favorite lines/quotes from books

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Do you underline, highlight, or in some way mark your favorite lines?

yes - easier to find them later
23
5%
yes - I usually mark books when I read so marking favorite lines is just part of the deal
19
4%
no - writing in a book is desecrating a book
318
62%
no - I don't usually find passages that I find worth marking
11
2%
sometimes - only if it's really good
66
13%
otter
73
14%
 
Total votes: 510

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Solt
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Postby Solt » Thu Aug 09, 2007 9:55 am UTC

Books are trash. They're fucking pieces of paper. You throw paper in the trash every day.

It's the stories that they tell that are worth anything. As a medium, the books ought to work in both ways. Books can be reprinted faster than it takes you to wince at one that has writing in it.

Having a shelf full of pristine books makes you look like a fake. Someone who buys and perhaps even reads books because they want to feel smart. You should get as much as you can from a book, and if that might include writing the hell out of it, you damn well should.

Ironically, it's only the act of writing in them that makes them worth anything more than the hundreds of thousands of identical prints that were part of the same run.


The only (completed) one I have on hand, because I have it on my computer:

Dune wrote:The concept of progress acts as a protective mechanism to shield us from the terrors of the future.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,
produced a more reliable product. But sailors do
not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a
most annoying habit of splitting in two."
-J.W. Morris

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Postby notyouravgjoel » Thu Aug 09, 2007 3:05 pm UTC

Solt wrote:You should get as much as you can from a book, and if that might include writing the hell out of it, you damn well should.

Ironically, it's only the act of writing in them that makes them worth anything more than the hundreds of thousands of identical prints that were part of the same run.


Well said. I have always felt that marking a book is making it *yours*. Some people prefer making a journal of sorts about the books they read, copying passages here and there from the books, but I find that marking within the book is more effective.

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Jauss
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Postby Jauss » Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:35 pm UTC

Hmm. I hadn't really though about it, but I guess I don't personally like marking up fiction because when I'm reading it I want to be in the story as much as possible and not thinking "Why/when did I write that?" or "Oh yeah, hahaha" or otherwise thinking of things about the story (I do that enough as it is already) instead of being in it.

And since I often lend books to others (and vice versa) I don't want to take them out of it either. I have enjoyed reading marked up books before though, but it's a different experience. Kind of like how it can be okay (depending on movie/people) to talk about (or directly to :)) movies that you're watching with friends after everyone has seen it at least once.
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mrguy753
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Postby mrguy753 » Fri Aug 10, 2007 3:30 am UTC

This is not for you


First real lines of House of Leaves. Just struck me when i first read it. Didn't need to mark it, just stuck.
I sing anyway.

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Mairead
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Postby Mairead » Sun Aug 12, 2007 8:23 pm UTC

There's a cool line from Saturn over the Water by JB Preisly that I memorised to reuse in essays and stuff:

"I'm very wary of anything said about the masses. First, you take their faces away by calling them such and then you blame them for not having any faces."

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dagron
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Postby dagron » Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:15 am UTC

I can't write in books. Not even textbooks. It just seems so wrong to add my idiotic scribblings to someone else's awesome story and sully a pristine page.

More to the point: "The sky above the port was the color of television tuned to a dead channel." I don't know why, but that line always stuck with me. My favorite opening line. It really set an atmosphere.

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Postby ChooChoo » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:19 pm UTC

George Orwell, 1984 wrote:For, after all, how do we know that two and two makes four? Or that the force of gravity works? Or that the past is unchangeable? If both the past and the external world exist only in the mind, and the mind itself is controllable -- what then?


A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh wrote:"When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what's the first thing you say to yourself?"
"What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?"
"I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet.
Pooh nodded thoughtfully.
"It's the same thing," he said.


I love picking great quotes from books.

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Vaniver
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Postby Vaniver » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:36 pm UTC

no - I don't usually find passages that I find worth marking 0% [ 0 ]
This makes me glad.
I mostly post over at LessWrong now.

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FACM
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Postby FACM » Tue Aug 14, 2007 12:39 pm UTC

"Show your cock," she said, then died again.


