometimes the translators might've made a mistake. With subtitles you can hear the original actors so you know if the translators got it wrong.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:40 pm UTC

Subbing always sounds worse? My copies of Slayers disagree.

I swear, whoever voiced Lina has the right frequency to cause me to try and claw out my ears while my eyes leak blood.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby AngrySquirrel » Mon Mar 31, 2008 9:06 pm UTC

Subtitles, dubbing makes my head explode, but not in a good way.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby DreadArchon » Tue Apr 01, 2008 1:15 am UTC

I watch everything subtitled, as understanding speech is a bit of a weak point for me. The subtitles for dubbed movies are often amazingly different than what the dubbed voice is saying, so I try to always leave movies in their original languages.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Gelsamel » Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:19 am UTC

I've mentioned it before, in the anime thread. But the dub for Samurai X: Trust/Betrayal is easily perfect. So far the only dub that I've really liked...
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Mr. Beck » Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:19 pm UTC

DreadArchon wrote:I watch everything subtitled...

I recently visited a friend whom I have not seen for a while. Apparently, he now watches everything subbed. We saw some movie, and yes, it did make comprehension mush easier. I may have to try it myself.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby william » Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:19 pm UTC

fukiyo wrote:I would be a horrible fansubber for anime because I would end up not translating half of what the characters say and just putting in a ton of translator's notes. I hate it when dubbers/subbbers try to translate "untranslatable" slang or phrases. Itadekimasu does not mean "I'm digging in!" or "Looks tasty" or anything like that, damn it! Itadekimasu means itadekimasu...you can't translate it! And to me, it just takes away from the anime/movie when they put words into a character's mouth like that.

I absolutely hate that. Itadekimasu is absolutely translatable and if I miss the tiny nuance that is almost certainly not even intended by the original author*. What I hate is when people decide that the Japanese words should be left in. No, you can most definitely define things. To me, it just takes away from the anime/movie when they don't make things into the language I actually understand. I can actually sort of understand it for dubs where they have to put it in the same number of syllables or it'll mess everything up, but with subtitles you're fucking transliterating it into another language. The only limitations you have to translation are how fast a person can read(and that works against translator's notes). You have no reason not to translate.

So in conclusion, I like subtitles, but I wish they would act more like the dubbers and fuck authenticity once in a while.

*There are two exceptions. #1 is puns. Those you can explain in translator notes, but even then only if you can't make an equivalent pun. #2 is semi-obscure Japanese cultural things. Those you can also explain in translator notes.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby cathrl » Wed Apr 02, 2008 3:21 pm UTC

william wrote:
fukiyo wrote:I would be a horrible fansubber for anime because I would end up not translating half of what the characters say and just putting in a ton of translator's notes. I hate it when dubbers/subbbers try to translate "untranslatable" slang or phrases. Itadekimasu does not mean "I'm digging in!" or "Looks tasty" or anything like that, damn it! Itadekimasu means itadekimasu...you can't translate it! And to me, it just takes away from the anime/movie when they put words into a character's mouth like that.

I absolutely hate that. Itadekimasu is absolutely translatable and if I miss the tiny nuance that is almost certainly not even intended by the original author*. What I hate is when people decide that the Japanese words should be left in. No, you can most definitely define things. To me, it just takes away from the anime/movie when they don't make things into the language I actually understand. I can actually sort of understand it for dubs where they have to put it in the same number of syllables or it'll mess everything up, but with subtitles you're fucking transliterating it into another language. The only limitations you have to translation are how fast a person can read(and that works against translator's notes). You have no reason not to translate.

So in conclusion, I like subtitles, but I wish they would act more like the dubbers and fuck authenticity once in a while.

*There are two exceptions. #1 is puns. Those you can explain in translator notes, but even then only if you can't make an equivalent pun. #2 is semi-obscure Japanese cultural things. Those you can also explain in translator notes.


I agree. Dubbing "aniki" as "big brother" just sounds silly, because, while that's what it means, it's not something you use to address someone in English. Either leave it as "aniki" or use a term we would use in English, dammit! (Glares at Gatchaman dub).

