Book you are proudest to have finished...

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the Cow
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Postby the Cow » Fri Jul 27, 2007 7:47 pm UTC

thefiddler wrote:Or... well... Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Very long, very boring, yet still appealing to the part of me that loves medieval, Arthurian legends. :)


Agreed. But without the appeal.
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Postby zomgmouse » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:50 am UTC

refreshingapathy wrote:The Canterbury Tales was the nastiest thing I ever read. Because it was a very, very rough translation (if that at all).


Why not read it in the original? I mean, we had to read part of the General Prologue in the original. It's not too hard, once you get used to it. It also helps with the Shakespeare.
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Postby Fluff » Sun Jul 29, 2007 4:38 pm UTC

The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Vol 1 - 3.

8)

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Postby Ghona » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:12 pm UTC

SilverWolfe wrote:
Pathway wrote:Tolkien did write in a very high style--it's not for everyone.

It wasn't his "high style" that bothered me, it's that I'm a skimmer by nature and when you spend three pages describing the same tree*, I find that I've skipped on ahead without reading a word.


But it was a really big tree.
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Postby Twasbrillig » Mon Jul 30, 2007 5:32 am UTC

With One Lousy Free Packet of Seed by Lynne Truss. I know, I know, I've been touting its merits in every single thread in these here fora, but it's really hard to get through. The end of it is worth the entire book, several times over - it's amazing.
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Postby BiancaBlack » Mon Jul 30, 2007 12:07 pm UTC

thefiddler wrote:
BiancaBlack wrote:"Crime and Punishment"

Dostoevsky? How can you not like Dostoevsky? O.O


Well, mostly it's just the fact that I find it utterly boring.

I know it's supposed to be great literature and all but, sorry, all I get from reading Crime and Punishment is a strong desire to throw the book out the window and go climb trees instead.
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Postby Invisible_Insane » Mon Jul 30, 2007 6:57 pm UTC

thefiddler wrote:
BiancaBlack wrote:"Crime and Punishment"

Dostoevsky? How can you not like Dostoevsky? O.O
I have a love-hate relationship with Dostoevsky. I started reading 'The Possessed' at the beginning of the summer, got 100 pages in, and the hit the wall and I haven't been able to pick it up since. But Crime and Punishment is fantastic.

The book I'm proudest of having finished is probably Anna Karenina. I have no idea why I decided to finish. 950-something pages of:

'He loves me." "He loves me not." "He loves me?" "He loves me not?!"
Spoilers/Most Satisfying Part of The Book wrote:Anna throws herself in front of a train!


Never again.
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Postby BlueNowhere » Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:31 pm UTC

I'll just have to add 1984. I have been meaning to read that for several summers now. I finished it just a couple of weeks ago.

With all the references that people have been making to it, I didn't want to feel left out.

That's all.

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Postby liza » Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:54 pm UTC

BiancaBlack wrote:"Crime and Punishment" *shudders*

In my opinion it's about 600 (out of 750) pages too long. The so called "cliff hangers" at the end of each chapter (If that was enough to make you want to read the next chapter, you were never gonna be too hard to convince, were you?), the annoyingly perfect Sonia (Probably the least believeable fictional character I've ever had the misfortune of coming across*), the completely anticlimactic ending (I mean, what the heck was that all about?!)...

Uhm, sorry about the rant, dunno where that came from.

*A friend had a theory that Sonia, being so perfect, probably had never even passed gas (it would have been completely OOC), and that the book would therefore end with her exploding (which would no doubt have made it much more memorable)


*Gasp!* I loved that book. Well, it was a love-hate relationship. There were certainly moments I wanted to stop reading, but I'm glad I finished. Sure, the ending was anticlimactic, but what else could it have been?

Castaway wrote:I once read 100 pages of the grapes of wrath in an afternoon and felt like killing myself. I hated that book more than anything ever. I was going to fuck up my english grade if I didn't read it though.

Really? I loved that book with a passion. Perhaps the obligation had something to do with your hatred? Oh, except for the ending. I didn't like the ending. I saw the (blatant) metaphor and everything, but it was way, way too creepy for my taste (I think you'll know what I'm referring to?).

kcr wrote:The unabridged Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (who else?)
It took me a while, longer than it does for me to read most things, but I absolutely loved it. Definitely worth reading.