Its from Pastoralia by George Saunders. Out of context, it's possibly the most confusing statement I've seen. Doesn't really give you any hint of whats going on at the time. But it makes perfect sense with the rest of the story.

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Postby Nimz » Thu Aug 16, 2007 9:10 am UTC

If I find a good quote, I'll write something on a scrap of paper referring to the page number and the book. If it's really good, I'll write the quote out after re-reading it. I can't think of any good quotes offhand, but that's probably because it's 2:00 and sleepiness is making me too apathetic to look for one.
LOWA

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Postby pollywog » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:27 am UTC

I don't mark the interesting passages I find in books, I try to remember them. As I can't remember any at the moment, I know that no book I have read lately has an interesting passage in it.
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Malice
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Postby Malice » Fri Aug 17, 2007 4:28 am UTC

Upon thinking about it, the reason I don't mark up a book is that I buy books in order to read them.

A book is a one-way conversation. The author is trying to say something to me, and my job is only to listen. Writing something in the book is presumptuous, and even marking a passage is distracting for when I wish to reread the book. It's probably the distraction factor more than anything--when I read, I rarely think about what I'm reading to any real extent. There's never a point in any mystery novel where I stop and wonder who the killer is; I simply keep reading until that information is provided. I read to listen; to imagine the story being told to me. Stopping to say something or mark something down breaks that flow of information and image and emotion; suddenly a book is reduced to paper and ink and glue from the story it was a moment before.

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Nimz
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Postby Nimz » Fri Aug 17, 2007 5:01 am UTC

Here we go. I found an awesome quote
I. A. Horowitz wrote:When a King Knight is thus pinned, a Pawn assault on the Bishop weakens the position of the King. When a Queen Knight is pinned, the consequence of a Pawn assault is not the same. The King does not enter into the reckoning, and the advanced Pawns dominate important terrain, which fact overshadows the weakness innate in the advance. Ergo, in the Nimzo-Indian, when, as, and if Black's King Bishop is attacked, say, by P-QR3, it is committed to the swap ... BxN. Since a Bishop is definitely, though minutely, more valuable than a Knight--Q. E. D.--Black's policy is inept.
(italics in the original)
Descriptive notation, Nimzo-Indian, Ergo, Q. E. D., what's not to love? :mrgreen:
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Lucien
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Postby Lucien » Mon Aug 20, 2007 2:17 pm UTC

The entire method of properly eating captain crunch cereal from Neal Stephensons Cryptonomicon.

It's about how I approach most things in life I enjoy.

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Postby dumbclown » Mon Aug 20, 2007 6:22 pm UTC

Malice wrote:There's a rather excellent passage in Brett Easton Ellis's novel, "The Rules of Attraction", towards the end, which I can never remember and never find online. I don't own the book, but I've read it twice and always loved the passage, whose general meaning is: Everybody's problems might not compare (kid who doesn't like broccoli versus kid who doesn't have food, for example), but for all that they are still problems and they still matter to that person and so they should still be taken seriously.

Anyways, he says it better than I can (and less directly), and it bothers me frequently because there are a lot of times when I'd like to use it. Only it's never there.


There is some kick arse quotes in the movie. I don't think they are from the book as well but. I still haven't got around to reading it.

I can never remember good quotes from books. Porno by Irvine Welsh has some good quotes by Sick Boy and Begbie in it. My current favorite is:

God Knows, Joseph Heller
Wisdom is better than rubies, and maybe even peacocks and apes.

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Nimz
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Postby Nimz » Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:51 pm UTC

dumbclown wrote:I can never remember good quotes from books. Porno by Irvine Welsh has some good quotes by Sick Boy and Begbie in it. My current favorite is:

God Knows, Joseph Heller
Wisdom is better than rubies, and maybe even peacocks and apes.
Oh man. I heard someone reading from God Knows, and it was hilarious.

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Postby Decker » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:47 pm UTC

"Unprofessional? Us? Sir. Might I with due respect remind you that Mister Vandemar and myself burned down the City of Troy? We brought the Black Plague to Flanders. We have assasinated a dozen kings, five popes, half a hundred heroes and two accredited gods. Our last commission before this was the torturing to death of an entire monastery in sixteenth century Tuscany. We are utterly professional."

