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Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 8:08 pm UTC
by Isotope_238
I second The Martian. It was so engrossing that I read the whole thing in one sitting. I might have to stop being a Golden Age SF snob and start reading some newer science fiction.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Jul 22, 2014 1:07 pm UTC
by Edwards
The book I am reading at the moment is called "The man who forgot his wife" by John O'Farrell.
Its a mixture of romance and comedy, about a man that loses his memory.
I have read a few of his books. The style that he writes makes the books very readable.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:51 pm UTC
by addams
Edwards wrote:The book I am reading at the moment is called "The man who forgot his wife" by John O'Farrell.
Its a mixture of romance and comedy, about a man that loses his memory.
I have read a few of his books. The style that he writes makes the books very readable.

oh, Those are so fun.
It is sort of a Genre. (right?)

It is a Love Story.
Each time they meet, the Affection grows Anew.
Friends sometimes have that Conversation.

If we had met while you were Changing a Tire;
Would we have become friends?


Like a Dr. Seuss book.
Spoiler:
Under a Tire.
Up in a Tree.

No matter where you were or what you were doing,
I would have liked you.

Because, you are you.

Under a Tire.
Up in a Tree.
No matter where you were or what you were doing,
I would not have liked you, after I got to know you.

Because, you are you.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 5:27 am UTC
by Djehutynakht
I recently picked up a book of parables called The Wanderer by Khalil Gibran.

I liked them. It was short, but they were interesting and witty.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 11:07 pm UTC
by addams
There was a time when Khalil Gibran's The Prophet was required reading for a great many people.
It was sort of nice.

In most groups, we all had that one book in common.
We didn't have to like it. We had to understand it.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 5:02 pm UTC
by Vahir
I found War and Peace and War by Peter Turchin to be both interesting and enlightening. It analyzes the question of what causes empires to rise and fall, as well as the cycle of population in pre-industrial society, while avoiding being a dull read by presenting real world examples. I strongly recommend it for other history fanatics.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:02 am UTC
by moody7277
I was wondering if anyone familiar with Jeff Schaara's books knows of a treatment of the Napoleonic Wars done in a style similar to his?

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:53 pm UTC
by addams
I’d like to recommend a book.
This recommendation comes with Qualifiers.

The book is, “Man’s Search for Meaning’, by Dr. Victor Frankle.

The qualifiers are:
This book is not a book for Children.
This book is not a book for unguided UnderGrads.

You Children and UnderGrads have enough on your plates.
If you do the reading for your discipline, That’s Enough!

You have to know, Your Shit.
You don’t have to know, Everyone’s Shit.

Even if you are a Psych Major.
Victor Frankle is too advanced.

For everyone else.
‘Man’s Search of Meaning’ may have some meaning.

In Real Life I found it useful, again.
Somehow that book came up in conversation.

He had read it.
He seemed to respect the authorship.

It was like we knew the same person and had lived some of the same experiences.
There was a moment of recognition. A moment of understanding words can’t tell.

Knowing that we had both read that book replaced Hours of Small Talk.

[b"]How about those Jets?"[/b]
"Yeah. The Jets."

"They say we will be getting some rain."
"Yes. We need rain."

"….umm."
"Yeah. umm…"

"Victor Frankle?"
"oh! You, too?"
"ok. I’m comfortable with you."


It’s a small book.
It fits neatly in the back pocket of a pair of jeans.

Some Post-Grads wear Jeans.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 7:12 pm UTC
by emceng
moody7277 wrote:I was wondering if anyone familiar with Jeff Schaara's books knows of a treatment of the Napoleonic Wars done in a style similar to his?


For naval combat in the Napoleonic era, try the Horatio Hornblower books and the Master and Commander series.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 11:54 am UTC
by chad23
Hope the thread is still alive :)
I'm reading Awakenings by Oliver Sacks and want to recommend this book. It tells story of epidemic survivors after World War I who awoke after years of lethargical sleep. Very intersting and humane.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 12:48 pm UTC
by tarascon
I read almost every page of this thread and there are some great suggestions. Quoting mengelji: "... Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban (read it aloud to yourself) - A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess." Hoban was going to be my first suggestion. It's fun!
The OP goes back a number of years so my contribution may well be far too late and you may have read this already (I did a search to see if it's been posted). I'd say try Italo Svevo's Confessions of Zeno.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 12:50 pm UTC
by Izawwlgood
Whelp, I stayed up until 3am lastnight reading Seveneves. "Just One More Page" hasn't happened to me in a long time.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 1:36 pm UTC
by tarascon

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 5:19 pm UTC
by Artemisia
I have a recommendation! A book I didn't think I needed until I read it and my mind is blown.