Kudos. That book's been staring me down from my bookshelf for ages, but I've yet to pick it up. So you agree that it's really good? I know it's a classic, but if I get through a book that long and don't like it. I'll be severely disappointed. Like gmalivuk said, life's too short to be reading bad books.

Invisible_Insane wrote:The book I'm proudest of having finished is probably Anna Karenina. I have no idea why I decided to finish. 950-something pages of:

'He loves me." "He loves me not." "He loves me?" "He loves me not?!"
Spoilers/Most Satisfying Part of The Book wrote:Anna throws herself in front of a train!


Never again.

Agh! Blasphemy! I loved that book. The only reason I can say I'm proud of finishing is because others expect me to be proud of it. I devoured its 950 pages in less than two weeks. ...Though even with my love for the book, I agree with your 'most satisfying part', though probably not for the same reasons.

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Postby I Zimbra » Sun Aug 05, 2007 9:10 pm UTC

I read Infinite Jest TWICE!

Feynman's Six Not So Easy Pieces. I'm not saying I understood it, but I read it.

The Iliad and The Odyssey. Spoiler Alert: The Iliad sucks.

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Postby bonder » Wed Aug 08, 2007 6:17 am UTC

kcr wrote:The unabridged Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (who else?)
It took me a while, longer than it does for me to read most things, but I absolutely loved it. Definitely worth reading.


I agree. This one is probably my favourite book (certainly in my top 3). I think the main reason I'm so proud of having finished it is that I know so many people who have started reading it and then have not finished it. I'm the only person I know in meatspace who has finished this book. I really want to read it in the original french someday, that would be awesome.

edit:
I Zimbra wrote:The Iliad and The Odyssey. Spoiler Alert: The Iliad sucks.

I disagree. What translation did you read? I read Lattimore's translation and thought it was pretty awesome; granted, I did skip the Catalogue of the Ships, so I guess I can say everything else was awesome.
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Postby I Zimbra » Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:23 am UTC

bonder wrote:
I Zimbra wrote:The Iliad and The Odyssey. Spoiler Alert: The Iliad sucks.

I disagree. What translation did you read? I read Lattimore's translation and thought it was pretty awesome; granted, I did skip the Catalogue of the Ships, so I guess I can say everything else was awesome.


I read Robert Fagles' translation for both of them. I respect the Iliad as a work of literature, but reading about what are supposed to be the best examples of humanity (for the time) destroying each other for ultimately foolish reasons really put me off. I know it's supposed to be about man's hubris and such (and really, what Greek stories aren't?) but I couldn't get into it. I skipped the catalogue of ships, as well.

The Odyssey, on the other hand, was pure gold.

quick edit: I think Fagles' translations are really good. He manages to maintain the feel of an oral epic, without coming off as antiquated. There are some modern colloqualisms that are out of place, but overall they were excellent.
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Postby notyouravgjoel » Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:59 pm UTC

refreshingapathy wrote:The Canterbury Tales was the nastiest thing I ever read. Because it was a very, very rough translation (if that at all). Didn't have a problem with War and Peace like most people.

And although it's not insanely long, I am proud to say I understood A Clockwork Orange pretty quickly.


Ugh. I unwittingly bought a translation in which the author tried to make everything rhyme. I absolutely could not stand reading it, and so I threw it out. Later, I bought another one at a thrift store and loved it.


The Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes is my biggest accomplishment. That is a beast of a book. Hobbes' thoughts on society and government helped to change my outlook on philosophy.

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Postby dnel » Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:42 pm UTC

For me my greatest reading challenge so far would be Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance which is both long and deals with some complex topics which gets you thinking as well. At the time though I was just getting back into a reading habit so these days it probably wouldn't be so much of a challenge, I might even pick it up again and see where it takes me :)

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Postby bbctol » Thu Aug 09, 2007 1:07 pm UTC

Cryptonomicon was long, but an easy read.
The Grapes of Wrath was actually quite gripping.
A Clockwork Orange was fairly easy to understand.

Funny, I can't remember any books that have actually been hard to finish.

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Postby bookishbunny » Thu Aug 09, 2007 2:57 pm UTC

War and Peace, because it was a goal.