-Mr. Croup, Neil Gaimen's Neverwhere

You don't fuck with Croup and Vandemar.
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Postby AKAnotu » Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:49 pm UTC

Douglas Adams wrote:Why are we born? Why do we die? And why do we spend so much of our time recieving junk mail?
Abraham Lincoln wrote:If you are racist, I will attack you with the north.

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Postby djn » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:13 am UTC

Solt wrote:Books are trash. They're fucking pieces of paper. You throw paper in the trash every day.

It's the stories that they tell that are worth anything. As a medium, the books ought to work in both ways. Books can be reprinted faster than it takes you to wince at one that has writing in it.


Some books are also objects of historical interest in themselves. Writing in your average new paperback? Go ahead. But if you do that to my beautiful 19th century Jules Verne books, I'll rip out your spleen.

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Postby TheStranger » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:35 am UTC

I don't usually mark up novels, though non-fiction books are fair game.

I keep a file on my laptop of quotes I like, and it has grown quite large over the years.

Albert Einstein wrote:"The most beautiful and most profound emotion we can experience
is the sensation of the mystical. It is the dower of all true
science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no
longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To
know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting
itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty which
our dull faculties can comprehend only in their most primitive
forms -- this knowledge, this feeling is at the center of true
religiousness."


Robert E. Lee wrote:"Duty, then, is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all
things... You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less."


Benjamin Franklin wrote:They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
deserve neither liberty nor safety."
"To bow before the pressure of the ignorant is weakness."
Azalin Rex, Wizard-King of Darkon

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Xaith
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Postby Xaith » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:37 am UTC

TheStranger wrote:I don't usually mark up novels, though non-fiction books are fair game.

I keep a file on my laptop of quotes I like, and it has grown quite large over the years.


Hey, same here! Maybe we should start a thread of our favorite, non-book quotes.

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TheStranger
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Postby TheStranger » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:46 am UTC

Xaith wrote:Hey, same here! Maybe we should start a thread of our favorite, non-book quotes.


Looking through my quotes file I see quotes from RPGs, computer games, ect.
"To bow before the pressure of the ignorant is weakness."
Azalin Rex, Wizard-King of Darkon

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Xaith
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Postby Xaith » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:49 am UTC

TheStranger wrote:Looking through my quotes file I see quotes from RPGs, computer games, ect.


Mine tend to lean more towards lines people have said in speeches/interviews/etc.

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TheStranger
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Postby TheStranger » Wed Aug 22, 2007 10:58 am UTC

Xaith wrote:Mine tend to lean more towards lines people have said in speeches/interviews/etc.



Ronald Reagan wrote:A state is nothing more than a reflection of its citizens;
the more decent the citizens, the more decent the state
"To bow before the pressure of the ignorant is weakness."
Azalin Rex, Wizard-King of Darkon

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Stief
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Postby Stief » Fri Aug 31, 2007 12:14 am UTC

(I know it's technically not a book...it's a graphic Novel)

Grant Morrison in Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth wrote:I looked at the doll's house, and the doll's house

looked.

at.

me...


[quote="Charles Lutwidge Dodgson"]“'But I don’t want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
'Oh, you can’t help that,' said the Cat. 'We’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.'
'How do you know I’m mad?' said Alice.
'You must be,' said the Cat. 'or you wouldn’t have come here.'â€
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Postby MFHodge » Fri Sep 21, 2007 2:55 pm UTC

Here's one I just read from "The Picture of Dorian Gray":
Oscar Wilde, on a poor girl falling in love with a rich man, wrote:"He wants to enslave you."

"I shudder at the thought of being free."
Image

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Menace
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Postby Menace » Fri Sep 21, 2007 6:05 pm UTC

I'm reading through Neil Gaiman's Sandman comic series again, so I have to throw up some quotes from it.

Delirium wrote:I knew it would be in the last place I looked, so I looked there first.


Receptionist: "Can I have a name?"

