Sacred Moments in Fiction

A slow, analog alternative to the internet

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
tzar1990
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:57 am UTC

Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby tzar1990 » Thu May 22, 2008 11:58 am UTC

I was just wondering how many of you have ever found a line, story, or even a whole book that sends shivers down your spine, and makes you feel like there's something out there. I think it must be a pretty rare feeling, but I got it a few times recently while reading the complete Chronicles of Narnia, and wanted to see if anyone else gets feelings like that in their favorite novels.

The most recent times I've got that feeling were while reading The Magician's Nephew and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. In The Magician's Nephew, I got that feeling while reading the section on the creation of Narnia, especially when Aslan speaks to the assembled creatures of Narnia for the first time. In The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, I got the feeling at the section where the characters escape from the Island of Dreams, mostly because I used to have nasty nightmares as a kid, so seeing the main characters enter into hell, and be saved through the grace of god had a big effect one me. In fact, there are times when I a version of Christianity that worshipped venerated Aslan wouldn't be too bad, if it weren't for the fact that no one would follow a religion based on a book by a recent-ish fiction writer, right?

The only other story I can remember doing this to me is the last line of Asimov's The Last Question, which just took my breath away. It took something as mundane as a (incredibly powerful super-)computer, and turned it into something... well, sacred, in a way that even I could see was amazing. Unexpected, but a perfect end to the story, and utterly, utterly beautiful.
The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper. ~Eden Phillpotts, A Shadow Passes

User avatar
Narsil
Ask me about my junk!
Posts: 2995
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:59 pm UTC
Location: Columbus.

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Narsil » Thu May 22, 2008 1:46 pm UTC

The books 2001: A Space Odyssey and Rendezvous With Rama both have a profound sort of effect on me. I love books that have sort of a humbling effect just by pointing out the vastness of space. I mean seriously, that is some big-ass shit.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

Mother Superior wrote:What's he got that I dont?
*sees Narsil's sig*
Oh... that.

User avatar
lindemherz
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:14 pm UTC
Location: Daly City, California
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby lindemherz » Thu May 22, 2008 2:34 pm UTC

Stephen Baxter's Voyage. By the moment I had finished reading the prologue, the launch of the first and only Mars mission, I was crying. Actually, many moments in that book made me cry, both because the book shows you what amazing things we could have done - and how much we would have had to sacrifice and even corrupt to achieve those amazing things. Ad astra per aspera indeed.
Physics isn't the most important thing. Love is. - Richard Feynman

User avatar
Eruantale
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:36 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Eruantale » Thu May 22, 2008 9:35 pm UTC

First, I totally agree with this. Those are the two best books in the series. What other children's books can give a person shivers?

tzar1990 wrote:
The most recent times I've got that feeling were while reading The Magician's Nephew and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. In The Magician's Nephew, I got that feeling while reading the section on the creation of Narnia, especially when Aslan speaks to the assembled creatures of Narnia for the first time. In The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, I got the feeling at the section where the characters escape from the Island of Dreams, mostly because I used to have nasty nightmares as a kid, so seeing the main characters enter into hell, and be saved through the grace of god had a big effect one me.


As for other stories:
-I have forgotten the title, but it had something to do with a dark echo... :shock: Anyway, there was a lion-mauling scene at the Imperial Games that was absolutely amazing.

-The Creation of Adam and Eve in Paradise Lost was another whoa.

-and then, if poetry counts, Sir Thomas Moore's "She Is Far From the Land", embellished perfectly by the thoughts of Washington Irving. I don't know why I like it since I am rarely even remotely interested in stories of the sort, but I do. It is a definite possibility that this is due to my weakness for poety mixed with the fact that Irving is amazing.
Last edited by Eruantale on Thu May 22, 2008 9:37 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.


http://www.yessy.com/ladycarmen

User avatar
tiny
Posts: 771
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 5:34 pm UTC
Location: Below the fifth cellar.
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby tiny » Thu May 22, 2008 11:42 pm UTC

Many moments in Susan Kay's 'Phantom'.

