Worst/Overrated books.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby darth.malie » Thu Sep 18, 2008 11:39 pm UTC

l33t_sas wrote:
Decker wrote:This is going to get me lynched and I know it, especially if I say it now.

I'm going to say it anyway.

Although I have only read two books, them being Bluebeard and Slaughterhouse 5, I do not like them. I might have picked bad books to introduce myself to Kurt Vonnegut, but I just don't like him so far. He just seem to be offensive for the sake of being offensive.

However, if someone can recommend me something different that I MAY like, I'm will to not write him off completely.


Hmm... It's not really representative of the typical Vonnegut (at least what I've read) but Player Piano is very good dystopian fiction in the style of 1984. Breakfast of Champions is my other favourite, it's hilarious.



Breakfast of Champions should be read before any judgement is passed on Vonnegut. After you have read that, feel free to hate him as much as you want to, as long as you hate him rationally.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby psyck0 » Thu Sep 18, 2008 11:49 pm UTC

Anything by Bronte or Austin.

Eugh. Cannot read. So BORING. And Austin's books just made me want to kill all the characters because they're so stuck up and rich and disgusting even though I know it was satire. That makes it bad satire.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Decker » Fri Sep 19, 2008 12:07 am UTC

darth.malie wrote:
l33t_sas wrote:
Decker wrote:This is going to get me lynched and I know it, especially if I say it now.

I'm going to say it anyway.

Although I have only read two books, them being Bluebeard and Slaughterhouse 5, I do not like them. I might have picked bad books to introduce myself to Kurt Vonnegut, but I just don't like him so far. He just seem to be offensive for the sake of being offensive.

However, if someone can recommend me something different that I MAY like, I'm will to not write him off completely.

Hmm... It's not really representative of the typical Vonnegut (at least what I've read) but Player Piano is very good dystopian fiction in the style of 1984. Breakfast of Champions is my other favourite, it's hilarious.

Breakfast of Champions should be read before any judgement is passed on Vonnegut. After you have read that, feel free to hate him as much as you want to, as long as you hate him rationally.

I'll take it out of the library and try my best to approach it without any biases.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Snicklefrits » Sun Sep 21, 2008 4:55 am UTC

I heard a lot of hype about William Faulkner... imagine my disappointment as I trudged through The Sound and the Fury. I finished it through sheer willpower, but now I'm soured on Faulkner for good.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Valarauka » Thu Sep 25, 2008 12:57 am UTC

Ok, this has to be said. David Eddings' entire Belgariad and Malloreon series, along with Belgarath the Sorceror. The dude wrote ELEVEN BOOKS in which essentially the same thing happens over and over and over. They came highly recommended, so I slogged through them, and sure they may have been mildly entertaining while I was reading them but by the end I felt utterly ripped off. There's absolutely no character development whatsoever, we're introduced to this bunch of stereotypical fantasy heroes who then spend the next ten books traveling together and chatting with each other and not doing much else. One entire book was spent chasing through the countryside for months and months, following this child who'd been kidnapped and almost catching up in every chapter. There's all this bullshit about the great battle between good and evil and how there are these "crisis points" which shift the balance one way or the other, but EVERY SINGLE TIME the stakes are all-or-nothing: If the evil side wins, it's all over! Of course the good guys win every single one, but you'd think they'd make some freaking headway. Why can't it ever be all over for the bad guys? But no, that has to wait for another nine books until Eddings finally decides to stop drawing out the torture and conclude the damn thing.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Lycur » Sat Oct 04, 2008 8:34 pm UTC

Valarauka wrote:Ok, this has to be said. David Eddings' entire Belgariad and Malloreon series, along with Belgarath the Sorceror. The dude wrote ELEVEN BOOKS in which essentially the same thing happens over and over and over. They came highly recommended, so I slogged through them, and sure they may have been mildly entertaining while I was reading them but by the end I felt utterly ripped off. There's absolutely no character development whatsoever, we're introduced to this bunch of stereotypical fantasy heroes who then spend the next ten books traveling together and chatting with each other and not doing much else. One entire book was spent chasing through the countryside for months and months, following this child who'd been kidnapped and almost catching up in every chapter. There's all this bullshit about the great battle between good and evil and how there are these "crisis points" which shift the balance one way or the other, but EVERY SINGLE TIME the stakes are all-or-nothing: If the evil side wins, it's all over! Of course the good guys win every single one, but you'd think they'd make some freaking headway. Why can't it ever be all over for the bad guys? But no, that has to wait for another nine books until Eddings finally decides to stop drawing out the torture and conclude the damn thing.