Delerium: "Don't you have one? ... If you don't have a name, what do people call you? I mean, do they just wave and smile, or jingle little silver bells or what?"

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Dostoevsky
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Postby Dostoevsky » Mon Sep 24, 2007 5:57 pm UTC

i'm taking a couple of existentialism courses this semester. You can't read too much 19th century existentialism without marking the book or youll go nuts

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Gem » Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:13 am UTC

I don't mark my books, but most of my favourite quotes come from Discworld or the Hitchhiker's Guide series. For example:

"PEOPLE'S WHOLE LIVES DO PASS IN FRONT OF THEIR EYES BEFORE THEY DIE. THE PROCESS IS CALLED 'LIVING'."

"The mattress flolloped around. This is a thing that only live mattresses in swamps are able to do, which is why the word is not in more common usage."

"If you want to survive in life, you've got to know where your towel is."

Not unnaturally, many elevators imbued with intelligence and precognition became terribly frustrated with the mindless business of going up and down, up and down, experimented briefly with the notion of going sideways, as a sort of existential protest, demanded participation in the decision-making process and finally took to squatting in basements sulking.

"All it takes to fly is to throw yourself at the ground...and miss"

"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move."

Sorry, there's kind of a lot. But I couldn't leave any out!

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Re:

Postby xndrew » Mon Oct 29, 2007 12:59 pm UTC

mrguy753 wrote:
This is not for you


First real lines of House of Leaves. Just struck me when i first read it. Didn't need to mark it, just stuck.


Yes yes yes.

All I want is to run and then jump. I am telling him that if we both just run and jump without bumping or biting we will run faster and jump farther. We will be stronger and do more beautiful things.
-Dave Eggers, How We Are Hungry "After I Was Thrown In The River And Before I Drowned" (Short story. One of the best titles for any piece I've ever heard.)

Chatterton knew he was dead. He kept pumping anyway. You did not give up on a human being just because he was dead.
-Robert Kurson, Shadow Divers

And I don't have my copy of Bear v Shark on me, but if I did, I'd have about a million from it.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby someguy » Mon Oct 29, 2007 2:28 pm UTC

The next ones may be a bit obvious, but then I'm not the most prolific of readers:

Douglas Coupland on Generation X wrote:'Everybody has a
'gripping stranger' in their lives, Andy, a stranger who unwittingly possesses
a bizarre hold over you. Maybe it's the kid in cut-
offs who mows your lawn or the woman wearing
White Shoulders who stamps your book at the
library—a stranger who, if you were to come home
and find a message from them on your answering
machine saying 'Drop everything. I love you.
Come away with me now to Florida,' you'd follow
them.'


(excuse the formatting, I cut-and-pasted it and it got all mangled up)

From the same book:

The door knocks and Elvissa quickly pops her head inside, "Just wanted to say bye, Andy." "Elvissa—my brother's on hold long distance. Can you wait a sec?" "No. This is best." She kisses me on the ridge at the top of my nose, between my eyes. A damp kiss that reminds me that girls like Elvissa, spontaneous, a tetch trashy but undoubtedly alive, are somehow never going to be intimate with constipated deadpan fellows like me.


We live small lives on the periphery; we are marginalized and there's a great deal in which we choose not to participate. We wanted silence and we have that silence now. We arrived here speckled in sores and zits, our colons so tied in knots that we never thought we'd have a bowel movement again. Our systems had stopped working, jammed with the odor of copy machines, Wite-Out, the smell of bond paper, and the endless stress of pointless jobs done grudgingly to little applause. We had com­pulsions that made us confuse shopping with creativity, to take downers and assume that merely renting a video on a Saturday night was enough. But now that we live here in the desert, things are much, much better.


(I should've made that last one shorter somehow.)

There are also a few I love on Kerouac's On The Road, but I don't have that one handy.
aleflamedyud wrote:Plenty of people have confidence without any base of actual virtue or accomplishment beneath it. We call these people "douchebags".


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xndrew
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby xndrew » Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:04 pm UTC

someguy wrote:There are also a few I love on Kerouac's On The Road, but I don't have that one handy.

There's one line at the end of the book that made the entire thing worth it for me, but my copy is with a friend, who's traveling at the moment, and I wouldn't want to butcher it.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Lyra Ngalia » Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:27 pm UTC

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell wrote:The other ministers considered that to employ a magician was one thing, novelists werre quite another and they would not stoop to it.


In fact, much of that book is in my favorite quotes.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path... Only I will remain.

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Re:

Postby nevskey1 » Sun Nov 04, 2007 4:02 am UTC

OmenPigeon wrote:So I write in my books because I like to think that theres other people out there who like reading other people's margins as much as I do, and maybe my books will get to them. It's like passing notes in class.


Yep, fully agree. Very nicely stated. I've always marked my books, as long as I can remember. Fiction I just underline, non-fiction I also annotate.

But I really noticed the awsomeness of reading other peoples notes about a year ago. I was reading a librarfy copy of We by Zamyatin, and somewhere in the middle of it, right in a page break in the center, a reader had written in blue pen, "Note to future readers: I'm getting pretty tired of this shit." It was the greatest thing. I realized I felt the same way, wrote in "Agreed," and hurredly finished the rest of the book. It was the best "eh" book experience I've ever had.
"Personally, I'd never want to be a member of any group where you either have to wear a hat or you can't wear a hat." --George Carlin.


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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby xndrew » Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:07 am UTC

Okay, so maybe I'm a little altered, but the novice writers have the most to say. The ones that haven't said damn near anything, the ones that have struggled against their own won words, the ones that feel that they can never convey what they feel. I'm sorry, I'm gone, forgive me.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby tiny » Sun Nov 04, 2007 1:24 pm UTC

I only mark passages in textbooks. In fiction it would interrupt my reading process. I want to dive into a story and not trip over pencil scribblings.

Robert Schneider - 'Schlafes Bruder'/'Brother of Sleep' wrote:Und zum Peter sagte er einmal: "Was muessen die armen Menschen suchen und irren! Von einem Geliebten zum andern hetzen sie und wissen nicht, dass Gott ihnen einen Menschen von Ewigkeit her zugedacht hat. Einen Menschen, der dasselbe Herzschlagen traegt wie sie. Diese Kleinen! Sie sind ohne Vertrauen und haben nicht die Geduld, zu warten, bis daß Gott ihnen den Ort und die Stunde anzeigt."

I (try to) translate:
And to Peter he once said: "What do these people have to search and err! From one lover to the next they rush, and do not know that God has one person meant for them for all eternity. A person who bears the same heart beat as them. How small they are! They do not trust and have not the patience to wait until God shows them the place and the time."
I like the thought of someone belonging to me, sharing something as basic, intimate and metaphorical as the heart beat. To me, this picture holds the very essence of love.

Margriet de Moor - 'Der Virtuose'/'The Virtuoso' wrote:Da mir nicht entgeht, das Gasparo vorhat, stillschweigend und mit unerschuetterlicher Miene aus meinem Leben zu verschwinden, schneide ich ihm in der schmalen Tueroeffnung den Weg ab. Auf beiden Seiten bildet sich ein kleiner Stau.
Er sieht mich befremdet an.
"Leg die Arme um mich", sage ich.
Er macht eine unbestimmte Bewegung.
"Alle beide."

I (try to) translate:
Because it doesn't pass me that Gasparo has the intention of leaving my life silently and with an immoveable countenance, I cut his way in the small opening of the door. On both sides a small tailback ensues.
Alienated, he looks at me.
"Put your arms around me", I say.
He makes an indetermined movement.
"Both of them."
This quote kind of contains the essence of the whole, lopsided relationship between Gasparo and Carlotta. It is totally dreamlike. She wants him to embrace her, he doesn't follow, yet she acts as if he had fulfilled at least half of her wish (and put one arm around her).
She is so determined to have a mutual love and nearly overflows with affection for Gasparo (who likes her, but that's it), so that even the smalles word, look or movement can change the whole world around for her. Although she suffers when Gasparo isn't with her she's very frugal, actually. All that matters is in her head, her interpretation of her 'Eternal Love', how she calls him.
And it's all written so beautifully. The sentences are well built and create a rhythm that is perfect for an ending.
"I write what I see, the endless procession to the guillotine." ~ de Sade

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Angelene » Sun Nov 04, 2007 2:02 pm UTC

Sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I'm not living,

She wants to know if I love her, that's all anyone wants from anyone else, not love itself, but the knowledge that love is there.

It's a shame that we have to live, but it's a tragedy that we get to live only one life.

I wondered, for the first time in my life, if life was wroth all the work it took to live.

I wanted to be able to say : I don't know how I could have tried harder.

It's a strange thing to discover and to believe that you are loved when you know that there is nothing in you for anybody but a parent or a God to love.

Eternity is said not to be an extension of time, but an absence of time.

As long as one suffers, one lives.

I miss what I already have, and I surround myself with things that are missing.

Everything will be OK.
Everything will be OK Perfect.
Everything will be OK Perfect.

You cannot protect yourself from sadness without protecting yourself from happiness.

It takes a life to learn how to live.

- I do not know how to live.
--I do not know either, but I am trying.
- I do not know how to try.

I'm so afraid of losing something I love that I refuse to love anything.

I can't take back the things I never did.

The slowly growing pain in my upper arm where her weight lay was the greatest pleasure I had ever known.


The above are either Jonathan Safran Foer, or Graham Greene...I read a few books one week and made notes of that which was written which I loved...I can't remember which is attributable to whom in all cases.

Everything has a purpose on this earth, and all things fulfill their purpose - seaweed, dung beetles, parasites - without agonizing or questioning. We are the only part of Creation that is blinded by desires and thus ignore our particular purpose, individually and collectively, and spend our lives in mad pursuit of nothingness.
--Gottfried Llewelyn-Jones, Anatomy and Evolution of Universal Madness--
Waiting Period, Hubert Selby Jr.
"Some people need a red carpet rolled out in front of them in order to walk forward into friendship. They can't see the tiny outstretched hands all around them, everywhere, like leaves on trees."

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xenuphobia
Posts: 145
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:34 am UTC

Re:

Postby xenuphobia » Sun Nov 04, 2007 4:15 pm UTC

Malice wrote:There's a rather excellent passage in Brett Easton Ellis's novel, "The Rules of Attraction", towards the end, which I can never remember and never find online. I don't own the book, but I've read it twice and always loved the passage, whose general meaning is: Everybody's problems might not compare (kid who doesn't like broccoli versus kid who doesn't have food, for example), but for all that they are still problems and they still matter to that person and so they should still be taken seriously.

Anyways, he says it better than I can (and less directly), and it bothers me frequently because there are a lot of times when I'd like to use it. Only it's never there.


I think this is it.

Bret Easton Ellis wrote:I wasn't being cynical about that bitch and her asshole boyfriend. I really believed that the extent of their pitiful problems didn't exceed too far from what I thought. They didn't have to worry about keeping warm or being fed or bombs or lasers or gunfire. Maybe their lover left them, maybe that copy of 'Speaking in Tongues' was really scratched - that was this term's model and their problems. But then I came to understand sitting there, the box vibrating beneath me, the band blaring in my head that these problems and the pain they felt were genuine. I mean, this girl probably had a lot of money and so did her dumb-looking boyfriend. Other people might not sympathize with this couple's problems and maybe they didn't really matter in the larger realm of things - but they still mattered to Jeff and Susie; these problems hurt them, these things stung.
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cathrl
Posts: 427
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 9:58 am UTC

Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby cathrl » Sun Nov 04, 2007 5:03 pm UTC

nthing those who never write in fiction books.

I read fiction as pretty much an immersion experience - I lose myself in it and come up for air occasionally, when forced. I can't imagine choosing to read in such a detached way that I could start noting down particularly good phrases. The thing I most loathed about studying literature at school was being forced to read like that. It came very close to destroying my love of reading altogether.

As a result, I do have favourite lines and quotes, but they're the ones that were so memorable that they stuck in my mind all by themselves. I don't think I have any of them written down anywhere.


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