Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

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When did you start reading?

Age 4
222
65%
Age 5
66
19%
Age 6
31
9%
Age 7
15
4%
Age 8
8
2%
Age 9
2
1%
 
Total votes: 344

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Melkarion
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Re: Re:

Postby Melkarion » Tue Aug 05, 2008 8:04 pm UTC

Cryopyre wrote:
Jesse wrote:First book, third birthday. Was about a boy called Gary (The books would put any name you wanted in, so my parents used my name) who met a dinosaur and went on an awesome adventure.


Holy shit, I think I have the same book


I think Ihad that book too, until it got lost in flood.

Funny thing is, if it is the same book, my parent's didn't decide to put my name in it...

I'm not really sure what, if anything, that signifies.
Last edited by Melkarion on Wed Aug 06, 2008 1:45 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby hideki101 » Tue Aug 05, 2008 8:14 pm UTC

I know I started reading books before pre-school, and chapter books by first grade. So about fourish. I think my first chapter book was Timothy Zahn's Heir to the Empire. It's carried me all this way, and I am still into the Star Wars EU. (currently 100+ books)
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Wittyname » Sat Aug 23, 2008 1:38 pm UTC

Man - 7/8 is old to start reading.

When I was 2 I could read words, when I was 3 I could read kiddy books (the very hungry caterpillar, anyone?). By the time I was 7 I had read Great Expectations - it gave my teacher a bit of a shock in the first reading time of the year to see a 7 year old half way through it, she quizzed me on it to make sure I hadn't just picked it up to look smart.

I wasn't the only one in my class who could read quite proficiently by the time I started school (we start at 4 over here). There was a whole group of us - we got pretty much left to our own devices for the first couple of years, life was sweeeet...

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby AntonGarou » Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:02 pm UTC

I started reading around age 7 for various reasons- among them that I was born late in the year so that my parents opted to have me as among the oldest in my class rather then the reverse and a perverse insistence on my part to wait for school to begin rather then begin the summer before with my father teaching me-OTOH once I really began to read(about half a year into school) I plowed through books in a pretty decent clip, and was hooked onto SF&F early by my father and aunt(my father introduced me to Asimov, my aunt to The Hobbit).By 8th grade it got to the point that when my father saw my(bad) English marks he got that devious spark in his eyes and said "you know, there are many more interesting books in English then in Hebrew(my native tongue)"- by 12th I was regularly bored in English class and pretty much teacher's pet in that part of studies.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby KestrelLowing » Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:40 pm UTC

McCaber wrote:Yeah, I was reading those Boxcar Children books in the summer between preschool and kindergarten. And they're still good.


Hey, that's almost me - I'm a year later.

I don't know when I started to read - my parents don't either. Like many in this thread, I simply could read one day. My parents didn't directly teach me, but they always read to me and my siblings (my siblings are 5 and 7 years older than me, so we typically read things above my actual reading ability). I remember being read The Hobbit before I was in Kindergarten, but I wasn't actually reading, just listening.

Best guess would be around 3 or so - that's when I started reading music and playing the piano, and I'm pretty sure I could read at that point. I don't remember reading in preschool, but I know I could read music, and sang and played A Tiscit, a Tasket for a talent show in preschool, so I guess I must have been by that point.

The only think I know for sure is that I was reading The Boxcar Children between kindergarten and 1st grade (5 years old). I went to a camp with my mom (she was the choir director - hence the learning piano at age 3), and her accompanist was amazed that I was reading chapter books. Amazingly, I always thought of Benny as juvenile, even though if memory serves me right, he was about the same age as me when I started reading the series.

I may have been reading chapter books before that, but I have no recollection.

Slightly off topic, I guess, but did anyone else who read fairly early, and fairly quickly have major problems with spelling? My 3rd-5th grade teacher had a theory that I had such issues with spelling tests because of that. I would just recognize the words, and never, ever need to sound them out, so I never did.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby theGoldenCalf; » Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:30 pm UTC

4 here. I actually nagged my parents into teaching me how to read, after being so frustrated about the fact that they weren't able to read to me every waking minute of the day, but only for 4 or 5 hours, which was way too little. We only had 1 TV for 100 families where we lived, and I was afraid of everything there was on it (including sesame street!), had no siblings by then, so I actively drove them insane. I clearly remember my mom taking me shopping for a book, as this was the only birthday present I wanted at age 4, at which incident I insisted on an educational book intended at teaching young hassidic kids how to read (we're mostly all kikes 'round here) - religious-zealot-brainwashing cover to cover - my family being about as religious as Stalin and living in a "kibbutz" (small, mostly-agricultural and vehemently-socialistic commune). Needless to say I went home with that very book thinking how starting tomorrow I'll read any book I wanted, by myself. In reality, it took like 6 months.

Earliest reading experiences I can remember are mostly Dr. Seuss and militant-socialist-ideology-for-kids books, as that's what they had in the kids' library for my age, and we were only allowed (as in given actual cash) to buy personal stuff like twice a year as the whole idea of personal property was frowned upon. Both genres rocked my 4-year-old world. I spent 1st and 2nd grade teaching my friends how to read (while the adorable 20 year-old girl the kibbutz designated as teacher was busy looking for piles of hay with her boyfriend), even have some memories of reading to friends in kindergarten.

At 3rd grade, after leaving said commune and being able to find our own interests in the world, I discovered Jules Verne, Gerald Durrell, and Narnia. Happy, happy days. Then sometime at 4th or 5th grade I stumbled upon a shaggy copy of The Hobbit in the local library, not having the faintest idea what it was or that Tolkien ever existed, and read it around 20 times in the following two or three years. The first time I've finished it I actually turned it over to the beginning and started reading it again on the spot.

Junior high years were dominated by Asimov and Stephen King (whom I've kept as a guilty pleasure for almost a decade later), high school years by chasing girls and reading only what I needed for school - which was divided into stuff I hated (Jerzy Kosinsky, catcher in the rye) to stuff I absolutely loved (Moliere, Gary/Ajar, Amos Oz). I actually read catch 22 during military service, and it reflected everything around me so truly and precisely, I could have written it myself. If I were a literary genius. Which I'm not.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Aequitas » Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:48 pm UTC

I didn't start reading until I was six, in the first grade, when my school system taught us how to read. My mother and father felt that it was the school system's job to educate me, so they never tried to give me a head start or anything. Which ultimately didn't matter as I'm a natural born student.

I've been reading constantly since I learned how to. My parents never encouraged or discouraged me. I read a lot on the go until I became a working adult. I always took a book with me to read while mom was shopping or during a car ride as a child. I also read a lot during classes when I had free time. In college, I always read a lot on the bus and between classes.

The OP seems to have had a mixed relationship with reading. I can somewhat empathize. I never longed for popularity, and I was never really picked on for being a nerdy reader kid, I just always have longed for friends to talk about books with. I'm almost 25 now and that's one of my major problems with reading, my favorite hobby, yet my loneliest of hobbies. None of my friends have read anything in the past six months, And when they do, they stick to the narrow confines of fantasy and adventure novels. Don't get me started on how hard it is to find a date who cares about books as much as I do. Sometimes I get physically ill because I have no one to discuss the ideas of The Brothers Karamazov with or the beauty of Robert Penn Warren's language from All the King's Men. It can definitely be an isolating passion, but I'm the kind of person who'd rather see the world burn rather than change my hobbies to suit everyone else.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Dave_Wise » Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:56 pm UTC

I don't honestly know, but I was certainly reading by the time I went to primary school- age 4 in Wales. My theory is that mum, a former research scientist living in a part of Wales known for sheep, stupidity and nationalism, got bored of having nobody to talk nerd with. Bedtime stories were often along the lines of the lonely electron with only a proton to play with, the friendly oxhygen molecule, etc. I have an older brother and a younger sister, and it quickly became a competition with my brother to see who could read the longest book. He was in the lead for 2 years with the lord of the rings, perhaps accounting for the unreasonable number of times I've read it, before I trounced him with Plutarch's lives.
I was never really into fiction until teenagerhood, though. Tolkein doesn't count, and neither does homer. I tended to go for longer fiction, and still do to this day. Late on in primary school, I discovered a tattered copy of watership down. It was re-read about 5 times Then I discovered discworld. Now I'm making up for my omissions. Having sated my hunger for fantasy with dune, I'm branching out into 'serious' literature. My main problem is that waterstones in my home town have warned me that if I don't make an effort to behave like a normal human being, I'll be banned. I think what did it was the time I sidled up to an employee and asked him discreetly where they kept the 'hard stuff'. 'What hard stuff?' 'You know, literature. Poetry. Classic novels. (stage whispered) Jeez, do I need to spell it out in front of all these people? Something that's not chick lit, science fiction or fantasy...'
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby mclaughlin129 » Wed Apr 07, 2010 1:07 am UTC

for me it was about 2ish. my mother read me newsweek until she felt i was starting to actually comprehend what she was saying, which she claims is the reason why i have such a large vocabulary. i know i was reading hardy boys by kindergarten and shakespeare in fifth grade. i started LOTR in third grade but the battle of helms deep scared me (i have too active of an imagination) so i stopped right before gandalf saved the day. i cant remember any specific books because i read a combination of the "little kids" books and level books i could actually read so its all mixed in my mind now. of course learning to read, and speak, early compared to most people probably is the reason why my mind works mainly with words instead of pictures now. but i really dont care as long as i can keep my exceedingly eccentric collection of books.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby DocOpt » Wed Apr 07, 2010 4:58 am UTC

I have my mother to thank who is a librarian and read to me constantly, when i was four I had the book Bubble bubble memorized I don't know if i could actually read it but I could say the words on each page because she read it to me so many times, but i know I was reading shortly after that I asked her.

Now reading is more of a curse to me since I'm tired of video games, ill stay up way to late reading the book I have at the time, also its a fairly large money sink for me because I like purchasing the books, I like the look of full bookshelves, and that way I can loan the books to my friends of they are looking for something to read.

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Re:

Postby BlueNight » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:57 am UTC

Jesse wrote:First book, third birthday. Was about a boy called Gary (The books would put any name you wanted in, so my parents used my name) who met a dinosaur and went on an awesome adventure.


In mine, I discovered that a sad clown with my name led me and my giraffe pal to a circus in need of a place to perform. We led them back to my house.

Alas, I did not answer because I too was hyperlexic, reading by age 3. My diagnosed and medicated ADHD was later rediagnosed as Asperger's - too late to save my free-ride comp-sci scholarship. Now I scan blueprints all day at 1.2x minimum wage, and dream of a parallel universe where I program awesome things for money.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby lollypatrolly » Sun Apr 18, 2010 5:30 am UTC

Well, I voted 6. Though I'd of course read children's books before that, those were occupied as much by pictures as words, so I don't think they count, really. My interest for literature didn't really take off before I discovered fantasy / scifi at around age 9-10. Though I could read very basic sentences by 4. I guess that's late for these forums, damn you all x_X

I never had any experience getting flak for reading. Most of the kids didn't consider it all that nerdy, and I wasn't the best bully target around (I don't know why, I was both weak and nerdy! :P maybe because I'd retaliate...). Most of my friends used to read, and they still do, so I guess I was kind of sheltered. But then, that is just my personal experience, and I imagine there are a lot of people who weren't as fortunate. This still shouldn't discourage you from sharing some books, being literate helps so much in school and later on in life. However I share your sentiment regarding the fact that there's a limit to how much you can coach them into reading. While some should be encouraged, having a large spread of interests / activities is a good thing, and makes them come less off as "nerds".

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Re:

Postby El Spark » Wed Apr 21, 2010 7:41 pm UTC

Alisto wrote:Man, you guys are young... started reading when Animorphs came out? I feel so old.

Also, Encyclopedia Brown books for the win.


This. Also the Three Investigators.

When I was growing up, my mom worked at a library. There was often little else to do, since I was there for a couple hours at a time (aka eternity, at age 6). I was reading early, and soon enough I was reading a lot and often. I know I read the entire Wizard of Oz series by age 7 (all 12 books or whatever it was they had there), and that the very first book that I finished in one day was The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Okapi » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:11 pm UTC

Couldn't read till I was six, but I've made up for lost time. And I could program, build a computer, and do Calculus before that. Language has always just been low on my list of priorities. Plus, I had a speech impediment.

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Re: Re:

Postby McCaber » Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:55 pm UTC

El Spark wrote:that the very first book that I finished in one day was The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet.

That book was fucking awesome. I thought I was the only one who even saw that guy, except for Alan Moore's shout-out at the end of LEG.
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Re: Re:

Postby El Spark » Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:32 pm UTC

McCaber wrote:
El Spark wrote:that the very first book that I finished in one day was The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet.

That book was fucking awesome. I thought I was the only one who even saw that guy, except for Alan Moore's shout-out at the end of LEG.

Actually, you'll be glad to know that they're reprinting that and the other books in the series.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Wed Apr 28, 2010 6:00 am UTC

I started reading at 2 1/2. My mother was an English professor and my father was an engineer, and both of them devoured books, so I had plenty of good examples. They read chapter books aloud until we began following along, then switched to books with simpler words so we could teach ourselves. My sister was about the same, though I was better at memorization than she was (still am... I was just born with a good memory and she wasn't), so it's fully possible that she learned to actually read a little earlier, while I taught myself to read by reciting books. She certainly was a more advanced talker than I was. I was reading chapter books and memorizing poems and chapters of the Bible by the time I was 4. Of course, I went to a school where the memorizing poems and chapters of the Bible was expected, so I wasn't that exceptional.

There's a picture of my sister and I, about ages 4 and 3, sitting on a stack of books, our noses buried in our own stories.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Sheikh al-Majaneen » Mon May 03, 2010 2:33 am UTC

When I entered Kindergarten, I couldn't read. By Christmas, I was working my way through the 1985 funk and wagnalls encyclopaedia.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Supertycoon » Mon May 03, 2010 3:35 am UTC

I remember getting a book as a prize when I was four. I also remember me thinking it was very childish. I have the book somewhere, I might go dig it up...

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby WarDaft » Mon May 10, 2010 11:28 pm UTC

I remember very little of when I was young, but I do know that I was at least starting to read and write at 3. I'd like to say it was due to encouragement, or self interest...

I think I'll leave it at that actually.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Midnight » Wed May 19, 2010 7:01 pm UTC

I LEARNED to read when i was three or so. older sister taught me. I started reading books and stuff at four though. knocked out damn near every animorphs book in 3rd grade, and... well, a lot of others. Most of Tolkien in 4th grade, and all of the Lion/Witch/Wardrobe books... think I officially tested as a college level reader at the start of 5th. Which sucked cause we took those tests in 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th grade. my score never changed.

edit:
okapi wrote:and do Calculus before [I was six].

I say goddamn. I can't do anything past Algebra II. Logarithms are about the extent of my knowledge... and I have a feeling I'll fail any and all math classes in college unless I start going out with a math major.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby handiangel » Wed May 19, 2010 7:48 pm UTC

I think I was reading (not necessarily fully comprehending) by 4 maybe 5, when I was at kindergarten, which I think might start earlier in the UK by the sounds of it... (I may be talking out my backside though).

I remember just devouring the Roahl Dahl books. I read them multiple times each, even the more obscure titles like Esio Trot, and the biographies. I must have read the Hobbit at about 9, because I remember attempting LotR at 10. I only got halfway through the Two Towers before I gave up. I found it too confusing, especially with all the names and stuff.

I read the Redwall series too. I really enjoyed them.

At the end of year 5 (9/10yo), I apparently had the highest reading age of my year, of about 15. Since then, I have mainly read Harry Potter and fanfiction.

When I was studying for GCSEs (15/16yo) I was reading Harry Potter 1 in French in my French classes, because I was so bored of repeatedly doing verb conjugating. I attempted reading HP in German, but that was too difficult, I hadn't studied German for nearly so long...

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Slpee » Sat May 22, 2010 7:12 pm UTC

The poll! It goes not low enough!

No seriously, i was so insanely hooked into reading at a very young age.
Some of my earliest memories from 3-4 are going to the library and getting upwards of 30 books. Going home, and immediately going right into them one at a time.
My parents used to take away my library books as a punishment, that's how reading obsessed I was. (And before you says anything, it worked, I learned to behave, quickly)
Also, I completely ditched phonics, I would just beg to be read to a lot, and sooner or later, I started to connect sounds with symbols.


Also anyone here read Magic Tree House as a kid? those books were my childhood.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Ulc » Mon May 24, 2010 10:00 am UTC

Just voted 9 years, which I think needs some explaining.

I have a mild case of dyslexia, and my teachers were all of the type "dyslexia doesn't exist, he's just stupid", so I had no help at all - until near the end of third grade where I finally got special classes with a really good teacher, within two months I was reading at the same level as the rest of my year, within a half a year more I had more or less devoured the entire school library.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby sje46 » Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:33 am UTC

I don't understand how all you guys can answer this poll so confidently. Did you ask your parents or something? I have no idea when I started reading. I remember reading the animorphs books starting at about 8/9 years old. And I read them quickly (quickly for me...I'm not a slow reader...but a leisurely one. I take my time) and confidently. I remember in third/fourth grade getting annoyed about how everyone stuttered when they read out loud. I was never slow with reading. But I sure as heck don't remember the first time I read a book.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Lioness » Sun Jun 06, 2010 11:59 am UTC

I started reading really early. Maybe 3 or 4. When they put me on the class readers with the other kids, I just kept moving up levels.

For the early years, most of what I read was the class stuff. Books designed especially for learning to read. None of them really stood out. Age 7-8 I found Animorphs, Colin Thiele, and the realm of short novels. I think I first read Deltora Quest and Rowan of Rin around there too...They got me into fantasy. Age 9-10: Tamora Pierce and John Marsden. That, I think, was when I started to read obsessively. I recall being told in year 7 by a peer, "You can't read that book (Stone Mage & the Sea, Sean Williams). It's for adults".

But yeah, first book I recall reading that was too much for me was The Fire in the Stone, by Colin Theile. I was 8. It got a bit dull in the middle, or I got distracted reading something else. I went back to it when I was 12 and got through it just fine.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Chuff » Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:22 am UTC

Slpee wrote:Also anyone here read Magic Tree House as a kid? those books were my childhood.
Oh my god yes. I loved Magic Tree House. That series, and Redwall.

Voted 6 years old. I wasn't particularly young, but I'm fairly devout about it.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Lioness » Mon Jun 07, 2010 7:18 am UTC

Chuff wrote:
Slpee wrote:Also anyone here read Magic Tree House as a kid? those books were my childhood.
Oh my god yes. I loved Magic Tree House. That series, and Redwall.

Voted 6 years old. I wasn't particularly young, but I'm fairly devout about it.


Magic Tree House? Or Magic Faraway Tree?

I spent a lot of my childhood reading Enid Blyton. My grandparents had a ton of her books...Secret Seven, Famous Five, Faraway Tree, Wishing Chair...They're great.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Chuff » Tue Jun 08, 2010 2:20 am UTC

Lioness wrote:
Chuff wrote:
Slpee wrote:Also anyone here read Magic Tree House as a kid? those books were my childhood.
Oh my god yes. I loved Magic Tree House. That series, and Redwall.

Voted 6 years old. I wasn't particularly young, but I'm fairly devout about it.


Magic Tree House? Or Magic Faraway Tree?

I spent a lot of my childhood reading Enid Blyton. My grandparents had a ton of her books...Secret Seven, Famous Five, Faraway Tree, Wishing Chair...They're great.

Magic Tree House. It was about these kids who find a treehouse full of books and get transported to anywhere they read about.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby orinjuse » Tue Jun 08, 2010 2:57 am UTC

I voted for 5, since that's when I read my first actual novel. My teacher was reading my year two class Matilda, but she was going too slow so I borrowed a copy and read it myself. I can't remember when I actually learned to read, though.
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby lauripple » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:56 pm UTC

I voted for four, but I started reading in my third year. Actually, I was reading Chinese before English, even though I was born American. Technically, Chinese was my first language, but I learned the two both in early years.

In grade school, while everyone was going over "hat, cat, sat, sit, pit, dog", I was being bored in the corner reading Hardy Boys mysteries


That's exactly how I spent Kindergarten or 1st grade (can't remember which), except I read Nancy Drew instead!

I think I was fairly lucky to have been born with a strong urge for learning, rather than have learning be forced down my throat. My parents never had to force me to read at such an early age; I wanted to. So instead of growing up with a mentality of "intelligence > all", I was able to live a normal social life, while still satisfying my curiosity. Granted, I was still labeled a nerd quite often since that's rather difficult to avoid if you're constantly reading and excelling at school. Maybe in elementary school I was rather unpopular, but in middle school it got a lot easier.

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Ivor Zozz
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Ivor Zozz » Mon Jun 21, 2010 10:41 pm UTC

Sorry to go off topic, but is the thread title a Bill Hicks reference?

:wink:
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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby RabbitWho » Wed Jun 30, 2010 7:57 am UTC

I don't remember.. I know I never had any problems with reading.. I learned it fast and was reading books for 10 year olds when my friends were reading ladybird books. When I started I don't know... I imagine I learned in school so started at 5, and just learned faster than everyone else. But my parents were reading to me at home and I watched television a hell of a lot.. TV has lots of words and it usually reads them out. I really have no idea.

But writing was agonizingly hard. All of the problems I had then I still have now, spelling, spacing, capitals vs. lower case. It's okay when you only have to write "Today is Friday" but it got worse and worse the more we had to write.
I'd say we started getting spelling tests at maybe 7? 8? 0 out of ten. Every single spelling test until I was 12 and too old for spelling tests. And then we got the internet AND IT FIXED ME. :) With spelling, not with handwriting of course.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby podbaydoor » Wed Jul 07, 2010 6:19 pm UTC

How have I never noticed this thread? Reading was my LIFE until senior year of high school (then I got busy and began to do most of my reading on the interwebs. I'm graduated from college now, but I just applied for a library card and I hope to get back into reading novels again). The library was my spiritual refuge from ages 3-16, the one place where I could escape to and never be hurt, far more significantly than church ever was.

I started around age 3, I think. As far as my conscious memory is concerned, I've always been able to read and read everything in sight - if there wasn't a book handy, I read magazines, newspapers, catalogues, junk mail. :P In 8th grade, my mom actually called the school and got me banned from the library because my grades were dropping so much from me reading instead of doing homework (and sneaking books into class instead of listening to the lecture). The Texas public education system has this thing called Accelerated Reader, where you go to the library and take these 10-question quizzes for each book and you get points from each quiz. At the end of the year, you could redeem your accumulated points for prizes. The height of my triumph was 8th grade (the same year I was banned from the library) when I had over 800 points and the next runner-up had less than 500. I love the Lord of the Rings trilogy (I read Two Towers and Return of the King back to back in one sitting) but I loved them more for being worth 30 points...each. Good times.

I read everything on the bookshelf in my room, which were my mother's random accumulations throughout her life, so I read the whole of the Little House on the Prairie series by 2nd grade, Chronicles of Narnia by 3rd, Little Women in 4th grade (and I think Anne of Green Gables), Jane Eyre in 6th. Also a bunch of Christian missionary biographies, and every Christian teen self-help book my mother bought. The only two books that were completely immune from my grasping hands were Les Miserables and Brothers Karamazov, because those looked like they'd be pretty, well, miserable to get through. I tend to favor an escapist flavor in my recreational reading. I actually managed to burn out on Tom Clancy novels in 8th grade and haven't touched another one since.

Slightly off topic, I guess, but did anyone else who read fairly early, and fairly quickly have major problems with spelling? My 3rd-5th grade teacher had a theory that I had such issues with spelling tests because of that. I would just recognize the words, and never, ever need to sound them out, so I never did.

Actually, I'm the opposite. I'm a visual learner and I picture things movie style all the time - so once I've read a word, I tend to be able to picture it in my mind and also sound it out. Which combined to make impeccable spelling abilities for as long as I can remember. Always aced my spelling tests in school.
tenet |ˈtenit|
noun
a principle or belief, esp. one of the main principles of a religion or philosophy : the tenets of classical liberalism.
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a person who occupies land or property rented from a landlord.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Woopate » Mon Jul 12, 2010 11:29 am UTC

I started reading the year I entered school (kindergarden). They offered a sweet program where I could get a free pizza from Pizza Hut every time I read a book. Needless to say, I ate a lot of pizza. I read my first chapter book in grade 1, and my first book in excess of 500 pages in grade 2. I have been a voracious reader, (reading while walking, on the road, family reunions, pretty much everywhere).

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby Tricks Choices » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:33 pm UTC

I'm not sure when I began reading. All I know is that I read weirdly fast. And no, it's not skimming or anything of that silliness. I just read differently than most people. I remember finishing one of those American Girl Doll books (Molly Saves the Day? Happy Birthday Felicity?) in an extremely short period of time, and my mom legitimately accusing me of lying about it and quizzing me on random little tidbits from the book. Needless to say, I trounced her disbelief, seeing as I had just finished the book and it was fresh in my mind.

I never read books difficult for me until sometime a few years ago, though. I just read (read as past tense, I have less time now and I've slowed down) in mass quantity. I loved series because I could get tons at a time from the library and knock them all out in the next few days. I'm afraid I made things difficult for my English teachers, though. They couldn't exactly yell at me for reading in their class when I had already completed the reading we were supposed to be doing. I'm not to fantastic at focusing when I need to in class. I always rank my own projects as more important than coursework. Whoops.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby SpaceShipRat » Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:34 am UTC

My parents tell me I would ask them to read out words since I could say "wod!"

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby pineapplepie » Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:56 pm UTC

I wasn't really interested in reading until around age 5, in kindergarten, when I wasn't allowed to take naps with the other kids for fear of screwing up my sleep cycle. Before that, I knew how to read a bit, but wasn't really interested in books.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Fri Sep 03, 2010 3:02 am UTC

Woopate wrote:I started reading the year I entered school (kindergarden). They offered a sweet program where I could get a free pizza from Pizza Hut every time I read a book.


Book It! I remember doing the Book It program in 3rd Grade. Didn't last long, though, since not many students read enough books: the teacher didn't encourage us enough. He sort of handed them out privately to individual students, instead of telling the entire class about it. I remember the button was one of those moving-image buttons, where the book opened and closed as you moved the button back and forth, and when opened, a rainbow appeared. Each time you read the required number of books (I think was 5), you got a coupon for a free personal pan pizza with the purchase of a medium or large pizza. For each coupon you got a sticker on your button, and when you got 5 stickers, I think you got a free large pizza with up to 3 toppings.

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Re: Looks like we got ourselves a reader...

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:40 pm UTC

Through some mystery of the universe my 9 year old niece thinks reading is boring. She does seem to have some technical difficulties-like some level of dyslexia perhaps-but she just doesn't think it' an interesting way to spend time. I'm hoping to find that one magic story which will get her to want to keep going and going and going. It's been a long time since I was working in Children's Services at the library-got any suggestions?
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