Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Adacore » Tue Jun 08, 2010 2:41 pm UTC

Most of the sci-fi I read has female characters, frequently in the majority, and certainly always present and not just there to look pretty. The most recent hard sci-fi I read, some of Alastair Reynolds' stuff has a lot of strong female characters - for example, two of the three main protagonists of Pushing Ice were female. And from what I can recall it doesn't dwell on sexism or gender issues much if at all. Iain Banks, is similar (unless he's making a point).

Not hard sci-fi, but Elizabeth Moon's sci-fi stuff pretty much universally features strong female protagonists (and features swords, and horses, she does like her horses), although it certainly verges into actively featuring sexism as 'bad thing that must be opposed'. Peter F Hamilton started off pretty misogynist, but is getting a lot better. He does tend to feature a large number of beautiful, extremely intelligent and promiscuous young women (I get the feeling he likes writing his ideal woman into his books), but aside from that it's generally ok.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Rogles » Thu Jun 17, 2010 3:07 am UTC

Charles Stross's books are some of the hardest SF out there, and they contain a good number of female protagonists that are just as capable as the males around them, if not more.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby TheSkyMovesSideways » Fri Jun 18, 2010 8:07 am UTC

shieldforyoureyes wrote:Most Soviet sci-fi.

The Lukyanenko I've read must have been a pretty far outlying exception then! :shock:

Mo0man wrote:Actually in that case, wouldn't Starship Troopers(the novel) also be mostly nonsexist?

Uhh, probably not, given that it's about an elite military unit that doesn't admit women.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Jorpho » Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:00 pm UTC

Non-sexist is not an adjective I could ever possibly conceive being applied to anything by Heinlein.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Sat Jun 19, 2010 3:50 am UTC

TheSkyMovesSideways wrote:Uhh, probably not, given that it's about an elite military unit that doesn't admit women.


But it's explained that women aren't accepted because of basic biological restrictions, though they make absolutely the best pilots.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby A.DTheMediocre » Mon Jun 21, 2010 1:41 pm UTC

I'd recommend Iain M. Banks and Ken MacLeod, unless you're the type of chap who uses the phrase "pinko" without irony, in which case they'll probably just annoy you.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby WaterToFire » Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:35 pm UTC

A.DTheMediocre wrote:I'd recommend Iain M. Banks and Ken MacLeod, unless you're the type of chap who uses the phrase "pinko" without irony, in which case they'll probably just annoy you.

I'll second Ken MacLeod.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby bigglesworth » Tue Jun 22, 2010 7:00 pm UTC

And I'll third him.

It's also not for people who are offended by Philip Pullman.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby orinjuse » Wed Jun 23, 2010 10:17 am UTC

bigglesworth wrote:It's also not for people who are offended by Philip Pullman.


Good call. Although I wouldn't probably call him hard scifi.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby bigglesworth » Wed Jun 23, 2010 10:28 am UTC

No, that example was just chosen just to avoid spoilers.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby melladh » Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:11 pm UTC

I can't say I'm sure what counts as sexist, because I have no real concept of gender when I'm dealing with personalities unless the gender issue is exaggerated (and even then I rarely care) but personally I quite adore Rendez-Vous With Rama. I'm not sure if this counts as "hard" sci-fi, but it's definitely in pure form. Sure the MAIN main character is male, and a lot of the others probably are, but I imagine authors often write characters they feel at home with, and I don't really care if they happen to be male or female. I'll take on either gender and call it my own. ;) There isn't really any major talk about politics except "we are what our surroundings make us into". Mainly it's just a beautiful exploration.

That's just my extremely uneducated point of view. I don't read much sci-fi. Rama is a really old book. But it's still one of my favorites.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Mother Superior » Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:13 pm UTC

Kendo_Bunny wrote:
TheSkyMovesSideways wrote:Uhh, probably not, given that it's about an elite military unit that doesn't admit women.


But it's explained that women aren't accepted because of basic biological restrictions, though they make absolutely the best pilots.