Bernard's helicopter flight with Lenina in Huxley's 'Brave New World'.
"I write what I see, the endless procession to the guillotine." ~ de Sade

User avatar
Clumpy
Posts: 1883
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 4:48 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Clumpy » Sun May 25, 2008 8:11 am UTC

Three moments from Orson Scott Card's Xenocide: When the Pequenino Planter dies in order to prove that his race's sentience wasn't manufactured, obsessive-compulsive Han Qing-Jao living to the end of her days believing that the gods are speaking to her through a government-engineered virus, and when Quim is killed by a zealotic forest in the pursuit of his missionary duties.

User avatar
Luthen
Posts: 2021
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 6:42 am UTC
Location: Dealing with xkcdian immigration
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Luthen » Sun May 25, 2008 11:27 am UTC

tzar1990 wrote:The only other story I can remember doing this to me is the last line of Asimov's The Last Question, which just took my breath away. It took something as mundane as a (incredibly powerful super-)computer, and turned it into something... well, sacred, in a way that even I could see was amazing. Unexpected, but a perfect end to the story, and utterly, utterly beautiful.

This is my favourite of all Asimov's works. I'm hesitant to continue because any more would ruin the ending.

Clumpy wrote:Three moments from Orson Scott Card's Xenocide: When the Pequenino Planter dies in order to prove that his race's sentience wasn't manufactured, obsessive-compulsive Han Qing-Jao living to the end of her days believing that the gods are speaking to her through a government-engineered virus, and when Quim is killed by a zealotic forest in the pursuit of his missionary duties.

Another good story, I liked his idea of the how life worked (I can't remember his name for the threads). Not really on topic though.

Will post my own moments after some thought.
My fancy new blog Image I am not a vampire! Image PM my location for a prize!*

rnew: ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOAVATAR!
*Terms + conditions changeable

User avatar
Roland Lockheart
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 9:53 pm UTC
Location: Des Moines, IA

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Roland Lockheart » Sun May 25, 2008 4:30 pm UTC

Sorry to be the first one to bring it up, but the short story The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft had profound effect on me, and every film that I have made since reading it has been at least mildly influenced by some of the concepts presented in that story.
This is one thing up with which I shall not put!
-Winston Churchill

User avatar
SkaBassist
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:42 am UTC
Location: Texas (The ass end of America)
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby SkaBassist » Tue May 27, 2008 4:02 am UTC

Oooooo.
Ishmael, by Daniel Quinn. This is my favorite book of all time, and it is just so damn good. I can re-read it over and over. If you're looking for spiritual and/or spine shivers, check it out for sure. It's just so amazing and adresses such important issues, read it for sure.

Also, if you liked "The Last Question", which is one of the greatest short stories ever written IMO, check out "The Nine Billion Names of God". It's by Arthur C. Clarke, one of the other greats of sci-fi.

User avatar
Roland Lockheart
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 9:53 pm UTC
Location: Des Moines, IA

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Roland Lockheart » Wed May 28, 2008 3:35 pm UTC

SkaBassist wrote:Oooooo.
Ishmael, by Daniel Quinn. This is my favorite book of all time, and it is just so damn good. I can re-read it over and over. If you're looking for spiritual and/or spine shivers, check it out for sure. It's just so amazing and adresses such important issues, read it for sure.

Also, if you liked "The Last Question", which is one of the greatest short stories ever written IMO, check out "The Nine Billion Names of God". It's by Arthur C. Clarke, one of the other greats of sci-fi.

Wow. My mind=blown. Then again, what else would you expect from Clarke?
This is one thing up with which I shall not put!
-Winston Churchill

User avatar
Nebuduck
Posts: 318
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:45 pm UTC
Location: Old Blighty

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Nebuduck » Wed May 28, 2008 7:05 pm UTC

Basically, all of Pullmann's "Northern Lights". I'm not sure if that's just because when I first read it I was about 10, and it has a pretty nostaligic effect on me, or if it's to do with the book being (in my opinion) bloody brilliant.