These made absolutely fantastic kids books. If you think of them as directly competing with Harry Potter you can see how they'd be loved. As an adult they do seem rather simplistic.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Jebobek » Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:34 am UTC

I always thought the World Atlas was too overdone.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby JayDee » Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:34 am UTC

Valarauka wrote:The dude wrote ELEVEN BOOKS in which essentially the same thing happens over and over and over.
I still recommend them, but I'm sure to point this out. His other series I've read are the same, with an ever so slightly different cast.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Loki Motive » Mon Oct 13, 2008 7:47 am UTC

Joyce bashing is a time honored tradition and it makes perfect sense given the apparent universal acclaim Ulysses seems to get from the intelligentsia in relation to how seemingly unreadable the damn thing is. Personally I think Ulysses is alternately interesting, beautiful, hilarious and mind numbingly stupid. I've read it three times all the way through and each time my opinion of different sections alternates between those three emotions (though the Oxen of the Sun section is almost entirely mind numbingly stupid). Anyway, I think the book is great but, good Lord, I would never say that it's my favorite book and I would be even less likely to recommend it without a whole heap of caveats. I think anyone that berates anyone for not liking Ulysses (after an honest attempt) is just being a dick. It's a hard book. It can be fun but only if you're in the right mindset. The fact that it rates so high on lists is simply due to how much critical effort has been put into it and how proud professors are that they've finished it. The Joyce scholar's I've met would be the first to admit that it can be an incredible slog.

So despite my general ambivalence towards Joyce, I would never consider him overrated. He is only highly rated in academia and even then with some sort of trepidation. If you ever meet someone at a party who says that their favorite book is Ulysses without the least bit of shame or awareness of how pompous that seems, that is a person you don't want to know.

That being said, anyone who doesn't like 'The Dead' has no soul.

Getting back to the topic at hand, though. Man, I do not understand the appeal of 'Catcher in the Rye.' I read it as a sophomore in College (in 2001) and could not understand why I was bothering. It had nothing to do with any feeling of irrelevancy to modern times (such as the professor in the NPR link someone gave previously), I just found nothing interesting in it.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby smw543 » Sun Oct 26, 2008 2:49 pm UTC

Hi. My name is Scott and I'm a recovering objectivist; sober eight years now. (I was seduced when I read Atlas Shrugged in fifth grade and it took two years to break the spell.)

Pretty much everything else worth mentioning has been said, so I'll move straight to the defenses.

Many of the pieces criticized here, such as Dubliners, are being viewed out of context, I think. When we read excerpts from Dubliners in my AP Lit class back in high school, a lot of people hated them, yet they didn't even know where the stories took place. Yes, it's in the title, and they would have figured it out eventually, but the point is that one of the central themes was Joyce's ambivalent feelings toward his countrymen. I'm not saying you have to read a biography of the man and a comprehensive analysis of Irish culture before reading Dubliners, but if you don't know jack shit about him or his society, you're probably not going to like it or even understand what he's talking about. This is why college-level literature classes all have themes, such as English Literature II, which focuses on English Literature (go figure) from the late 1700's to the early 1900's. Specifically, the first half of the semester is built around the Romantic movement, while the second half is concerned with the Victorian Age.

Which brings me to my next point; there's a reason why it's often called the Victorian Age as opposed to the Victorian movement or era; the themes are far from unified; most of the works from the time held only a few common elements. True, a lot of Victorian lit was total trash, but there was good stuff, too. For example, Dickens sucked because all he did was push his agenda of social reform, often at the expense of good story-telling. Gaskell, meanwhile, was just as effective at making her point (often the exact same points Dickens intended,) while simultaneously moving a plot and developing characters.

Concerning this issue of judging a book without finishing it; this is sometimes justified, such as in the case of the already thoroughly bashed Eragon. But in the case of classics, and I mean real, widely-accepted-as-such classics, I have the right to call bull. Namely, on the issue of War and Peace, which ties in with the first point. If you're really unfamiliar with the Napoleonic Wars and with Russian culture of the time, you're just not gonna get it. There's nothing wrong with that; I don't judge you for it. I do, however, judge you for trashing it.