Come as You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life, by Emily Nagoski Ph.D.

So the first thing I like is that it's really well-researched, scientific and written by an expert:
thedirtynormal wrote: http://www.thedirtynormal.com/about/about-emily/ Emily has a Ph.D. in Health Behavior with a doctoral concentration in human sexuality from Indiana University (IU), and a Master’s degree (also from IU) in Counseling, with a clinical internship at the Kinsey Institute Sexual Health Clinic. She also has a B.A. in Psychology, with minors in cognitive science and philosophy, from the University of Delaware.

While at IU, Emily worked as an educator and docent at the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex Gender and Reproduction. She also taught graduate and undergraduate classes in human sexuality, relationships and communication, stress management, and sex education.


The second thing I like is that it offers a deeper understanding about woman's relationship to sex which has been a topic of exploration all my life (good and bad) and I already like(d) to think I knew and understood quite a lot about sex, having overcome quite a few boundaries over the years. I trust that I am not the only one who finds this topic important and interesting.

The last thing I like is that it blew my mind with how much more insight I gained not only about women's sexuality, but about women in general and how much it resonated with me in other aspects of my life. It hit a nerve, and that's an understatement. I have to put a trigger warning on it for women with sexual trauma, though Emily does give trigger warnings in a few instances when she gives examples and you can skip the passage without it diminishing your understanding of the premise.

Rachel Manwill wrote: From http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22609341-come-as-you-are
Using actual, real science, Dr. Emily Nagoski – a speak-the-truth-and-only-the-truth sex educator/professor – breaks down all the things we think we know about sex and desire and drive and, in the process, makes you feel like not are you normal, but we’re ALL normal. As she says over and over and over, “We’re all made up of the same basic parts, just organized differently.” In other words, there is no normal. This is a game changer of a human sexuality book – not just for women, who have always been told that men’s sexuality is the default (HINT: it’s not) – but for men who love women and don’t understand why the things that work for them, don’t work for women. Just….just go buy this. Buy this and read it and try not to be that weird person pushing a sex book on every single lady person you know. Because these are all lessons we need to learn. Better for us, better for everyone.


The comic Ohjoysextoy.com sums up a few important highlights of the book: read the comic here

Although it is geared towards women, I trust this will be insightful to anyone who has ever been in the proximity of one.

[edit] another Goodread review that sums up my response pretty well:
Callista wrote:You don't need to read this if you meet all the following criteria: you've never felt ashamed or [b]othered for your emotional response to anything, you've got the stress cycle down pat, you know that sex isn't a drive, you've never had a sexual or emotional response that you didn't utterly understand and agree with, and you don't know anyone that ever has.

Yeah, you need to read this.

One note, however. If you, like me, have been blaming yourself for everything under the sun your whole life, it will be difficult to read. If you avoid hugs because they make you cry, if words get stuck in your throat until you feel like you're suffocating, you have to read this. You won't enjoy it, not really, but you need it.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 12:49 pm UTC
by Zohar
At a friend's recommendation I got around to reading Ted Chiang's Stories of Your Life and Others. I'm only up to the 3rd story, but so far it has been very, very good. It seems a lot of people love the "Understand" story, which I found interesting, but not as emotionally impacting and surprising as Babylon. Now reading Division by Zero, which is its own sort of fascinating mind-horror.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Mon Jun 06, 2016 7:50 am UTC
by Kalium_Puceon
Isotope_238 wrote:I second The Martian. It was so engrossing that I read the whole thing in one sitting. I might have to stop being a Golden Age SF snob and start reading some newer science fiction.


Dang, The Martian is such a fun book and really refreshing if you're a big science geek, because it at least tries to make some physical sense when it comes to the science parts.

