Annoying words, and Words You Hate

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby SlyReaper » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:50 pm UTC

Incidentally, I die a little inside every time someone asks how "ghoti" is pronounced with a big smug grin on their face because they think I've never seen it before.

The answer is "fish" by the way. Which is wrong. The ti would only be a sh if there were other letters after it, and the gh would only be a f if there were letters before it.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:23 pm UTC

And the o only sounds like i if it's in the word "women".

So basically it fails everywhere.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Halebit » Tue Dec 29, 2009 7:26 am UTC

I've always despised the word throughly just because I can never seem to spell it right, plus it just doesn't flow for me :S

Just because where I live it seems to be uttered every 5 seconds: Creep and it's derivatives are also out of favor with me.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Bobber » Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:12 pm UTC

Halebit wrote:I've always despised the word throughly just because I can never seem to spell it right...
Maybe you can't spell it right because you're not even sure how it's pronounced. if you knew it was pronounced "thoroughly", you might realize that all you were missing was the first "o" in the word.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Lazar » Wed Dec 30, 2009 10:07 pm UTC

SlyReaper wrote:Incidentally, I die a little inside every time someone asks how "ghoti" is pronounced with a big smug grin on their face because they think I've never seen it before.

The answer is "fish" by the way. Which is wrong. The ti would only be a sh if there were other letters after it, and the gh would only be a f if there were letters before it.

And quite amusingly, the Klingon word for fish is ghotI'. ;)
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Brickman1444 » Thu Dec 31, 2009 4:14 am UTC

I hate the ratio of vowels to consecutive consonants in the word eighths. 2/5

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby TheGrammarBolshevik » Thu Dec 31, 2009 4:56 am UTC

That doesn't bother me one tenth as much as the fact that it forces you to stick different kinds of front-of-the-tongue consonants together like that. "Sixths" is even worse.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Grop » Thu Dec 31, 2009 10:36 am UTC

Yes, I can't say this -ths thing, and I struggle with sixth.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby PM 2Ring » Fri Jan 01, 2010 6:13 am UTC

Grop wrote:Yes, I can't say this -ths thing, and I struggle with sixth.

That sound & similar ones aren't easy for French speakers. But even many native speakers have problems with "sixth". Eg, my step-father doesn't even try, he just says "sixt".

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Sheikh al-Majaneen » Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:38 am UTC

SlyReaper wrote:Incidentally, I die a little inside every time someone asks how "ghoti" is pronounced with a big smug grin on their face because they think I've never seen it before.

The answer is "fish" by the way. Which is wrong. The ti would only be a sh if there were other letters after it, and the gh would only be a f if there were letters before it.

After studying farsi for about six months, I would have pronounced it in a way that doesn't have sounds in the english language, and I would have been right (btw as far as I know it doesn't mean anything). ghoti = fish? what moron came up with that piece of faux-clever waste of time?

But to contribute to the thread, I hate the word "superfood."

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby viscusanima » Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:49 pm UTC

I hate the words 'green', 'eco-' and the phrase 'environmentally friendly'. Note I only hate green and eco- in particular contexts - i.e. using them to describe anything that isn't harmful to the environment. It seems they've all become massive buzzwords lately, with companies flocking to add them to their products etc. The thing that made me want to cry was listening to Gordon Brown's speech at the Labour Party Conference and hearing him saying that they were going to create x amount of 'new, green jobs'. I almost committed seppuku right there and then.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby emceng » Wed Jan 27, 2010 6:32 pm UTC

I don't know if it was mentioned before 'cosplay'. I loathe it. Reading it is like nails on a chalkboard or crying babies. I have nothing against people dressing up and having fun. I just wish that word could be removed forever.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby chridd » Thu Jan 28, 2010 6:16 am UTC

emceng wrote:cosplay

Am I the only person who sometimes pronounces this "cosine play" in my head?
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby bluestripe » Thu Jan 28, 2010 7:29 pm UTC

Demonstrative

Its like we purposely chose the most awkward pronunciation just to torture ourselves.

That and i-anything.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Jan 28, 2010 8:01 pm UTC

bluestripe wrote:Demonstrative

Its like we purposely chose the most awkward pronunciation just to torture ourselves.

If by "chose the most awkward pronunciation" you mean "followed the general rules we use for most words when adding affixes to them", then yes, I agree.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby bluestripe » Thu Jan 28, 2010 10:11 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
bluestripe wrote:Demonstrative

Its like we purposely chose the most awkward pronunciation just to torture ourselves.

If by "chose the most awkward pronunciation" you mean "followed the general rules we use for most words when adding affixes to them", then yes, I agree.


Haha, yes.

I work as an ESL tutor. Words like this are quite a source of frustration.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Ouch.jars » Fri Jan 29, 2010 11:58 am UTC

PM 2Ring wrote:
Grop wrote:Yes, I can't say this -ths thing, and I struggle with sixth.

That sound & similar ones aren't easy for French speakers. But even many native speakers have problems with "sixth". Eg, my step-father doesn't even try, he just says "sixt".


I don't try either, and say "six-uth".
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby yokdvd » Tue Jun 01, 2010 4:29 am UTC

"juxtaposition" seems like the most useless and malphonic word I can think of. I have never seen it used in a context where the writer couldn't have simply chosen a different, more direct wording. To me, the use of "juxtaposition" usually says little more than 'look at how many uncommon words I know!'
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby xepher » Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:55 pm UTC

I don't care if it has been adapted into the English language. If you pronounce jalapeno (which should be pronounced hal-uh-payn-yo) as jalapeno (hal-uh-peen-o), you deserve to die. At least MOST people have got past jalapeno (jal-uh-peen-o) and tortilla.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Bobber » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:00 pm UTC

When my family pronounces jalapeño, the first phoneme is /x/.
As for tortilla and paella, those ll's? /l/. And it's a light /l/ because we're Danish, not a dark /l/.
Grating is not the word.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby oldyellr » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:11 pm UTC

And how should English speakers pronounce tequila? I've always pronounced just like it's written, but I've heard some people pronounce it with the "L" silent, claiming that's the correct way.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby oldyellr » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:15 pm UTC

Back to words I hate...

