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Loud Jet Engine Speaker

Posted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 8:28 pm UTC
by Little Richie
Picture this:
An array of fast computer controlled valves hooked up to jet fuel. It would probably only work for low frequencies (if at all), but it would be freaking loud. We would have to account for the non-linearity of the expansion of the fuel as well. Perhaps it would prof better as an AM source apposed to FM.

Is this feasible?

Re: Loud Jet Engine Speaker

Posted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 8:45 pm UTC
by Dream
Little Richie wrote:An array o' fast computer controlled valves hooked up to jet fuel.

I don't quite understand, could you flesh out the idea more?

If you're interested in burning things to make sound try these:
Popular Electronics wrote:The Present UTC Setup. Figure 3 shows the basic components and their hookup. The output of a Sony 365 tape recorder is fed to the input of a McIntosh 75-watt amplifier and the amplifier's output to the 8-ohm secondary winding of a reverse-connected power output transformer. A Hewlett-Packard Model 712-B (500 volts d.c. at 200 mA) power supply is connected through the transformer's primary winding to the two tungsten (or carbon) electrodes which, immersed in the flame, are spaced 2 to 4 inches apart. Neither the spacing of the electrodes nor their positioning within the flame zone is particularly critical.

The welding torch, fueled by acetylene and oxygen and fitted with a #0 tip whose small opening produces an almost hissless flame, is the kind any welder might use. How the easily ionized alkali metal is introduced to the combustion zone is relatively non-critical too, except that for best results super-ionization should take place below the lowest electrode. That is, the lower, hotter part of the flame should be ionized so that the ions "float" upward, past both electrodes. (Lacking a sodium glass rod, an asbestos wick drawing from a salt solution quite readily achieves super-ionization.)

Operationally, the procedure works like this:

The torch is lighted and adjusted slightly on the "rich" fuel-mix side (more oxygen than acetylene). This makes for a hotter flame. The flame itself is adjusted for minimum hiss. What you get is a quiet, brilliant blue flame.

Now the power supply is turned on. With one eye on a milliammeter connected in series with the electrodes, the flame-speaker's operator begins to "seed" (if he's "seeding" with a sodium glass rod, he gently intrudes its end into the base of the flame). As the flame turns brilliant orange, indicating super-ionization, he adjusts the power supply, flame controls, and the sodium rod for maximum current-which may go as high as 200 to 300 mA.

Finally, the tape recorder is turned on. And from the flame booms amplified sound.


Or alternatively, a plasma speaker?

Re: Loud Jet Engine Speaker

Posted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:08 am UTC
by Little Richie
Those are both somewhat similar to what I'm proposing, and really freaking cool. I'll draw up some diagrams to better illustrate my idea.

Re: Loud Jet Engine Speaker

Posted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:40 am UTC
by Adhori Yaadin
but it would be freaking loud. We would have to account for the non-linearity of the expansion of the fuel as well


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Arslan1

Re: Loud Jet Engine Speaker

Posted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 5:00 pm UTC
by somitomi
This sounds like something Disaster Area* would use on one of their concerts. I think the throttle-response of jet engines is too slow for that though, the fast spinning compressor and turbine blades have a large angular momentum.

*Disaster Area: a rock band appearing in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. They are so loud they play their instruments remotely from a spacecraft in orbit around the planet (not necessarily the one hosting the concert).