Otherwise, Sam Kean writes a really cool set of non-fiction books called The Disappearing Spoon, The Violinist's Thumb and The Tale of the Duelling Neurosurgeons, which are about the Elements of the Perioidic Table, Genetics and Neuroscience respectively. The books tell the story of how particular facets of each field were discovered, and so cover more than just the science but also the unusual characters and circumstances surrounding them. They're really interesting reads and good if you want a quick overview of the history of the fields (for instance, the Neuroscience one begins in the mid 1500's.)

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 10:20 am UTC
by samuelgorbold
I'm reading right now The Magus (1965) is a postmodern novel by British author John Fowles. It's my second time reading this book.
I totally recommend it.
The most exciting descriptions of characters' feelings.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:46 pm UTC
by Izawwlgood
I just read the first book in Max Gladstones Craft sequence, and found it to be entertaining and thought provoking, if beyond campy. Gargoyles vs Vampires are silly window dressing to a pretty cool theology war.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 12:48 am UTC
by Liri
For some very unique Australian post-apocalyptic fiction, read "Souls in the Great Machine" by Sean McMullen. It's the first in a trilogy.

It's really weird. There are no good (as in, good people) characters with more than 5 lines. No one to empathize with. Requires a good sense of direction.

The second two are even more opaque. Lots of characters, all of them dicks. They're also uncomfortably rapey (not that much but more than 0). I didn't feel good after finishing them, but it's refreshing (?) to be made to feel discomfort every now and then.

If this still sounds like a recommendation, then great, if not, that's okay too.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:00 pm UTC
by heuristically_alone
The Alien Invasion thread keeps making me think of the series by Orson Scott Card First Formic War Trilogy . An interesting take on what human civilization will be like and how we react to our first alien encounter. Also an orgin stories prequel to Ender's Game. Pretty phenominal.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:43 pm UTC
by Zohar
I liked Orson Scott Card when I first started reading sci-fi in high school, but I've noticed while he writes relationships fairly well, his stories didn't hold up to other writers, IMO. Combine that with his deplorable political opinions and how he keeps pushing them using his capital, I'm really not interested in investing anything in him - time, money, or attention.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Jul 28, 2017 7:29 pm UTC
by Mat
I recently finished the Remembrance of Earth's past series by Liu Cixin, which is incredible. Hard scifi where everything goes wrong for humanity.

The first book feels more grounded as it's set in the 20th/21st century (starting with the cultural revolution), while the other two skip further and further into the future, but all three were really interesting.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:00 am UTC
by Plasmic-Turtle
Just finished Adam Johnson's set of short stories, "Fortune Smiles": first Adam Johnson I've read, really enjoyed it. Well crafted.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:55 am UTC
by nightbird
I can't recommend China Mievielle's Bas-Lag novels "Perdido Street Station", "The Scar" and "Iron Council" enough. Inventive, subversive high fantasy with a touch of Lovecraft in it.

Other books I recently read and liked:

"Job" by Joseph Roth. To quote Wikipedia, "It tells the story of an orthodox Jew whose faith is weakened when he moves from Tsarist Russia to New York City." Published in 1931.

"Cloud Atlas" by David Mitchell

"Cryptonomicon" by Neal Stephenson

And if you want something light, I still quite like "he died with a felafel in his hand" by John Birmingham. A collection of anecdotes from shared house life in 1990s Australia.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:14 pm UTC
by Zohar
I never particularly enjoyed China Mievielle. He feels tedious to read. cloud Atlas was pretty good though.

Finished reading Edge of Dark by Brenda Cooper. It was very good, if you're into futuristic sci-fi AI-human interaction stuff. It's part of a larger universe and has a bunch of sequels, but this is the first of hers I've read.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 7:04 am UTC
by emceng
I highly recommend "The Library at Mount Char". First novel by the author, but does not feel like it. Followed it up with Shadow and Bone...eesh. Maybe it's because I didn't know it was YA when I got it...but damn, it is just not in the same league.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:00 am UTC
by Liri
The Core of the Sun, by Johana Sinisalo
Finnish weird, Atwoodian dystopia, spicy chilis

The Bees, by Laline Paull
life as a bee, scientifically literate, some bees are more equal than others

Suttree, by Cormac McCarthy
life in a houseboat, series of vignettes, scrumptious writing

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:42 am UTC
by Ginger
The Green Rider by Kristen Britain and Dragon Riders of Pern by Anne McCaffrey?