Yeah, but every time a female character appears, she appears solely to be stared at or taken out on a date. Or to be rescued, I think- been a while since I read it. Except for the female captain.

Ermm... this is actually what I wrote my bachelor's essay on, sort of, and I'm a bit surprised that Asimov got such a bad wrap. I mean yes, the Foundation-books aren't a particularly great example, and let's face it, the characters in those books are so two-dimensional you get paper cuts, but I'd like to point a finger at I, Robot as a pretty good example. Susan Calvin is neither disrespected because she's a woman, her competence is never questioned and she is, by far, the person in the world who understands robots the best. However, and this is what I found particularly interesting, Susan never has any maternal feelings for the robots, like one might expect (you know, the "Oh, I care about the robots, I see them as people, that's why I understand them better than you cold men"-schtick). In... shit, what's it called? Little Lost Robots, upon hearing that one out of 63 robots has gone wonky and might be dangerous, Susan's first advice is: "Scrap 'em all. Get new ones. It'll be easier." They're just tools to her. Now, so long as no-one points out that one chapter where Asimov made her fall in love and consequently go all girly and devalued her because she was bad at applying makeup, I think that stands as a solid example of non-sexist hard sci-fi.

I'd also say Clarke's space odyssey, or specifically 2010 and Rama. I am also a bit puzzled why the previous poster wouldn't call Rendezvous With Rama hard Sci-fi. If that book isn't hard SF, what the hell is?

I also examined Stranger in a Strange Land... let's move on.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Apteryx » Tue Aug 03, 2010 12:07 am UTC

Mother Superior wrote:
Kendo_Bunny wrote:
TheSkyMovesSideways wrote: Now, so long as no-one points out that one chapter where Asimov made her fall in love and consequently go all girly and devalued her because she was bad at applying makeup, I think that stands as a solid example of non-sexist hard sci-fi.


Sorry to pick out a fault in the face of the rest of the post being interesting, but it is very pertinent to the over whelming attitude feminists have.

What you are really saying there, is you think Calvins depiction is not sexist right up until the author shows her to have a human fault, to not actually be admirable and perfect in every way. If it had been a male character, who was a top scientist and pragmatic and all the virtues but, falling in love, he got stupid over his haircut, and wardrobe and other characters "devalued" him for it ( and other men AND other women would at least laugh at a middle aged man becoming a fool-for-love, it is funny to see when anyone does it ), YOU WOULD NOT BLINK AN EYE.

It would just be a natural progression or choice of the author and you might say "Well, that seems a little far fetched, he is competent in all else . . . oh well, was just a choice of the author" .

However, when some dastardly MALE writer does exactly the same thing to a female character OH DEAR OH DEAR . . . all the evils in the world are attributed to his intent, by you and all the other bigoted female readers.
Every choice any male makes, you claim part of some conspiracy . . . you know, except when the male has chosen to portray a female in some other way, a way you approve of.

Because people are diverse, and have strengths and weaknesses, it is just as likely Calvin should act that way on falling in love, as it would be for her to say, become calm and successfully plan out a loving campaign. But of course, only making her out to be wonderful and faultless isn't sexist.

:rolleyes:
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby The EGE » Tue Aug 03, 2010 2:29 am UTC

melladh wrote:I can't say I'm sure what counts as sexist, because I have no real concept of gender when I'm dealing with personalities unless the gender issue is exaggerated (and even then I rarely care) but personally I quite adore Rendez-Vous With Rama. I'm not sure if this counts as "hard" sci-fi, but it's definitely in pure form. Sure the MAIN main character is male, and a lot of the others probably are, but I imagine authors often write characters they feel at home with, and I don't really care if they happen to be male or female. I'll take on either gender and call it my own. ;) There isn't really any major talk about politics except "we are what our surroundings make us into". Mainly it's just a beautiful exploration.

That's just my extremely uneducated point of view. I don't read much sci-fi. Rama is a really old book. But it's still one of my favorites.