The Subtle Knife was a good yarn, but not emotional to the same degree. However, while the Amber Spyglass was nothing like so good, the end of it always gets me - I think it's just because it's the end, and stuff.

User avatar
Alioth
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:54 pm UTC
Location: Boston
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Alioth » Thu May 29, 2008 1:20 am UTC

The very very end of Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress -- "You listening, Bog? Is a computer one of Your creatures?"

User avatar
Stay_Puft_marshmallows
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 2:01 pm UTC
Location: third tube from the left, and straight on till morning

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Stay_Puft_marshmallows » Thu May 29, 2008 5:15 am UTC

tzar1990 wrote:The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The opening line of that book is pure, unalloyed win.

Sometimes the sheer authenticity of a line gives me chills. EG: Kathy Perry's last words in Old Man's War. Sometimes a character's awesomeness is so profound I will simultaneously laugh and wipe a tear from my eye- this happens for Salvor Hardin in Foundation and (I know this is lame, but...) Admirals Pellaeon and Ackbar in the Star Wars EU.

The Charge of the Light Brigade gets me, as do The Tyger and the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

As for a nastier sort of chills- He loved Big Brother!
text goes where?

ShemTealeaf
Posts: 16
Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:42 am UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby ShemTealeaf » Thu May 29, 2008 5:39 am UTC

Snow Crash (Neal Stephenson) - The opening pizza delivery sequence...my introduction to cyberpunk

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (Haruki Murakami) - The "down in a well in Mongolia" scene

Spoiler:
Wheel of Time (Robert Jordan) - Moiraine's death at the end of the fifth book


And I second the aforementioned Xenocide scenes, particularly the one with Qing-Jao

User avatar
Roland Lockheart
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 9:53 pm UTC
Location: Des Moines, IA

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Roland Lockheart » Thu May 29, 2008 5:48 am UTC

As for a nastier sort of chills- He loved Big Brother!

I threw my copy up in the air, kicked it across the room and yelled obscenities when I read that line.
This is one thing up with which I shall not put!
-Winston Churchill

User avatar
FoS
Posts: 253
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2007 2:46 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby FoS » Thu May 29, 2008 1:30 pm UTC

Return of the King.
When the Rohirrim ride out onto the Pelennor Fields all my hair stands on end.
"...working as intended"
Oomkin Druid - Sylvanas EU

Gravitas Shortfall
Posts: 110
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2007 5:43 am UTC
Location: Mountain View

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Gravitas Shortfall » Thu May 29, 2008 5:42 pm UTC

In Dune, one of the later section intros reads something like "And that day dawned when Arrakis lay at the hub of the Universe, with the wheel poised to spin." It never fails to put me in the mood for the awesomeness that is the ending of that book.
We come from people who brought us up to believe that life is a struggle. And if you should ever feel really happy, be patient. This will pass.
- Garrison Keillor -

User avatar
rockin2the70s
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 5:26 pm UTC
Location: Right where you least expect me
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby rockin2the70s » Thu May 29, 2008 10:12 pm UTC

A lot of times when I finish a truly great book (off the top of my head, LotR and Dune) I'm just in awe for a little while. I put the book down and all I can think is "Holy shit..." Same thing with a lot of series, when you have time to really submerge yourself in the world and relate with the characters, sometimes I just can't believe its over, especially with sad endings (the His Dark Materials trilogy)

Narsil wrote:I love books that have sort of a humbling effect just by pointing out the vastness of space. I mean seriously, that is some big-ass shit.


I know the feeling, and I love it too. I read a lot of sci-fi, so the vastness of space (and time) get to me a lot.
Why are we here?
Because we're here, roll the bones.
Why does it happen?
Because it happens, roll the bones.
-Rush

Heisenberg
Posts: 3789
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 8:48 pm UTC
Location: Uncertain

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Heisenberg » Fri May 30, 2008 5:55 pm UTC

FoS wrote:Return of the King.
When the Rohirrim ride out onto the Pelennor Fields all my hair stands on end.