It was worth it, but not the "greatest novel evah!!!". I wrote more about it on another forum. I'll see if I can dig it up.
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Postby Gofyr » Fri Aug 10, 2007 6:51 pm UTC

Children Of Hurin - Tolkien

It took me many tries to get through, it just seems to trudge on with a... 'detatched' feel to the narration, everything seems apathetic and passive, makes for very slow reading -__-

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Postby notyouravgjoel » Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:00 pm UTC

Gofyr wrote:Children Of Hurin - Tolkien

It took me many tries to get through, it just seems to trudge on with a... 'detatched' feel to the narration, everything seems apathetic and passive, makes for very slow reading -__-


How was it? I still need to read it.


I couldn't stand the first book of lost tales.

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Postby Gofyr » Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:07 pm UTC

notyouravgjoel wrote:
Gofyr wrote:Children Of Hurin - Tolkien

It took me many tries to get through, it just seems to trudge on with a... 'detatched' feel to the narration, everything seems apathetic and passive, makes for very slow reading -__-


How was it? I still need to read it.


I couldn't stand the first book of lost tales.


Story in itself isn't so bad, and kept me reading. Not sure if that was due to me refusing to stop reading a book I'd paid good money for or not...

Has some fairly adult themes in it, but you need to really stay awake with characters being introduced and who's who.

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Postby dagron » Sat Aug 11, 2007 8:21 pm UTC

BiancaBlack wrote:
thefiddler wrote:
BiancaBlack wrote:"Crime and Punishment"

Dostoevsky? How can you not like Dostoevsky? O.O


Well, mostly it's just the fact that I find it utterly boring.

I know it's supposed to be great literature and all but, sorry, all I get from reading Crime and Punishment is a strong desire to throw the book out the window and go climb trees instead.

I'm not much for classic lit, but I liked Crime and Punishment.

However, Brothers Karamazov was awful.

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Postby Martin » Sat Aug 11, 2007 11:13 pm UTC

It's a cointoss between the 3 volume Knuth set ( http://www.amazon.com/dp/0201485419 )
and Agrippa ( http://www.amazon.com/dp/0875428320 ).

Eventually I hope to work on http://www.amazon.com/dp/9004094210
But that'll be long after I've groked Wheelock's Latin ( http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060783710 ), and have $300 to spend on a book :shock:.

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Postby burserk » Fri Sep 07, 2007 5:11 am UTC

Rabbit Angstrom by John Updike.
for me it was a long read by enjoyable one

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Postby iknoritesrsly » Fri Sep 07, 2007 8:59 am UTC

the city of god against the pagans.


wait, waaaaaaiiit. i never did finish that one.
but if i ever did, i would be proud.

edit: ohh, and since he's been mentioned, bumpity bump bump for dostoevsky.
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Postby bookishbunny » Fri Sep 07, 2007 12:54 pm UTC

burserk wrote:Rabbit Angstrom by John Updike.
for me it was a long read by enjoyable one


I'm guessing you mean the quatrology...?
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Postby legion » Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:06 am UTC

I think it would have to be the Divine Comedy, by Dante Alighieri. While my original motives were un-pure (I had a C in Humanities in high school, wanted an A), I ended up redeeming myself. I didn't read the books in time for them to have an impact on my grade because I took so long in figuring them out. It took me the whole summer to understand the books, but I did it (to my satisfaction, at least), and for no one other than myself.

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Postby RockMuncher » Mon Sep 17, 2007 7:45 am UTC

Saul's Book, By Paul Rogers - Not because it was long, but because it was an emotionally devastating book to read, and I read it when I was relatively young.

Atlas Shrugged... not the entire book. I loved the book... but I am very proud I made it through then entirety of the radio speech without lapsing into an irreversible coma. Yes.. it is that long. And it likes to reiterate. A lot. Thats Rand for you, I suppose.

The entirety of the Bible, The Koran, The Tao Te Ching, and Bullfinches' Mythology. Because I want to know what people are referencing, and how they're getting it wrong. But lord some of the more archaic bits in all of them are insanely boring.

Oh, and the Sayings of Buddha, naturally (me being a Buddhist).

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Postby Gullindjemprins » Tue Sep 18, 2007 12:05 am UTC

War and Peace, followed by Crime and Punishment. What the hell I was thinking I will never know, but suffice it to say that it was NOT FUN. Especially since I did it within perhaps three days. And for "fun". However, it was a good feeling to finish them.

Also, we had to read Great Expectations, and with the exception of about 50 pages in the middle, I read it all. Actually I normally read all of everything, but at a certain point I just stopped caring and something died within me, and I skipped ahead. A lot. But still, good feeling to be done.