Clarke is pretty good on that, yes. 2010 and the entire Rama series are pretty non-sexist IIRC.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Mother Superior » Tue Aug 03, 2010 7:50 am UTC

Apteryx wrote:
Mother Superior wrote:
Kendo_Bunny wrote:
TheSkyMovesSideways wrote: Now, so long as no-one points out that one chapter where Asimov made her fall in love and consequently go all girly and devalued her because she was bad at applying makeup, I think that stands as a solid example of non-sexist hard sci-fi.


Sorry to pick out a fault in the face of the rest of the post being interesting, but it is very pertinent to the over whelming attitude feminists have.

What you are really saying there, is you think Calvins depiction is not sexist right up until the author shows her to have a human fault, to not actually be admirable and perfect in every way. If it had been a male character, who was a top scientist and pragmatic and all the virtues but, falling in love, he got stupid over his haircut, and wardrobe and other characters "devalued" him for it ( and other men AND other women would at least laugh at a middle aged man becoming a fool-for-love, it is funny to see when anyone does it ), YOU WOULD NOT BLINK AN EYE.

She's shown to have plenty of faults- primarily not liking humans or being very good at interacting with humans, in fact she is extremely rude to the reporter who interviews her on several occasions, it's just that in that chapter, Asimov depicts her as being a stereotypical woman. Emotionally unstable to the point of driving a robot insane as punishment for hurting her feelings. The robot reveals three people's inner desires: The two men want career advancement, Susan wants to get nasty with the young lab assistant, even though she admits that she is much too old and not good looking enough. I like character flaws, and Susan's got them- in fact, she's not really all that likeable, if not exactly unlikeable, but in that chapter it just seems very off.

THank you for finding the rest of my post interesting, by the way. :)
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby melladh » Tue Aug 03, 2010 9:57 am UTC

Mother Superior wrote:I am also a bit puzzled why the previous poster wouldn't call Rendezvous With Rama hard Sci-fi. If that book isn't hard SF, what the hell is?


Hehe I could have put that more clearly I guess - what I meant was just that since I'm not a sci-fi reader I wouldn't know what sci-fi readers constitute as "hard" sci-fi. Personally, with my own terminology, I call it "pure" sci-fi, as it's exactly what it says on the tin. "Hard" could refer to harsh, action-filled, what have you, and there's a lot of more sci-fi that I personally wouldn't consider particularly pure - there's so much that's just your average action sequence but in space, that therefor is referred to as sci-fi. It's an extremely broad genre.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby existential_elevator » Tue Aug 03, 2010 4:47 pm UTC

jestingrabbit wrote:
minehowe wrote:Have you tried Iain M Banks?

I was about to suggest him. He often puts women at the centre of stories. I'm not sure that his stuff passes the bechdel test, but his women are given a fair amount of depth.
I was also about to suggest Iain M Banks. He actually does some quite interesting things with gender: in the Culture, gender is entirely fluid, and it's a fairly straightforward [if lengthy] biological process for someone to switch between being a woman and being a man. Consequently, you will get male characters talking about their time as a female, and vice-versa. It means that really, even if the protagonist is male, it's likely that they won't be completely divorced from femininity. I think he's a pretty decent person for writing female characters, too. Certainly, he's good at writing complex characters.

If you're looking for something entirely genderless, I'd recommend Olaf Stapledon. He definitely does hard sci-fi, but it really is from a global perspective, set over thousands of years. Something completely different, really. It's been a while since I've read his stuff, so I'm not sure if I'd want to sell it to you as having strong female characters, but it definitely has the kind of perspective that makes it "non-sexist" by most acceptable definitions.

If you can get hold of it, I also recommend Memoirs of a Spacewoman, by Naomi Mitcheson. Again, this is more world-building sci-fi, but it definitely has a balanced treatment of genders.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Apteryx » Tue Aug 03, 2010 10:55 pm UTC

Mother Superior wrote:
She's shown to have plenty of faults- primarily not liking humans


Looked at from the idea of "Our ways ought to be utile, conform to the universe", that wasn't a fault though, surely.

Nasty self serving wretches, mostly, humans.