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:27 pm UTC
by Izawwlgood
Izawwlgood wrote:I just read the first book in Max Gladstones Craft sequence, and found it to be entertaining and thought provoking, if beyond campy. Gargoyles vs Vampires are silly window dressing to a pretty cool theology war.
I want to plug this series again. Female protagonistS, LGBTQ friendly, the writing quality very sharply improves after the first book, and the stories remain interesting and well paced. 5 books in the arc, and he recently put out a side story.

There's a line of campy throughout, but it gets pruned down. It also feels entirely acceptable by the time each book is wrapped up.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:12 pm UTC
by pkcommando
I just recently got a chance to read an advance copy of Christopher Moore's new book, Noir, coming out in April. If you like Moore's stuff, you'll almost certainly enjoy this one. However, he does warn you up front that many characters do display attitudes towards race/gender/sexuality that are in line with the book's setting of 1947 and that it have the potential to make you uncomfortable. Still a good mix of mystery, comedy, and Moore's zaniness.

As for fitting in with the rest of the Moore-verse:
Spoiler:
I've read it twice and can't find anything that ties it to the others, aside from it being in San Francisco. 1947 is obviously before the others, but I couldn't spot any big noticeable call-forwards.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 3:25 am UTC
by serutan
A couple more :

Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear about a multigeneration starship where things have gone very wrong and the protagonist has to figure out WTF is going on and what if anything can be done about it.

Wool by Hugh Howie. A post apocolyptic novel set in an undergound habitat where people are sheltering from the toxic environment the Earth's surface has become. Not a story to read if you're trying to cheer yourself up.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 2:41 pm UTC
by emceng
Non-fiction stuff:

I read Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics, which seemed appropriate for me. So glad I didn't buy it. Hated the writing, hated the author. It should have been a ten page pamphlet of meditation help, not 150+ pages of filler about how he likes biking and is a yuppie.

Tim Ferriss: Also not a big fan. He comes across as a jerk in his writing. He's done a great job of monetizing off his original book; good for him. Don't enjoy the details of his supplements regime or workouts. That said, I do recommend Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors. Grab a notebook when you read them, and jot down notes about the good ideas you see. Maybe just book recommendations. Either way, there's quality advice in there.

Mastery by Greene - again, don't like the writing style, but there is lots of value to be gained in the book.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 11:13 pm UTC
by Liri
This has probably popped up on a lot of people's radar, but: The Overstory. It's about trees.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:00 am UTC
by Bragrinn
Liri wrote:This has probably popped up on a lot of people's radar, but: The Overstory. It's about trees.

I like this one

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:19 am UTC
by Activator
Hi,

I love topics like that :-)

Martian already got recommend so +1 from me;-)

SF:
Hyperion
Robocalypse

Fantasy:
Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 1:22 pm UTC
by Decker
I just recently finished the "Bring Down Heaven" trilogy by Sam Sykes and it was a brilliant fantasy story. Has the feel of a DnD campaign gone off the rails.

The three books in the trilogy are
-The City Stained Red
-The Mortal Tally
-God's Last Breath
The list [of things I killed] thus far. Men, women, demons, monsters, giant serpents, giant vermin, regular vermin, regular giants, cattle, lizard, fish, lizardmen, fishmen, frogmen, Craigsmen, and a goat.
Regular goat, mind; Not a poisonous, magical goat or anything. But he was kind of an asshole

I promise,” he growled, “to kill only as many people as can reasonably be expected to help.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:15 pm UTC
by jewish_scientist
For a homework assignment I need to compare and contrast a good blag with a bad blag. The good blag is obvious, but I could not think of any bad blags. Do you have any recommendations?

P.S. $5 says you cannot say 'bad blag' 10 times fast.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 12:34 pm UTC
by doogly
jewish_scientist wrote:For a homework assignment I need to compare and contrast a good blag with a bad blag. The good blag is obvious, but I could not think of any bad blags. Do you have any recommendations?

P.S. $5 says you cannot say 'bad blag' 10 times fast.

https://motls.blogspot.com/
It is notoriously terrible among math and physics types. It is however rather technical, so that may or may not be suitable for your purposes.

Re: Recommend a book

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:02 am UTC
by JosephineTerry1
20000 Leagues Under The Sea

Maybe you missed it when you were a child, so read it now!
Amazing story!