On a side note; when attaining a copy of a classic, be careful which edition you get. The 1818 edition of Frankenstein is much better, for example, then any of the later versions which are, unfortunately, more commonly read. Consult with your english major friend, or, failing that, look for a Norton Critical Edition, which, in addition to usually using the best version, will also have a section in the back called "Contexts" that gives plenty of useful background information. Plus they have critical essays, if you're really lost.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Hentzau » Sun Oct 26, 2008 3:42 pm UTC

'Oryx and Crake' is pretty overrated. As is 'Eats, Shoots, and Leaves'.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Marbas » Mon Oct 27, 2008 12:40 am UTC

Hentzau wrote:As is 'Eats, Shoots, and Leaves'.


Are you kidding me? How could you not love pure distilled pedantry?
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby bennyprofane » Mon Oct 27, 2008 3:47 am UTC

Everything by Poe seems, to me, to be overrated crap. Oh, sure, he did develop psychoanalysis and, certainly, his stories showed a creeping surrealism mixed with cosmic horror and all, but his use of language, even for his time, is overly flowery and pedantic, he was off his rocker most of the time, and if you want good, crazy horror, you could just go buy a collection of Lovecraft's stories. Poe has always irritated me, and his stories have never really frightened me much--one of my teachers said it was because he was "dated." Dated--pah! Dated is work forgotten.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby felixalias » Mon Oct 27, 2008 4:03 am UTC

Brave New World.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby l33t_sas » Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:08 pm UTC

Hentzau wrote:'Oryx and Crake' is pretty overrated. As is 'Eats, Shoots, and Leaves'.


I loved Oryx and Crake :(

Is it really that overrated, I've not seen it in many favourites lists.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby SpiderMonkey » Wed Oct 29, 2008 9:01 pm UTC

smw543 wrote:Hi. My name is Scott and I'm a recovering objectivist; sober eight years now. (I was seduced when I read Atlas Shrugged in fifth grade and it took two years to break the spell.)


Hi Scott.

The fact that Ayn Rand's "Me first and only" philosophy found a fan in a ten year old boy speaks volumes about it. Only young boys, psychopaths and neoliberal economists can possibly hold such total egoism and selfishness to be a virtue.

On a side note; when attaining a copy of a classic, be careful which edition you get. The 1818 edition of Frankenstein is much better, for example, then any of the later versions which are, unfortunately, more commonly read. Consult with your english major friend, or, failing that, look for a Norton Critical Edition, which, in addition to usually using the best version, will also have a section in the back called "Contexts" that gives plenty of useful background information. Plus they have critical essays, if you're really lost.


My fiancee is quite critical of Frankenstein - she says it too obviously a decent short story surrounded by quite tedious filler to make up a novel.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby mythindril » Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:10 am UTC

Lord of the Rings. I read The Hobbit in middle school and I loved it, and at the insistence of one of my friends I read the first two books of the series. It was downright painful. It's a good story, but Tolkein for Pete's sakes TELL IT. He just rambles. On and on. About stuff that isn't even important. I spent an entire summer reading The Two Towers. I want that summer back!

I think The Great Gatsby is overrated. I mean, I love it, but as an "American masterpiece" I don't get it.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Ashi » Sat Nov 08, 2008 5:52 pm UTC

mythindril wrote:Lord of the Rings. I read The Hobbit in middle school and I loved it, and at the insistence of one of my friends I read the first two books of the series. It was downright painful. It's a good story, but Tolkein for Pete's sakes TELL IT. He just rambles. On and on. About stuff that isn't even important. I spent an entire summer reading The Two Towers. I want that summer back!

I think The Great Gatsby is overrated. I mean, I love it, but as an "American masterpiece" I don't get it.