:tongue:

My point was more a lament that, faults depicted in male characters are taken as just that. But faults depicted in female characters are at best damned as stereotypes, if not out-right claimed as misogyny. But, you know, women are not without fault ( haha , I know that is fuel enough for you to all burn me at the stake, but you have to catch me first ) and so female characters basically have to have faults.

No one would ever think of saying "Oh, THAT male character has a fault, . . . MISANDRY !" ( OH WOW, Bill Gates really really needs spelling lessons ! )
Mother Superior wrote:THank you for finding the rest of my post interesting, by the way. :)


Well it was, so, no worries, you are quite welcome.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Mother Superior » Tue Aug 03, 2010 11:30 pm UTC

Apteryx wrote:My point was more a lament that, faults depicted in male characters are taken as just that. But faults depicted in female characters are at best damned as stereotypes, if not out-right claimed as misogyny. But, you know, women are not without fault ( haha , I know that is fuel enough for you to all burn me at the stake, but you have to catch me first ) and so female characters basically have to have faults.

No one would ever think of saying "Oh, THAT male character has a fault, . . . MISANDRY !" ( OH WOW, Bill Gates really really needs spelling lessons ! )


Well, yeah, actually some people would depending on which flaw it was. Even if what you say was true, that still wouldn't negate the fact that Susan Calvin is primarily depicted as cold, detached, rational and extremely competent at her job, or the quinessential 50s SF-scientist, except in the one chapter where her womanhood is even raised as an issue, where she becomes a spiteful, emotionally immature person who destroys the sanity of an already tortured robot just for doing what it was programmed to do, only causing her and others harm through good intentions, all because she couldn't get the young hunk she wanted because she in, her own words, was too old and too ugly. Am I really crazy for reading something sexist into that?
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby poxic » Wed Aug 04, 2010 1:02 am UTC

No. It's about as appealing as a chapter where a normally cool, calculating gay male scientist goes batshit drama queen and starts mincing around the room. Or where a normally warm, caring straight male scientist suddenly starts acting like a malechauvinistpig crossed with RamboTerminatorGuyFrom300.

If the stereotypes weren't there and this was simply a character in breakdown mode, that would be interesting. Since that stereotype is there, and is basically only ever applied to women, yeah, it's wtf.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Apteryx » Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:44 am UTC

poxic wrote:
If the stereotypes weren't there and this was simply a character in breakdown mode, that would be interesting. Since that stereotype is there, and is basically only ever applied to women, yeah, it's wtf.


Well, if that were even remotely true you might have a point. But frequently fictions have the exact same stereotype against men in them. And you know it. There is even a term for it, and there isn't one for the female equivalent that I know of.


Mid Life Crisis anyone?. Sure, you can claim it strikes both sexes, and it probably does in real life, amybe even equal numbers, we are all human after all.. But it uniquely used as a stereotype against men in literature, and they are roundly condemned and ridiculed for it on page, stage and screen.

but , you know, only woman can suffer stereotypes . . .

In the eyes of bigots , yeah, that is true.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Apteryx » Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:56 am UTC

Mother Superior wrote:
Well, yeah, actually some people would depending on which flaw it was. Even if what you say was true, that still wouldn't negate the fact that Susan Calvin is primarily depicted as cold, detached, rational and extremely competent at her job, or the quinessential 50s SF-scientist, except in the one chapter where her womanhood is even raised as an issue, where she becomes a spiteful, emotionally immature person who destroys the sanity of an already tortured robot just for doing what it was programmed to do, only causing her and others harm through good intentions, all because she couldn't get the young hunk she wanted because she in, her own words, was too old and too ugly. Am I really crazy for reading something sexist into that?


Not crazy bad crazy, but maybe overly sensitive crazy. She was, compared to the social ideal even SHE saw, at least too old for the bloke. Just as a male in the exact same situation would have been I think, but then I can't remember the exact age difference. The spiteful immature thing, well it is human, people do crazy things when their emotions are involved, maybe any overly controlled character male or female might understandably "do wrong" under like stress?.