Oh, and while I've remembered Dickens, Tale of Two Cities was pretty good and good to finish as well.
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Postby dumbclown » Thu Sep 20, 2007 6:44 pm UTC

The book that I am proudest of having finished would be the first book that I read. I don't remember what it was called.

I don't have any books that I am proud of finishing because they were hard to read. Mainly because I continually read. I will read anything I can get my hands on so even if it is a tough read I will still get through it.

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Postby Transtar » Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:05 pm UTC

[quote="iknoritesrsly"]the city of god against the pagans.


wait, waaaaaaiiit. i never did finish that one.
but if i ever did, i would be proud.
[quote]


Agghh, that and "confessions". Requiered reading in my freshman year of college (went to an augustian university).

At least now I know where all the things I disagree with the Catholic church come from.

Back on topic:

For me it was "A Game of Thrones" ... I just could not get into that book for some reason. I have yet to try book 2.

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Postby I_Ate_My_Children » Sat Sep 22, 2007 12:49 pm UTC

Two Books:
Njál's Saga. Over 800 years old, 370 pages and I read it the Old Norse it was originally written in.
A very good and entertaining book, but with over 100 named characters and rather heavy to read.

and

Der Grundlagen der Arithmetik by Gottlob Frege
8)

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Postby podbaydoor » Sat Sep 22, 2007 8:35 pm UTC

The Bible, all three times.

In my defense, none of the three times were completely voluntary. But still, I felt accomplishment upon completing the final, head-tripping chapter of Revelations each time.

Also, I would've been proud to finish Descarte's Meditations. Except I hit a brick wall in the third meditation, spent three days trying to get through the same two paragraphs (something about the sun), gave up, and skimmed by for the rest of the class on SparkNotes. Come to think, out of the 5 or 6 books assigned for that semester, I only finished Candide and only because it was short and an (intermittently) entertaining satire.
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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby danb » Sun Sep 30, 2007 3:45 pm UTC

James Joyce's Ulysses, for sure. Jesus Christ was that a mindfuck.

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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby Amicitia » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:27 am UTC

danb wrote:James Joyce's Ulysses, for sure. Jesus Christ was that a mindfuck.

I thought it was fun to read. :<
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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby Angelene » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:40 am UTC

Ha, yes, Great Expectations....I skipped a rather dense bit in the middle, too...I thought generally the book could've been halved at no great loss to the story.
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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby wjt » Mon Oct 01, 2007 10:03 am UTC

Finnegans Wake.


Just kidding.

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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby Dreadnaught » Mon Oct 01, 2007 10:59 am UTC

Hands down it is Marx's Das Kapital. I swear, there were times in the midst of reading that behemoth that I would have preferred writhing agony that sit there and read it. But, in the end, it was worth it. I feel that I have a much better understanding of Marxism, and to a greater extent Capitalism. While Marx's ideas of what should be may have been a little off, his critiques of Capitalism were absolutely spot-on.
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Re:

Postby A'Tuin » Tue Oct 02, 2007 3:40 pm UTC

BlueNowhere wrote:I'll just have to add 1984. I have been meaning to read that for several summers now. I finished it just a couple of weeks ago.

With all the references that people have been making to it, I didn't want to feel left out.

That's all.

We've always been at war with Eurasia, and Eastasia has always been our ally.


I have to give anyone who's finished that book a pat on the back

*pat*

Im reading it chunk by chunk, I kept getting to depressed and giving it up im about half way. the rest of his stuff is good partically

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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby koalabäh » Tue Oct 02, 2007 4:53 pm UTC

Thomas Wolfe, Look Homeward Angel
The only thing that kept me going was his beautiful style. Man does that book drag on.

Moby Dick was really tough, but I don't really feel proud of having finished it. "Stupid" would be a better word. It took me weeks to finish it, weeks I could have spent doing something much more edifying and enjoyable... like organizing and polishing my urinal cake collection. What was I thinking?
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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby Dobblesworth » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:07 pm UTC

Getting all 3 LotR books down when I was about 14-15 was grueling. Fellowship especially took at least 100 pages to get rolling into the decent part of the plot you could link to the movie.

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Re: Book you are proudest to have finished...

Postby Sprocket » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:09 pm UTC

Soon to be Dune.
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