That, AND when Eowyn yells "No living man am I! You look upon a woman.!" and kills the shit out of the Lord of the Nazgul. Gets me every time. They did an ok job recreating this in the movie, but reading it just seems so much more epic and awesome.

Edited
Last edited by Heisenberg on Tue Jun 03, 2008 6:12 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Clumpy
Posts: 1883
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 4:48 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Clumpy » Fri May 30, 2008 6:35 pm UTC

More facetiously, I seriously love the moment when Steve Dallas finally descrambles his brain back to its former "neanderthal Conservative" state near the end of Bloom County's run:

Image
"HE'S BACK!" ("He's bad.")

User avatar
Eruantale
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:36 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Eruantale » Mon Jun 02, 2008 1:46 am UTC

I would have to second and third these...

Heisenberg wrote:
FoS wrote:Return of the King.
When the Rohirrim ride out onto the Pelennor Fields all my hair stands on end.


That, AND when Eowyn yells "I am no man!" and kills the shit out of the Lord of the Nazgul. Gets me every time. They did an ok job recreating this in the movie, but reading it just seems so much more epic and awesome.
Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.


http://www.yessy.com/ladycarmen

0range
Posts: 248
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:46 am UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby 0range » Mon Jun 02, 2008 3:46 am UTC

I have this posted upon my bulletin board over my piano but I forget where it's from, maybe the Kiterunner (maybe someone can help me out). Even though I can't recall the exact scene it still makes me sigh...

"Make morning into a key and throw it into the well."
"A person who persists in believing what is not true or disbelieving what is true can waste a lifetime of effort on something that is without hope of success."

E. Jayne

User avatar
Amarantha
Posts: 1638
Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2007 4:56 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Amarantha » Mon Jun 02, 2008 3:55 am UTC

Heisenberg wrote:That, AND when Eowyn says "No living man am I! You look upon a woman."


Fix'd :)

User avatar
bennyprofane
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 5:42 pm UTC
Location: Indiana
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby bennyprofane » Sun Jun 08, 2008 5:49 pm UTC

There are quite a few of them for me.

One is the beginning of Moby Dick. The whole thing starts out with "Call me Ishmael." Now, we can't really be certain if that is even the narrator's name or not, but it does tell the entire story. If you know the story of Ahab and Ishmael from the bible, then you know the entire story of Moby Dick, and when you finish the book and realize this, it makes you wonder why you even bothered to read the entire novel, if that one line is all you need to suffice--your imagination could have done the rest.

Another is the sort of chain that Joyce makes in Finnegans Wake with the very ending sentence of the novel completing the first sentence of the novel, making the whole thing a constant, endless cycle The Wake was, to me, very inspiring anyway, almost moreso than Ulysses.

"The Last Question", by Asimov, as others have pointed out, is very poignant and beautiful. Same goes for almost all of Gravity's Rainbow, by Pynchon.

Also, the ending of Yukio Mishima's Sea of Fertility tetralogy is particularly stunning. The whole thing is a work weighted down by genius, but the ending in particular is awesome.
"The single flower contains more brightness than a hundred flowers." - Yasunari Kawabata

"Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do." - Isaac Asimov

User avatar
Narsil
Ask me about my junk!
Posts: 2995
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:59 pm UTC
Location: Columbus.

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Narsil » Sun Jun 08, 2008 7:27 pm UTC

@^:
You'd probably dig Infinite Jest as well, by Wallace. It too it a cyclical novel (well, annular at least), if a little more hamhanded in it's technique than the Wake. Then again, isn't everything? Still, it's a magnificent novel and cements the guy's firm #2 seat, second to Mr. Pynchon.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

Mother Superior wrote:What's he got that I dont?
*sees Narsil's sig*
Oh... that.

annals
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 11:24 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby annals » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:43 am UTC

What would this thread be without a phrase from religious literature?
Ecclesiastes 3:11 wrote:and he has put eternity in their hearts

Never fails to send chills down my spine.