The thing is, authors HAVE to be able to depict characters doing things we know people are capable of. Just because they are girls, can't mean they can never do wrong for fear of "negative stereotype".

True non sexist judgement might go "Well, it is quite likely a human will do vile things, thwarted in love and sensing they have lost the race due to age/looks/practice".

Would you have doubted the likelihood of ANY particular cruelty by a male Calvin ( old ugly and non-practised at loves arts ) to a female love interest that spurned them?. No, of course not, life is full, hatefully full, of examples of same. Well, look around you with your eyes open, so to it is of thwarted spinsters harming those they can reach, it is the same impulse, in virtually the same breast. Humans are equally capable of vile or noble acts.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Mother Superior » Wed Aug 04, 2010 7:36 am UTC

Apteryx wrote:but , you know, only woman can suffer stereotypes . . .

In the eyes of bigots , yeah, that is true.


Well, no. This is about two pictures of Susan Calvin: One in which she does not fulfill many if any standards of heteronormativity for female literary characters, and one in which she fulfills many of the most negatively associated standards: Emotional and soft, self-effacing where the male characters are competitive, and vulnerable. The same could be said for the men, as it is only in that chapter that there is suddenly an issue of career advancement and who is going to be in charge of that division at US Robotics, and competetiveness is among the masculine stereotypes, but seeing as how the book was written in the 50s, when one certainly couldn't go to the "Women have it fine now"-defense, and especially imo, because this is a work of science fiction, a genre that is supposed to deal with changes in human responses based on advancement in science, technology or societal standards, it is especially important to point the female ones out.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Apteryx » Wed Aug 04, 2010 11:04 pm UTC

" Emotional and soft, self-effacing where the male characters are competitive, and vulnerable."

You are right about them being stereotypes.(Everything ever written about how humans are IS a stereotype, of course some more accurate than others.). You are right about them being at odds with the other ways she is depicted. You are also right that the men are depicted in stereotype ways.
You are absolutely right that SCI FI ought, of all genres, to do better at laying out our hopes of a better world than other genres.

You are ABSOLUTELY wrong to imply that that means contradictory characters like hers should be vorbotten or even that they ought to be looked down on. Unless you also are saying that ALL characters in Sci Fi have to be prefect avatars of equity. No sexists, no weaklings that don't stand up for themselves, no victims, no victimisers . . .
Or even ( sexist-ly ) all the FEMALE characters, for-ever-more AND retroactively, have to be prefect. Her character is contradictory. So is yours mind you, and mine. Some people have faults like hers. Some people are perfectly capable in all aspects of their lives, but ought not be allowed into a singles bar without a keeper. Or are haters. Or are self destructive. and on and on.

My point is you say you are pointing out a stereotype, and then go on to imply the way of correcting it is to replace it with a POSITIVE stereotype, as if that were anything other than perfect Orwellian doublethink.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Mother Superior » Thu Aug 05, 2010 6:54 am UTC

I'm sorry, wasn't this thread about non-sexist sci-fi? Sci-fi without negative female stereotypes? And isn't therefore pretty fuckin' relevant to bring up the one instance in this book where Asimov resorted to female clichés and stereotypes?

My point is you say you are pointing out a stereotype, and then go on to imply the way of correcting it is to replace it with a POSITIVE stereotype, as if that were anything other than perfect Orwellian doublethink.


No I'm not, because when rationality and competetiveness and so on is applied to a female character it strengthens them, not weakens them, and they're not stereotypes anymore. Women being rational is not a stereotype. Besides, we are talking about all of this from a non-sexist point of view. This thread is about finding non-sexist science fiction, and apart from that one chapter, I, Robot qualifies, but that one chapter brings up a lot of problems.

You are ABSOLUTELY wrong to imply that that means contradictory characters like hers should be vorbotten or even that they ought to be looked down on. Unless you also are saying that ALL characters in Sci Fi have to be prefect avatars of equity. No sexists, no weaklings that don't stand up for themselves, no victims, no victimisers . . .