But, to fukiyo whose original post I can't seem to find: not translating half of it? Nah. That just makes it sound like elitism. Most dialogue is pretty trivial, when it comes down to it, and almost all of the time the fact that a particular word means something not quite the same as its English equivalent is completely irrelevant. I'm not impressed by translators who insist on making sure everyone knows the full depths of their knowledge of the nuances of the language by putting in little notes all over the place. People translate novels all the time without needing to do it, and produce something which is readable in itself. So there's no exact translation of some word which gets used at the start of a meal? Really, in the context of watching a film or show, who cares? Use something which fits with the mood and the plot. It's not a language lesson or a demonstration of the translator's knowledge.

The other thing that drives me completely spare is the original language purists who insist that you can't possibly get the deep, meaningful nuances of the show unless you listen to the original voice actors, whose performance is perfect and wonderful in every way. Meanwhile, the people who speak the original language natively are posting parodies of the "deep, meaningful" dialogue and laughing themselves silly at how cheesy the voice acting is. Not understanding something doesn't necessarily mean it is well done.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Zohar » Thu Apr 03, 2008 11:41 am UTC

cathrl wrote:
william wrote:So in conclusion, I like subtitles, but I wish they would act more like the dubbers and fuck authenticity once in a while.

*There are two exceptions. #1 is puns. Those you can explain in translator notes, but even then only if you can't make an equivalent pun. #2 is semi-obscure Japanese cultural things. Those you can also explain in translator notes.


I agree. Dubbing "aniki" as "big brother" just sounds silly, because, while that's what it means, it's not something you use to address someone in English. Either leave it as "aniki" or use a term we would use in English, dammit! (Glares at Gatchaman dub).


I don't agree on that. Anime is made in Japan (great, now *that* song's stuck in my head) and it has a very different culture than ours (both the US and Israel, in this case). Keeping it as "aniki" would frustrate me - "why do they bother translating at all?", changing it to something else would not be accurate. Translating it to "big brother" seems accurate. And while it's different and unusual in English, I think that's part of the point. If you wanted a show filled with cultural references from the US, watch a show made in the US. Or one "adapted" to the US (like Cardcaptors!).
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Semidi » Thu Apr 03, 2008 2:20 pm UTC

I usually always prefer subbing in my foreign films, but it has backfired on me. I got the movie Stalker, originally in Russian, and found that either I could look at the beautiful shots, or I could read the subtitles. I ended up have the pause and go back to read or look at the shot; such a beautiful movie, it's a shame the words got in the way.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Windsor » Sat Apr 05, 2008 5:47 am UTC

I voted for subs because dubs are so often atrocious. I like peoples' voices to sound like their personalities, and the approximately 7 American voice actors rarely get it right. If they could dub it right, with cultural translations and Woolseyisms, I wouldn't watch subs at all.

What's worse than having the same voice for every teenage girl is having a celebrity voice actor who can't voice act. Like princess whatsit in Castle in the Sky. They got Anna Paquin for the English dub and she couldn't decide between an American accent and an atrocious British accent.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Tajfoon » Sat Apr 05, 2008 2:55 pm UTC

Subtitles definately, can't stand dubbing. Except for animated films.

But im swedish and have been watching subtitled television and movies since as long as i can remember. And because of that I don't have the problem many have stated in this thread about choosing between watching the pictures and reading the subtitles, for me i don't even notice im reading subtitles after a couple of minutes.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby SecondTalon » Sat Apr 05, 2008 5:15 pm UTC

Windsor wrote:What's worse than having the same voice for every teenage girl is having a celebrity voice actor who can't voice act. Like princess whatsit in Castle in the Sky. They got Anna Paquin for the English dub and she couldn't decide between an American accent and an atrocious British accent.


While I'll give you that it's "her fault" for not pulling off the accent well... isn't it more the fault of the director for not smacking her upside the head, saying "Pick an accent, damnit!" and having her start again?
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Gelsamel » Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:18 am UTC

I hate it when they translate works like Ittadakimasu etc. As cathrl mentioned It takes away from the atmosphere of watching something from Japan, in the context of japanese culture etc. Puns should always have notes explaining why it's funny in their culture.