I second the notion about The Great Gatsby, but I'd have to say I think that The Hobbit is overrated. I read it at recommendation, and enjoyed the plot... but nothing more. Great story, but it wasn't literature that I could thoroughly enjoy.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Immortal_Z » Mon Nov 10, 2008 1:51 am UTC

The entire Inheritance series (Eragon and company). The first time I read through, they were good books. Not the greatest, but good. Second time through (and this is just the first two books), a person notices the general lack of any real character development. The plot more than makes up for this, but the third book is terrible. They have this epic person who is supposed to hold all life dear and such, and they keep going on about the rush of battle and all. Its back and forth between those the whole book, and the bloody thing is a few hundred pages leading up to him getting a sword, and nothing else. I know the author had to split the book in two (there'll be a fourth one here eventually), but he should have just thinned it down instead of breaking it apart. Took way too damned long to read that.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby kinigget » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:04 am UTC

I'm sure this has been said many times already, but I believe it bears endless repetition. Do not bother to read past the first book of the Wheel of Time series. The Eye of The World is an excellent book and should be read. The Great Hunt is mind-numbingly boring. and besides that, you get this incredible urge to reach through the pages and bash rand's head in repeatedly.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby troacctid » Tue Apr 20, 2010 7:07 am UTC

SpiderMonkey wrote:
On a side note; when attaining a copy of a classic, be careful which edition you get. The 1818 edition of Frankenstein is much better, for example, then any of the later versions which are, unfortunately, more commonly read. Consult with your english major friend, or, failing that, look for a Norton Critical Edition, which, in addition to usually using the best version, will also have a section in the back called "Contexts" that gives plenty of useful background information. Plus they have critical essays, if you're really lost.


My fiancee is quite critical of Frankenstein - she says it too obviously a decent short story surrounded by quite tedious filler to make up a novel.

And so it is. The author even says as much in the introduction:
Mary Shelley wrote:At first I thought of but a few pages, of a short tale, but [Percy] Shelley urged me to develop the idea at greater length.

"Developing the idea at greater length" apparently means "Adding 200 pages of unnecessary detail about irrelevant characters and events." I would generously estimate that Frankenstein contains maybe about one paragraph's worth of plot per chapter. And it's really buried in there. When Frankenstein decides to destroy the female monster before animating her, he does it in less than a sentence, and in the middle of a paragraph that began describing the original monster's facial expressions. For comparison, the previous chapter went on at length for several pages describing the various countries and cities in Europe where Dr. Frankenstein was traveling. Bullshit.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Tue Apr 20, 2010 5:11 pm UTC

I always thought the character of Frankenstein was a subtle jab against Percy (the entire universe revolves around him, he acts like he's the only thing that has feelings, the murders are only important because they make him feel sad and guilty... and he never shuts up about the valley of woe he's in, just because he was an irresponsible jackass). It's a lot more interesting if you read it that way.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Okapi » Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:53 pm UTC

psyck0 wrote:Anything by Bronte or Austin.

Eugh. Cannot read. So BORING. And Austin's books just made me want to kill all the characters because they're so stuck up and rich and disgusting even though I know it was satire. That makes it bad satire.


Jane Austen? Are you kidding? Amazing authour!

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:26 pm UTC

Hi, you might like to meet my friend Mr. Opinion.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby smw543 » Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:15 am UTC

SpiderMonkey wrote:
smw543 wrote:On a side note; when attaining a copy of a classic, be careful which edition you get. The 1818 edition of Frankenstein is much better, for example, then any of the later versions which are, unfortunately, more commonly read. Consult with your english major friend, or, failing that, look for a Norton Critical Edition, which, in addition to usually using the best version, will also have a section in the back called "Contexts" that gives plenty of useful background information. Plus they have critical essays, if you're really lost.
My fiancee is quite critical of Frankenstein - she says it too obviously a decent short story surrounded by quite tedious filler to make up a novel.
Many great novels originated as short stories. Generally, the original was good, but some elements were underdeveloped and/or there were good opportunities for expansion. Granted, it's been a while since I've read it, but I can't think of a single major event or element that doesn't add to the overall piece, from the De Laceys, to Justine's trial and execution, to the epistolary frame. Perhaps she has a very broad definition of "short story"?

troacctid wrote:And so it is. The author even says as much in the introduction:
Mary Shelley wrote:At first I thought of but a few pages, of a short tale, but [Percy] Shelley urged me to develop the idea at greater length.
"Developing the idea at greater length" apparently means "Adding 200 pages of unnecessary detail about irrelevant characters and events." I would generously estimate that Frankenstein contains maybe about one paragraph's worth of plot per chapter. And it's really buried in there. When Frankenstein decides to destroy the female monster before animating her, he does it in less than a sentence, and in the middle of a paragraph that began describing the original monster's facial expressions. For comparison, the previous chapter went on at length for several pages describing the various countries and cities in Europe where Dr. Frankenstein was traveling. Bullshit.
She can be a bit heavy on detail at times, but I recall them being relevant to the story. To address your examples: his facial expressions are important because they humanize him, while showing how wrong Victor has been. As for the descriptions of the cities and countries, Shelley was a travel writer, and sometimes that crept into her other work. I mostly write short fiction, but also a good deal of poetry, so some of my stories end up with rather poetic language. You may not like either, but many would consider them an added flavor, and I don't think you can make a solid argument for why they're bad.