Well actually I do think that contradictory characters LIKE THAT (because I could feel you start typing already) should be verboten (don't bring the german unless you know what you're doing) because I don't think that makes them very interesting. Contradictory characters usually live different than they preach, not live different than they live, which is what Susan does. And again- POINT OF THREAD: TO FIND NON-SEXIST SCIENCE FICTION! I like Stranger in a Strange Land, I think it's a great gem in classic Sci-fi. Jubal Harshaw is a fantastically fun character- but he keeps a fuckin' harem, and the 'free love' in the book seems suspiciously slanted towards heteronormativity, and women always being available for men. I quite enjoyed the Foundation books, even though the only female character I can remember seemed to spend most of her time crying over... something, I dunno. However, I would usually not bring up these books in this thread because they aren't very good examples of non-sexist science fiction.
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Belial » Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:00 pm UTC

Adacore wrote:Most of the sci-fi I read has female characters, frequently in the majority, and certainly always present and not just there to look pretty. The most recent hard sci-fi I read, some of Alastair Reynolds' stuff has a lot of strong female characters - for example, two of the three main protagonists of Pushing Ice were female.


And the only two really constant characters in the Revelation Space trilogy (the "main characters" largely changed over the three books, except for two) were female and basically ridiculously badass and not overly sexualized. It was a pretty good thing. I'm not ready to really call the books entirely non-sexist, but they beat out most of the hard sci-fi I've read.

And from what I can recall it doesn't dwell on sexism or gender issues much if at all,


That's not necessarily a positive, but it definitely beats dwelling on them wrong.
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Adacore
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Adacore » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:27 pm UTC

I'd forgotten that Iain Banks' Culture stuff had the gender-changing concept. I guess that makes it more relevant than I originally thought, although as I mentioned, it's normally used as a mechanism to make a point about how the inequality today (or in other far-future scifi cultures) is undesirable.

Belial wrote:
Adacore wrote:And from what I can recall it doesn't dwell on sexism or gender issues much if at all,

That's not necessarily a positive, but it definitely beats dwelling on them wrong.

I agree it's not necessarily a positive, but it was what I understood the OP to be asking about.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Phasma Felis » Wed Oct 13, 2010 12:18 am UTC

Kendo_Bunny wrote:
TheSkyMovesSideways wrote:Uhh, probably not, given that it's about an elite military unit that doesn't admit women.


But it's explained that women aren't accepted because of basic biological restrictions, though they make absolutely the best pilots.

That kinda sorta makes sense in a world where the infantry need upper body strength to lug their gear around, but loses a lot of steam when everyone has super-strong body armor. And of course the "Feminine Issues" thing is already easy to put off with basic birth control treatments. (Whether female soldiers should be required to do that is another kettle of fish, of course.)

Heinlein...well, he was pretty outspoken in the belief that women have as much to contribute as men and are capable of doing anything a man can do, which does put him ahead of some of his contemporaries. But at the same time, he had ideas about what women "want" that are problematic. No matter how accomplished and badass his girls are, they always hope to eventually retire and become '50s housewives. I love his books, and he's far from the worst kind of sexist, but he's definitely sexist.

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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby serutan » Fri Oct 15, 2010 3:57 am UTC

Phasma Felis wrote:
Heinlein...well, he was pretty outspoken in the belief that women have as much to contribute as men and are capable of doing anything a man can do, which does put him ahead of some of his contemporaries. But at the same time, he had ideas about what women "want" that are problematic. No matter how accomplished and badass his girls are, they always hope to eventually retire and become '50s housewives. I love his books, and he's far from the worst kind of sexist, but he's definitely sexist.


Throw in that he has also said that women are superior to men, and that they are therefore shafting themselves by demanding equality (from Expanded Universe), and I gave up trying to figure out what all those statements added up to in terms of sexism (or lack thereof).
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Re: Non-sexist hard scifi: does it exist?

Postby Plasma Man » Wed Oct 27, 2010 1:17 pm UTC

How about Time's Eye? It's not the hardest science fiction, but it's certainly not soft, and the protagonist, Bisesa, is definitely a strong character.
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