Also, while I don't want exactly literal translations, I would prefer it if there were two uses of the word "world" in the subtitle if I hear them say "sekai" twice etc.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Guest » Tue Oct 28, 2008 2:23 am UTC

In my experience subbing is better because if you can't understand the language, every actor is a good actor, especially voice acting. You can't tell nearly as well when someone is acting crappily and it doesn't ruin the movie, because the nuances that make an actor bad are actually quite small and probably unrecognisable if you don't knwo the language. It even goes the other way, once I was watching a cartoon originally in English and I found the actors to be terrible and annoying so I changed the language and turned on the subtitles and suddenly it became much more bearable.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Xeio » Tue Oct 28, 2008 6:56 am UTC

Guest wrote:In my experience subbing is better because if you can't understand the language, every actor is a good actor, especially voice acting. You can't tell nearly as well when someone is acting crappily and it doesn't ruin the movie, because the nuances that make an actor bad are actually quite small and probably unrecognizable if you don't know the language. It even goes the other way, once I was watching a cartoon originally in English and I found the actors to be terrible and annoying so I changed the language and turned on the subtitles and suddenly it became much more bearable.
This says more of ignorance than anything though. I mean, I'm not going to stop you from enjoying something the way you like to, I just don't understand the whole 'subs are better' argument a lot of people have when this is usually the case (not you specifically, but you make a really good point).

Granted, it should probably be noted that any blanket statements are totally unfounded from either side. There are excellent dubs (better than the originals, according to some), and there are terrible dubs, and then most fall in the average category (they are neither significantly worse/better than the original), where honestly it's more up to personal preference than which is actually 'better'. It just exacerbates the problem that not understanding the language skews your perception of it, as well as many people watch one, then dislike the other just because it's not the same.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Mzyxptlk » Tue Oct 28, 2008 9:15 am UTC

On the rare occasions that I watch something in a language I don't understand, I have a strong preference for subs, almost to the point that I'll refuse to watch anything that's dubbed. In my opinion there is more worth in hearing the original actors' voices (and language!) while simultaneously reading the translation, than in just hearing the translated dubbed voices (which are often worse than the original, and even when better, convey a different atmosphere than it).

Of course it helps that I've been familiar with subtitles since early childhood; subtitles are what taught me English, before I started reading English books. Reading subtitles does not distract me from the scene itself. In fact, maybe "reading" is not the right word; it implies actively engaging with the words, while with me it's more something that I do on another level altogether. When I watch a movie in an unknown language, the subtitles seem to filter in automatically, it's not an active process. I think it can be compared to playing a video game while a conversation takes place in the room you're in. You can hear it, but you aren't necessarily actively listening. Nevertheless, you know what's being said, you'll even laugh when a joke is made.

Does that make any sense whatsoever or do I sound like a rambling madman? Or both?
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby lorenith » Tue Oct 28, 2008 6:47 pm UTC

Otter/Duck

It depends, normally it's nicer sub'd, especially with live action stuff.

But when you get into the realm of animated stuff, it really really depends on the voice actors, sometimes the original cast is better sometimes the english cast is better.

If you want to get into anime, I generally prefer subed, cause I have very very very basic Japanese understand (that is, I can't actually speak or understand it, but because I took some classes I still have a bit of a feel for some things and the meaning, cause it isn't always translated correctly even subed).

Also, in the case of anime, a lot of the time the Japanese vocal tendencies are just more spirited to me, and also sounds they may make with their voice when surprised, or aggravated. This isn't normally the case with English, and oftetimes if it's tried, it sounds very unnatural.

I make exceptions for when the english cast is better though, because I do enjoy not having to read the subs if I don't have to, I'm a very fast reader, but sometimes I'm still not fast enough to be able to watch the action and read the subs without pausing.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Aradae » Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:14 am UTC

Subtitles for anime though I do have some exceptions. If the setting is in an English speaking country (Hellsing, Code Geass) then I watch it dubbed.