SkaBassist wrote:Also, if you liked "The Last Question", which is one of the greatest short stories ever written IMO, check out "The Nine Billion Names of God". It's by Arthur C. Clarke, one of the other greats of sci-fi.


That story was awesome. It reminds me of this book of short stories that my dad has called...Angels and Spaceships, perhaps? It's similar in that it just walks that line between fairy tale and sci-fi.

akashra
Posts: 503
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 6:54 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, AU
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby akashra » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:58 am UTC

The scene where Smaug attacks Lake-town in "There and Back Again" ("The Hobbit") is one I always have a vivid image in my head of, for some reason. A very well written chapter/scene.

Similarly, there's the whole Tom Bombadil storyline and moral in The Lord of the Rings trilogy which was completely omitted from the movie - that despite the power of the ring, there are still some things more powerful.

You gotta also have some respect for H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" and similar.
( find / -name \*base\* -exec chown us : us { } \ ; )

User avatar
Roland Lockheart
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 9:53 pm UTC
Location: Des Moines, IA

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Roland Lockheart » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:38 pm UTC

akashra wrote:You gotta also have some respect for H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" and similar.


I talk about liking that story way to much on these forums, but since someone else mentioned it, I'll second it . :P

User avatar
Cryopyre
Posts: 701
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 4:00 am UTC
Location: A desert

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Cryopyre » Mon Jun 09, 2008 11:05 pm UTC

Every science fiction story with the first "Touch down" on a new planet.

Also, in Jack McDevitt's story, Chindi, they come upon a massive ship, and at the last unfurling of the understanding of what this massive ship does really chills you.
Felstaff wrote:I actually see what religion is to social, economical and perhaps political progress in a similar way to what war is to technological progress.

Gunfingers wrote:Voting is the power to speak your mind. You, apparently, had nothing to say.

dracharys
Posts: 130
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 12:34 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby dracharys » Tue Jun 10, 2008 2:52 am UTC

Another Asimov moment, from his short story Eyes Do More than See (the last paragraph specifically):
Spoiler:
And the eyes of the shattered head of Matter still glistened with the moisture that Brock had placed there to represent tears. The head of Matter did that which the energy-beings could do no longer and it wept for all humanity, and for the fragile beauty of the bodies they had once given up, a trillion years ago.

It seems to go against the theme of this thread in that the characters have their "something more" and lack only the mundane; but because of their separation the Matter seems to gain in value. I just thought it was a beautiful passage.
When you see the robot, drink!

User avatar
aleflamedyud
wants your cookies
Posts: 3307
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 7:50 pm UTC
Location: The Central Bureaucracy

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby aleflamedyud » Tue Jun 10, 2008 7:25 pm UTC

Let's see...

The trial of Hober Mallow in "The Merchant Princes" part of "Foundation" by Asimov.

The moment Paul Atreides wakes from the spice agony in "Dune" by Frank Herbert.

And of course, "A mountain walked or stumbled." in "Call of Cthulhu" by Howard Philip Lovecraft. Someone honestly ought to make a picture-book out of that story so I can see it all properly.
"With kindness comes naïveté. Courage becomes foolhardiness. And dedication has no reward. If you can't accept any of that, you are not fit to be a graduate student."

User avatar
Smiling Hobo
Posts: 238
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 2:55 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Smiling Hobo » Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:24 am UTC

The Golden Compass...

Spoiler:
Roger's death in The Golden Compass. He was such a nice kid, he didn't deserve to die...that entire series is pretty epic, too. I especially like the part where she meets Iorec (sp?), too.


*Nibbles on kitten*
Eat a kitten, save a cow!