Hell, I'll even grant you that it could've been trimmed some, but if you think the story could've been told just as well in a 24-paragraph plot summary, I'll kindly ask you to go stand over on that big red X, along with the other Philistines (you can't miss it—it's directly under the100-ton anvil).

As for her resistance to expand the story, that had a lot more to do with her attitude towards artistic expression, especially in the context of Romanticism. I'm too lazy to get into it right now; long story short, she felt there was a lot of egotism involved.

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby pooteeweet » Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:00 pm UTC

Amberfire wrote:Harry Potter is just too insignificant in content to deserve its hype. I think people like Diana Wynne Jones do the same sort of things with better depth and better character. It's not even as mature or 'dark' as some YA fiction is. I don't understand why, though there's so much GOOD fantasy YA fiction, it's this vapid, unoriginal tripe that becomes popular; HP, Twilight, Eragon - which, I admit, I've never read, but never been inspired to either.


Ohmygod! I just looked up Diana Wynne Jones on a whim after reading your comment and discovered that she is the author of that series of wizardy books I really liked as a kid but couldn't remember the name or any useful descriptors of. Chrestomanci! Fuck yeah! That's been bugging me for years. Now does anyone remember some similar obscure fantasy kid's books that involved... uh... whales, and talking to inanimate objects?

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby El Spark » Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:11 pm UTC

pooteeweet wrote:Ohmygod! I just looked up Diana Wynne Jones on a whim after reading your comment and discovered that she is the author of that series of wizardy books I really liked as a kid but couldn't remember the name or any useful descriptors of. Chrestomanci! Fuck yeah! That's been bugging me for years. Now does anyone remember some similar obscure fantasy kid's books that involved... uh... whales, and talking to inanimate objects?


I can help with the whales, anyway.

I'm a teen librarian, so I tend to run across quite a few of the books that were anti-recommended earlier. I have specific, grave concerns about the Twilight series in general, and Eragon is just a combination of Star Wars and the author's D&D games (I have no proof of that, by the way, but come on. Just read the damn thing, and you'll understand...I kept expecting Chewbacca to show up). While there are some absolutely STELLAR teen books out there, Sturgeon's Law still holds. Some examples of anti-recommended teen books:

Angus, Thongs, and Full Frontal Snogging. Bridget Jones' Diary should sue, and then we can firebomb the courthouse when they're both in the same place. GOD I want those hours of my life back (also the lost IQ points). A friend of mine specifically uses slang from the Angus series just to watch me twitch.

The Clique series. Rich girls using impenetrable slang and being bitches toward each other. Oh, sign me UP.

My personal anti-favorite, and probably one that would never show up on your reading list anyway, is called Roar. It sounds good, and the premise has a lot of promise (there's premise-promise), but the author just can't keep it under control. Characters walk on and start to get interesting, and then they vanish for all time. Plot points show up out of nowhere and then just go away. I have no earthly clue what happened for the last twenty pages, and I re-read it three times. And what's with the monkey? At that point I didn't give a shit. I actually read the whole thing in a spirit of horrified fascination.

On the whole, though, I liked Roar more than Angus.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Solo » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:34 pm UTC

Immortal_Z wrote:The entire Inheritance series (Eragon and company). The first time I read through, they were good books. Not the greatest, but good. Second time through (and this is just the first two books), a person notices the general lack of any real character development. The plot more than makes up for this, but the third book is terrible. They have this epic person who is supposed to hold all life dear and such, and they keep going on about the rush of battle and all. Its back and forth between those the whole book, and the bloody thing is a few hundred pages leading up to him getting a sword, and nothing else. I know the author had to split the book in two (there'll be a fourth one here eventually), but he should have just thinned it down instead of breaking it apart. Took way too damned long to read that.

Did you notice that in the second book, Eragon our hero, vegetarian, and friend of animals, kills a small company of soldiers without remorse - soldiers who have swords - with his love interest, and then proceeds to move on and whine about not having a sword a few pagers later?

The thought of taking a sword off of a dead soldier apparently never occurred to him.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby BurningLed » Mon May 03, 2010 11:02 pm UTC

iirc, he also happens to have OP melee stats. He ended up shattering a finely-crafted Dwarven sword in a swing earlier xD

But yeah, I didn't like the third nearly as much as the first two.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby xepher » Tue May 04, 2010 9:03 pm UTC

On the subject of Lord of the Rings, how many people outside of me were tired of having the "it's an allegory for WWII" crap being shoved down their throat?

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby El Spark » Tue May 04, 2010 10:40 pm UTC

I've heard a dozen different symbolism-interpretations for the LotR. All I know is, the books bored the hell out of me. I made it through them out of sheer determination and a vague sense that I "should."
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Wed May 05, 2010 12:49 pm UTC

xepher wrote:On the subject of Lord of the Rings, how many people outside of me were tired of having the "it's an allegory for WWII" crap being shoved down their throat?

Tolkien felt the same way. My copy's introduction, at least, has him outline how differently the story would have gone if he had been writing a WWII allegory.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby socynicalsohip » Sun May 09, 2010 4:47 pm UTC

felixalias wrote:Brave New World.


Having just finished this book I couldn't disagree more!

I found it to be a compulsive page turner with some very deep philosophy buried in for good measure. To each their own and all but... you're wrong.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Kewangji » Sun May 09, 2010 10:34 pm UTC

socynicalsohip wrote:
felixalias wrote:Brave New World.


Having just finished this book I couldn't disagree more!

I found it to be a compulsive page turner with some very deep philosophy buried in for good measure. To each their own and all but... you're wrong.

I was recommended the book so fiercely that I think it must be overrated. Haven't read it, though.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby SecondTalon » Mon May 10, 2010 3:20 am UTC

felixalias wrote:Brave New World.

I think I'm just going to start deleting posts like this.

Is it really that hard to explain why you're mentioning the book in this thread?
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby Apteryx » Tue May 11, 2010 2:03 am UTC

Maybe we could have TWO of these threads.

One thread for young people who have not the least chance of correctly valuing an adult, thoughtful book about adult thoughtful topics, not because of any fault of their own, but simply and factually because they themselves basically are still learning to be adults.
And one thread for grown ups.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby big boss » Tue May 11, 2010 6:51 am UTC

I also found LotR to be an extremely difficult read and I read it just because I felt like I had to, but the hobbit on the other hand I thought was a great book and I read it in 2 days. Anyone else share a similar opinion of the hobbit?
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby PeterCai » Tue May 11, 2010 6:56 pm UTC

am i the only one here that love Hemmingway?

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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby MotorToad » Wed May 12, 2010 11:28 am UTC

PeterCai wrote:am i the only one here that love Hemmingway?

No. Most of his books that I've read (three? five?) I've really enjoyed. I never finished For Whom the Bell Tolls, though, as it was just too much dialog and never seemed to be getting anywhere. I think the same thing might be said of The Sun Also Rises but I freaking loved that book. Moods is moods, I suppose.
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Re: Worst/Overrated books.

Postby socynicalsohip » Wed May 12, 2010 6:59 pm UTC

Apteryx wrote:Maybe we could have TWO of these threads.

One thread for young people who have not the least chance of correctly valuing an adult, thoughtful book about adult thoughtful topics, not because of any fault of their own, but simply and factually because they themselves basically are still learning to be adults.
And one thread for grown ups.
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Or perhaps splitting the thread in two by "worst books" and then "overrated books" . A book can be overrated without being the worst book. I strikes me that by bunching the two together many people are trying to assert how different they are by going against the grain. Mind you I generally don't have much time for people.

Back on topic:

One of the most overrated books I ever read was when I was going through my 'Cuba' phase was Guevara's "Motorcycle Diaries". Perhaps it lost a lot in translation to English but I found it neither compulsive or particularly revealing. For me it failed both as an expose into the makings of such a cult figure and also failed as travel writing documenting South America.

I wouldn't go as far as saying it's a bad read, just not quite what I was expecting from the infamous Che.
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