I don't usually watch foreign live action films.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Rinsaikeru » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:14 am UTC

While I agree that sometimes the translations suffer from bizarre acculturation, I think the subber has to keep in mind an audience that isn't familiar with any foreign terms at all. While you learn many things when you watch lots of films in a particular foreign language--like ittadakimasu, sempai, and aniki--there has to be a translation in the subtitling to reflect the meaning of the term. Reading copious translation notes (while appealing for some) turns lots of people off as well. Also I have twitchy memories of trying to freeze marmalade boy on vhs to read translation notes that were always blurry. It may have permanently strained my eyes :P.

Lots of directly translated japanese sayings sound hokey, preposterous or overly sentimental in english--but you get used to understanding that there is a different culture at play. I think my favourite ittadakimasu attempt is 'thank you for the food.' I tolerate, but get annoyed by the alteration of sound effect phrases from characters...like Sakura's 'hoe' from CCS that got turned into something valleygirlish that I refuse to recall or look up.

A good subtitler can substitute a similar colloqualism so that meaning is retained. If you're a purist--learn the language and stop using subtitles. Barring that deal with minor inadequacies in the process of translating anything.

Also, dubs are pretty awful live action or animated--the tone of the original actor is always lost and they rarely cast properly. The only time it's worthwhile is for the sake of hilarity, though Ranma 1/2 isn't dubbed too badly--they even translated Kuno's classical babblings into Shakespeare which was a very apt comparison.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby lorenith » Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:13 pm UTC

I think the thing I hate most in translation of stuff is when they don't translate something on purpose and leave it in the original language.

This applies to subs, but it bugs me a lot more on the rare occasion I'm reading a manga, For example I skimmed the first volume of the someones translation of the sailor moon manga, they left all the honorifics in it, and didn't translate some wordsn Like the Silver Crystal they left as "Maboroshi no Ginzuisho" as if that makes it more special or something?

I dunno it just seems silly to me, fortunately it's very rare for me to come across things that have been sub'ed like that, but I hate it with a burning passion. I rather enjoy reading translators notes over getting something translated completely different from what was said just because of a cultural difference, or puns. But yeah, maybe I just have a better appreciation/tolerance for different cultures.

I'm not going to learn Japanese or any other language just so I can watch stuff in the original language without subtitles, that would be a waste of my time since I hardly watch English shows/movies, much less stuff in other languages, which is why I'd rather see something translated correctly in the first place.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Liet Kynes » Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

subtitles. I think we all know "DO NOT WANT!"

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby ubel » Tue Nov 04, 2008 5:49 pm UTC

Subtitles most definitely but my reasoning isn't so much for subbing as it is against dubbing. The creator of the work chose that person and their voice because the actor's abilities, emotions, and nuances portrayed what they were looking for in the character. Dubbing can, and often does, change our perception of who the character is. Just try to imagine, if you can, a 30 year old Japanese man throwing grenades down elevator shafts, running across broken window glass in his barefeet, and breaking terrorists' necks while screaming... "Yippie Kay-Ay Mother FUCKER!".

No way. That shit just isn't happening, no matter how you put it. The script's character developments, actions, choices are still there.. all the important things to give us an understanding of who Mr. McClane is.. but I bet if you sat a group of moviegoers down to watch the same movie they'd leave scratching their heads and thinking something along the lines of "Great movie but... why him?"

Things change substantially, however, if the creator is extremely fluent in both languages, and has a hand in choosing the voice overs :D

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Random832 » Tue Nov 04, 2008 6:01 pm UTC

mosc wrote:can I point to an example of where dubbing can work and is superior?

Cowboy Bebop


I actually watched a subbed episode of Cowboy Bebop quite recently, and I would dispute this.

Yes, the dub is good. Yes, the characters (especially Spike) have a very different feel to them in one vs the other. But, "superior"? The dub is better? I don't think it's really something you can simply compare and say that one is better.

That said - there are bad dubs. There are bad subs. There are even bad original voice tracks. Whether one way is better than another in all cases, though, I don't think is really a good question to be asking.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby lorenith » Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:14 pm UTC

Most people actually do feel the Cowboy Bebop dub is better than the sub, I personally only saw a little bit subbed and I prefer it dubed, but when you really get into it, both the original voices and the dubed voices for cowboy bebop sound a bit forced/bad to me.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby fersrs » Sun Nov 09, 2008 1:44 am UTC

I usually watch dubs to get a bit of a feel for another language, and to keep myself focused on just one thing. I read pretty quickly so I can correspond some of the English and Japanese (or whatever) words.Also, when I watch dubs or something in English on the computer go onto a ton of different tabs and maybe eve have conversations while "watching" the show or movie. It becomes part of the background noise, and if I can't fully understand what's going on in the show it defeats the purpose of watching it in the first place. When I'm devoting most of my attention to it, it's much more enjoyable and I can remember more of it afterwords.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Xeio » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:54 am UTC

fersrs wrote:I usually watch dubs to get a bit of a feel for another language, and to keep myself focused on just one thing. I read pretty quickly so I can correspond some of the English and Japanese (or whatever) words.Also, when I watch dubs or something in English on the computer go onto a ton of different tabs and maybe eve have conversations while "watching" the show or movie. It becomes part of the background noise, and if I can't fully understand what's going on in the show it defeats the purpose of watching it in the first place. When I'm devoting most of my attention to it, it's much more enjoyable and I can remember more of it afterwords.
This seems to say more that you have to be forced to watch something to enjoy it... :? If you were really interested in the show, you'd probably watch it regardless of whether or not you HAVE to pay attention to it.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby drop » Sun Nov 09, 2008 6:12 am UTC

Definitely dubbing. I hate watching the subtitles - this way I miss a lot of the things that are happening. Also it means that I have to focus all the time at the screen (cannot eat etc.). I hate anime without dubs for example - the Japanese actually sounds a bit silly for me.

As for dubbing - there are actually two ways of doing it. I live in Poland, and here, for some weird reason (probably costs in the past and then the habit (!) of the viewers) the films are "semi dubbed". Basically there is ONE person (lector in English?) reading all the lines for all the characters (either male, or female etc.). The original soundtrack can be still heard, at something like 30-40% of the volume (basically the lector is reading the lines on top of the original lines). This way you can hear the original voice of the actors and not have to focus on reading the subtitles (very useful with TV - you can do other stuff while watching it).
There is also the other way of dubbing films - the traditional dubbing (as in cartoons) - personally I think it is the best. The "lector method" I described above, often leads to hearing that the translations are poor/censored ("oh fuck" becomes "oh dang" etc); and can be really strange when there are few people having a conversation (especially a man and a woman).

The funnies thing is that various TV channels try to introduce the "standard" dubbing from time to time, but it usually irritates the people, who get used to a single lector! Even introducing two lectors (a male and female for example - to read the texts according to the sex) have failed!
As many movies in Polish TV are dubbed, I got used to dubbing (not the "lector" dubbing though); and I cannot imagine watching TV with subtitles only.

On the other hand, at the cinemas are the movies are subtitled (with the only exception being animations/movies for kids).

I think you, as americans, have a different perspective - subtitles are convenient when you are watching something "you really want to watch". For casual watching (when you do other things) they are quite poor (well, most of the popular films are in English, so you can just listen; but imagine watching anime this way for example).

btw. Am I the only one, who uses subtites to speed up watching the movies? Some media players (I use BestPlayer 2.0) allow to comfortably fast forward using the arrow key (when "nothing is happening on the screen" - e.g. "talking heads" you can just press a key and read the subttiles quickly). The Asian movies come to my mind - usually there is static nothing happening on screen, then 2 minutes of talking, then static image again, then some talk, brutal scene, end of the movie. (2hour movies can be watched in like 15 minutes and you dont lose any part of the plot).

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Cynical Idealist » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:42 am UTC

oxoiron wrote:
firer wrote:
Minchandre wrote:the voices always end up completely unsuitable

So true.

The chosen voice is an integral part of character; changing voices, generally, end up changing the character considerably. Also, I think the voice of the dubs are usually quite less expressive than their original counterparts.

Or even worse, overly expressive.


Dear god, yes. Example: go find the first episode of Neon Genesis Evangelion, the subtitled version. Go to the part right after the cruise missiles hit the Angel. The pilot says, translated, "All the missiles hit the target!" in a voice that sounds stressed and disbelieving, but professional (well, then he gets to the utter panic mode, but he just got hit with the lance of light, so it still fits). It fits the scene, and establishes that this is a competent military force that still can't touch this THING which is attacking.

In the dub? Not so much.
Last edited by Cynical Idealist on Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:53 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Gelsamel » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:50 am UTC

Or they decide not to change the Japanese character's names but they decide to pronounce it like it's an English word....
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
"Do you admit there is no meaning to this world?"
- > No

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby lorenith » Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:48 am UTC

Yeah cause the Japanese totally don't take English words and names all the time and pronounce them like Japanese words, oh wait they do. :P

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Gelsamel » Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:57 am UTC

lorenith wrote:Yeah cause the Japanese totally don't take English words and names all the time and pronounce them like Japanese words, oh wait they do. :P


Well.. I'm talking about names. Anyway, that doesn't make it right. It's a name, it's pronounced and spelled a specific way. Ie. The name is "Koh-nah-tah" not "Ko-nar-tar" (Seriously what the fuck?).

Japanese doesn't have as many sounds as English so it can be hard for people whose native tongue is Japanese to speak English words but there is no excuse for people whose native tongue is English to egregiously mispronounce Japanese words ESPECIALLY names.
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
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- > No

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby lorenith » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:05 am UTC

I guess I should start complaining about all the Japanese people that call me "Jishika" even when they CAN pronounce English words just fine, speaking habits go in both directions and can be broken in both directions.

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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby el_loco_avs » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:27 pm UTC

Tajfoon wrote:Subtitles definately, can't stand dubbing. Except for animated films.

But im swedish and have been watching subtitled television and movies since as long as i can remember. And because of that I don't have the problem many have stated in this thread about choosing between watching the pictures and reading the subtitles, for me i don't even notice im reading subtitles after a couple of minutes.


you know, for a while I thought that was just because I was just listening to the english and not reading it.
but it's just as easy with Chinese movies.


The only thing I only want to see dubbed in Dutch is Spongebob. Cause there's something very sinister going on in the English version.
Other stuff like Dexter's Lab is quite reversed. Dutch Dexter makes me... nauseous.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby Rinsaikeru » Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:18 pm UTC

Yes because Dexter's english voice is precisely the voice he ought to have--finding alternates in other languages seems like a very difficult task.

In terms of subtitles--I might like them more because I read inhumanly fast so I can still catch visual cues/details? Well not inhumanly, because as far as I've been told I'm comprised entirely of human parts--but I can read pretty quickly.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby the Cow » Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:22 pm UTC

Subs. Like to hear the vocal tone of the original without reinterpretation by a different actor/culture/language/director/writer, even if I do not understand the language.
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Re: Subtitling vs. dubbing

Postby BigBoss » Mon Nov 17, 2008 6:00 pm UTC

If i know i can watch the whole movie/show without looking away for too long I use subs. Otherwise its dubbed.
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Subs vs. Dubs (anime)

Postby sillybear25 » Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:50 am UTC

Merged from Religious Wars. - Hammer

Okay, it's time to open up the age-old anime debate: Subtitled or dubbed?

For me, it probably lies somewhere between "no preference" and "it depends." Some anime, like FLCL and Azumanga Daioh, have great voice acting in the english dub, so there's really no reason for me to watch the subtitled version. On the other hand, when I watched Neon Genesis Evangelion, I felt that the Japanese voice actors fit the characters better than the English voice actors. Both sides of the debate have their merits in my opinion, so I'm not going to take a side, I'm just setting up the arena for the debate. Ready, set, GO!
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