User avatar
Narsil
Ask me about my junk!
Posts: 2995
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:59 pm UTC
Location: Columbus.

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Narsil » Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:58 am UTC

he- HEY!
get the hell away from that kitten! That is my job!

There can only be one grue-avatar guy, and that's me. It's like the highlander.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

Mother Superior wrote:What's he got that I dont?
*sees Narsil's sig*
Oh... that.

User avatar
Oort
Posts: 522
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 10:18 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Oort » Wed Jun 11, 2008 2:13 am UTC

Stephen King gave me a "sends shivers down your spine, and makes you feel like there's something out there" kind of feeling, but not in the same way. More like Oh me yarm a hotel will eat me sort of feeling. Especially The Man in the Black Suit, where a little boy meets the devil.

The last time I felt this was actually from a comic book. They're not just for kids, you know. Bruce Wayne gave a great speech. Sandman, Watchmen and a couple others can do this on occasion.

Flowers for Algernon, where he talks about working in the bakery.

User avatar
sporkify
Posts: 54
Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 3:23 am UTC
Location: California

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby sporkify » Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:36 am UTC

I really got the shivers in a number of places in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series. In particular, the flashbacks in The Shadow Rising were good. From a literary perspective (hey, my brain is stuck around finals time) these passages played to the author's strongest point-his ability to write points of view. You really empathize with the characters here...
Gorram frakking woolhead!

User avatar
Midnight
Posts: 2170
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 3:53 am UTC
Location: Twixt hither and thither. Ergo, Jupiter.

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby Midnight » Thu Jun 12, 2008 4:31 am UTC

i uhh

Well the end of Flowers for Algernon, speaking of it, prettttttty much made me cry. Which books don't do. So yeah. "

And in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time, while people are talking about it--Moridin's chess-like-game-thing. With the Fisher or whatever. It's a bit heavy handed in the symbolism, but I'm ok with it. It's more than he used before, so it worked. Shivery for sure.

I like the ending of Snow Crash. With the advertisement. I read that like four times over and over again and then showed it to my friends and they were all like "O_O wut." Yeah. Crazy. Mmm-hmm. I should stop typing. Yeahhhh.
uhhhh fuck.

ducknerd
Posts: 211
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:18 pm UTC
Location: Alaska. No, seriously.
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby ducknerd » Thu Jun 12, 2008 4:56 am UTC

The ending of Dabchick, even though I don't understand it. That's the beauty of Murakami for me, though: that mysterious feeling that you don't understand what the fuck he's trying to say, but at the same time you have the feeling of completion and contentment when everything in a story comes together. I bet those stories would be great study material for a writing class.

The last sentence of Kurt Vonnegut's Hocus Pocus: "Just because some of us can read and write and do a little math, that doesn't mean we deserve to conquer the Universe." Brought the whole book together, depressing as it was.
17/Male/Hetero/Euromutt

User avatar
bbctol
Super Deluxe Forum Title of DESTINYâ„¢
Posts: 3137
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:27 pm UTC
Location: The Twilight Zone
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby bbctol » Thu Jun 12, 2008 4:04 pm UTC

An awful lot of A Wrinkle in Time was pretty damn mind-shattering for foolish ten-year-old me who thought it was a children's book.

annals
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 11:24 pm UTC

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby annals » Thu Jun 12, 2008 8:26 pm UTC

bbctol wrote:An awful lot of A Wrinkle in Time was pretty damn mind-shattering for foolish ten-year-old me who thought it was a children's book.


The part where

Spoiler:
Meg realizes that the only thing she has that can save her brother is unconditional love?

Hell Yes I say. I remember, the first time I read the book, walking down to that town and agonizing over the solution with her, and the moment of eucatastrophe when she and I figured it out...best thing ever.

User avatar
fusillade2
Posts: 76
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:17 pm UTC
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Re: Sacred Moments in Fiction

Postby fusillade2 » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:13 am UTC

As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.

.

.

.

:shock:


Return to “Books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests