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Posted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:17 pm UTC
by Arabella
I am reading Logic by Wilfrid Hodges. It is really interesting. But i got distracted by HP. i recently read The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera and You Shall Know Our Velocity by Dave Eggers.

Posted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 4:41 pm UTC
by Fluff
Elementary Nuclear Theory - Hans A. Bethe & Philip Morrison :shock:

Posted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 1:57 am UTC
by Sulla158
I'm reading Hey Nostradamus! by Douglas Coupland and The Mote in God's Eye by Niven and Pournelle. I'm also going to have to read Their Eyes Were Watching God for English class pretty soon but I'm procrastinating for as long as possible.

Posted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 6:39 am UTC
by platypus01
Just finished Antic Hay by Aldous Huxley, starting Graham Greene's Heart of the Matter. The latter for summer reading.

Posted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:36 pm UTC
by WhiteRabbit
I picked up Only Revolutions by Mark Z. Danielewski this weekend. I'm reading it on my lunch breaks since it is far too complicated to be reading when I can't bring my full attention to bear. I've also started on Against the Tide of Years, the second in a fun time travel/alternate history series.

Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:17 pm UTC
by Ren
I'm re-reading the "His Dark Materials" trilogy in preparation for movie-bashing with my friend Megan this winter.

I can't believe how long it's been since I read them!

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 3:41 am UTC
by Traisenau
I've finally got around to reading Misery by Stephen King, and am a fair ways into that. And after I finish it I'm gonna read The books of blood by Clive Barker.

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 6:39 am UTC
by I Zimbra
Sulla158 wrote:I'm reading Hey Nostradamus! by Douglas Coupland


Reading Douglas Coupland now is like talking to my exgirlfriends. I can remember why we went out, but I mostly remember why we broke up. Same with William Gibson.

I'm reading The Work of Charles & Ray Eames and re-reading Red Mars. It makes we want to terraform the shit out of something.

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 1:22 pm UTC
by Zohar
"Titan" by Ben Bova. Pretty cool.

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 5:44 pm UTC
by notyouravgjoel
I'm finishing up "Misquoting Jesus", and I will soon be starting "The Chalice and the Blade: Our History, Our Future".

I was referred to the latter by "Ishmael".

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:35 pm UTC
by bbctol
notyouravgjoel wrote:I was referred to the latter by "A truly awesome book which will affect my life philosophy forever".

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 3:14 am UTC
by Narsil
Just starting Anansi Boys, by Neil Gaiman. I want to read every Neil Gaiman book, having only read American Gods And only owning the former and latter, as well as Neverwhere. I still need to find Stardust, Good Omens, Smoke and Mirrors, and Fragile Things, especially for the story with Shadow in it.

Anansi Boys is very interesting. If American Gods was Lord of the Rings on Earth, in terms of being epic and dark, then this book is The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy on Earth, in terms of being zany and lighthearted. I like how he continues with his universe of gods that live among men, because there are so many possibilities there. And the way Gaiman writes, you feel like you're right there in a little house in Florida while Anansi himself weaves a tale for you, polishing it and making each character larger than life, yet wholly believable.

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 1:04 pm UTC
by bookishbunny
Rabit Redux by Updike. Not sure I like it. Rabit, Run left me with ambiguous feelings, and I like this one a little less.

Also, still reading Poisonwood Bible by Kingsolver.

Posted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:50 am UTC
by Pebbles
currently rereading Catch 22 by Joseph Heller and beginning my foray into The Sandman. Im about half way through the Preludes and Noctures. Its a fair amount of awesome.

Posted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:50 pm UTC
by bookishbunny
^^ I'm just now reading Sandman, too! And I'm at the same-ish spot.

Posted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 3:09 pm UTC
by william
Reading the Garden of Rama by Arthur C Clarke and Gentry Lee, and also Death Note.

Posted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 3:28 pm UTC
by existential_elevator
Life During Wartime, Call of Cthulu, Selected Papers in the Philosophy of Social Science...

Catch-22 is an awesome book, by the way...

Posted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 6:11 pm UTC
by Handsome
The Foundation series by Asimov and Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Posted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 12:24 am UTC
by Ptera
Kushiel's Justice by Jacqueline Carey

This is the fourth in this series, which I really love. It's epic fantasy, but from a first-person point of view, which I think makes it easier to get into than something like Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time (I only made it through the first five books, or so).

Posted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 4:59 am UTC
by Mother Superior
Handsome wrote:The Foundation series by Asimov and Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut


Just finished the first of the former and not the latter, sadly. The train ride was too short.

Posted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 2:45 pm UTC
by dagron
Just finished The Once and Future King by T.H. White. Haven't decided what to read next.

Posted: Sun Aug 26, 2007 1:06 pm UTC
by Narsil
As per recommendations of the fora, I picked up Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon.
I have no idea what the hell is going on, and I'm 30 pages into it.
But I do have the strangest feeling that the whole book is one extended phallic symbol.

Posted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:03 am UTC
by knight427
Read last week:
Ender's Game
Ender's Shadow
Shadow of the Hegemon
Speaker for the Dead
All by Orson Scott Card of course.

Now Reading:
At Risk by Stella Rimington

I needed a Sci-Fi break, but Xenocide and Shadow Puppets will be waiting for me at the library later this week.

Posted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:38 pm UTC
by Ren
I finished "The Satanic Verses" by Salman Rushdie.

Holy shit, guys. Holy shit.

That book is so, so, so awesome. Rushdie can write like no other.

Posted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:40 pm UTC
by bookishbunny
Ren wrote:I finished "The Satanic Verses" by Salman Rushdie.

Holy shit, guys. Holy shit.

That book is so, so, so awesome. Rushdie can write like no other.


I'm a bif fan. Did you read The Moor's Last Sigh?

Posted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:53 pm UTC
by lowbrass
So my ex introduced me to the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind. And man, they're awesome. I'm currently on the 8th one, Naked Empire.

Posted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 2:44 am UTC
by Narsil
I still have no idea what the hell Gravity's Rainbow is about.
I think I do, though.
At any rate, it's entertaining.

It's easy to see where the guy who wrote House of Leaves got his inspiration though. Of course, "got his inspiration", in this case, does in fact mean "hacked his writing style from".

I mean, right down to the oddly misspelled words? What the hell?

Posted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:44 am UTC
by Ren
bookishbunny wrote:
Ren wrote:I finished "The Satanic Verses" by Salman Rushdie.

Holy shit, guys. Holy shit.

That book is so, so, so awesome. Rushdie can write like no other.


I'm a bif fan. Did you read The Moor's Last Sigh?


Not yet. I've read Satanic Verses and Haroun and the Sea of Stories so far, and am working on acquiring the other ones.

Posted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 12:58 pm UTC
by bookishbunny
Ren wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:
Ren wrote:I finished "The Satanic Verses" by Salman Rushdie.

Holy shit, guys. Holy shit.

That book is so, so, so awesome. Rushdie can write like no other.


I'm a big fan. Did you read The Moor's Last Sigh?


Not yet. I've read Satanic Verses and Haroun and the Sea of Stories so far, and am working on acquiring the other ones.


I have Midnight's Children sitting on my kitchen counter. I hear it's one of his best.

Posted: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:28 pm UTC
by bbctol
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Damn, is that book fucking up my brain.

Posted: Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:32 pm UTC
by Cassi
I'm rereading His Dark Materials (on The Amber Spyglass now). Also slowly rereading Catch-22, but I never seem to be in the mood for it long enough to read more than a chapter or two at a time...

Posted: Thu Aug 30, 2007 7:43 pm UTC
by mrcheesypants
Just bought A Game of Thrones last night and loving it.

Posted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 3:00 am UTC
by dansez dansez dansez
Les Chants de Maldoror by Isidore Lucien Ducasse, le Comte de Lautréamont. It had a great influence on the surrealists and dadaists and to a lesser extent most 20th century literature, even though its relatively unheard of because its influence was somewhat indirect.

You see, Philippe Soupault discovered his book in a shop in 1917, and it inspired much of his writing, which in turn was influential in the two previously mentioned movements. And then these movements were influential on other later movements, so on and so forth.

Posted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 4:10 pm UTC
by Sandry
Finally got and have started Dorothy Sayer's Gaudy Night. Been meaning to read this for about a year. And thank heavens I have something to keep me company on the bus trip down to NYC.

I love books largely set at universities. Gives me nostalgia for an experience absolutely nothing like my own. :P

Posted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 4:39 pm UTC
by dubsola
Narsil wrote:Just starting Anansi Boys, by Neil Gaiman. I want to read every Neil Gaiman book, having only read American Gods And only owning the former and latter, as well as Neverwhere. I still need to find Stardust, Good Omens, Smoke and Mirrors, and Fragile Things, especially for the story with Shadow in it.

I've read everything except Sandman. Guess I probably should, given how much proper respect it's given here.

Posted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 4:52 pm UTC
by Cassi
dubsola wrote:I've read everything except Sandman. Guess I probably should, given how much proper respect it's given here.


You really should. I'd never actually read a comic book before that (yea, I know, shush everyone), and I wasn't sure about it, but I'd run out of Gaiman to read, so...

But yea, really good.

Re:

Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 12:45 pm UTC
by no-genius
no-genius wrote:trying to get past the introduction this time
Being and Nothingness by Satre.

I still haven't read this book - but at least I got past the introduction (which is very much like 30 pages).

will probably re-read the HH trilogy in four parts soon-ish

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 1:15 pm UTC
by Okita
Read "Making Money" by Terry Pratchett. Twas lovely, which was unfortunate since I spent 2 hours reading the damn thing instead of doing all the studying I needed to do, which meant that I was up at 3 in the morning catching up on work. But it was a good book.

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 2:15 pm UTC
by no-genius
Incidentally, I saw a book in a ... erm, bookshop once - a sci-fi book about a carpenter ? It sounds a bit house of leaves - ish. Does anyone think they've read that?

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 3:00 pm UTC
by bookishbunny
I don't remember that last books I posted, so:

I just finished A Severed Head by Iris Murdoch. It was pretty good, but all the characters are nuts. It's very soap-opera-y in its bed-hopping-ness.

I am now reading Rabbit is Rich by John Updike and Sanctuary by William Faulkner