I hate the way Hollywood people, and it seems most North American media, pronounce Robin Hood, like it's one word, with emphasis on the first part. Where did that come from?

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby PM 2Ring » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:37 pm UTC

oldyellr wrote:Back to words I hate...

I hate the way Hollywood people, and it seems most North American media, pronounce Robin Hood, like it's one word, with emphasis on the first part. Where did that come from?

Maybe it's in imitation of manhood, neighbourhood, etc. Or maybe Hollywwood just does it to make it sound different and "medieval". To my ears, it's weird because that emphasis pattern makes Robin sound adjectival, whereas I expect Hood to be adjectival. After all, Hood is supposed to be his nickname, not his family name.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:49 pm UTC

oldyellr wrote:And how should English speakers pronounce tequila? I've always pronounced just like it's written, but I've heard some people pronounce it with the "L" silent, claiming that's the correct way.
They're wrong. It's only got one L, which is pronounced in Spanish as it is in English.

PM 2Ring wrote:To my ears, it's weird because that emphasis pattern makes Robin sound adjectival
Actually, stressing "robin" over "hood" makes it sound like a compound, rather than adjective+noun. Much the same way that "orange bowl" is pronounced when it means a bowl for oranges, as opposed to the adjectival use meaning a bowl which is colored orange.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby PM 2Ring » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:55 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Actually, stressing "robin" over "hood" makes it sound like a compound, rather than adjective+noun. Much the same way that "orange bowl" is pronounced when it means a bowl for oranges, as opposed to the adjectival use meaning a bowl which is colored orange.

Ok, that makes sense.

I wonder if any dialects of English commonly use the reverse emphasis pattern for things like "orange bowl".

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Aiwendil42 » Tue Jun 01, 2010 7:46 pm UTC

I hate the rampant tendency to coin 'cute' portmanteaus for things. 'Frenemy', 'staycation', and the like are all rather vile.

I also find the use of French words in cases where there are perfectly good English words rather annoying, even in instances where it's very common. For example, cul-de-sac where 'dead end' would do just fine, or fiance in place of the perfectly good 'betrothed'. But then I still haven't really gotten over the Battle of Hastings and the whole Norman invasion.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Iulus Cofield » Wed Jun 02, 2010 2:38 am UTC

No kidding! I don't like the -ess suffix either, but that's not nationalism so much as a preference for keeping gender out of English.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Bobber » Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:46 am UTC

Is a cul-de-sac just a dead end? Doesn't it imply that there is a round-about at the end which leads back to the opposite lane on the same road, leading you back?
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby eSOANEM » Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:50 am UTC

Grop wrote:Yes, I can't say this -ths thing, and I struggle with sixth.


Try saying sixths now, flicking the tongue the dental position and back is good fun. :D

oldyellr wrote:And how should English speakers pronounce tequila? I've always pronounced just like it's written, but I've heard some people pronounce it with the "L" silent, claiming that's the correct way.


Said people are wrong. If it was tequilla they would be more right, the closest sound in English to Spanish <ll> is /j/ so their pronunciation of it [tekija] is close to the way a (certainly Castillian) Spanish Speaker would pronounce tequilla which would be [tekiʎa]. That said, as it is a single l it should be pronounced like the English l so [tekila].

Aiwendil42 wrote:or fiance in place of the perfectly good 'betrothed'.


Fiance(e) does give distinction between a male and female betrothed in writing though. That said, there aren't going to be many situations when you'll need to specify that.

Bobber wrote:Is a cul-de-sac just a dead end? Doesn't it imply that there is a round-about at the end which leads back to the opposite lane on the same road, leading you back?


Not always a roundabout, but often a bulge so that you can turn around.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Iulus Cofield » Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:55 am UTC

In PNW American usage at least, being a region without widespread use of roundabouts, cul-de-sac is as you described, but without the island in the middle. Dead ends are any road that terminate and they can actually stretch on for miles and miles.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby SlyReaper » Wed Jun 02, 2010 10:16 am UTC

I think most people would prefer to describe their street as a cul-de-sac than a dead end.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Velifer » Wed Jun 02, 2010 12:38 pm UTC

Grop, Try the tongue twister: "The sixth sheik's sixth sheep is sick."

Cul-de-sac brings to mind castration. Certainly there's been some heavy borrowing of French and every other language English bumps into, but when authors angeben mit foreign words it's quite annoying. It even pissed off Desiderius Erasmus, who parodied it in Μωρίας Εγκώμιον. Makes the author sound like a pretentious 阴 茎. Even worse when they get a translation wrong.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Grop » Wed Jun 02, 2010 12:44 pm UTC

SlyReaper wrote:I think most people would prefer to describe their street as a cul-de-sac than a dead end.


And yet they could use impasse, which sounds much better to me. Ok, there's something silly about this statement.

Velifer wrote:Grop, Try the tongue twister: "The sixth sheik's sixth sheep is sick."


Ah, horror, panic! :lol:

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Aiwendil42 » Wed Jun 02, 2010 2:00 pm UTC

I think most people would prefer to describe their street as a cul-de-sac than a dead end.


I grew up on one, and "dead end" is what we always said.

Is a cul-de-sac just a dead end? Doesn't it imply that there is a round-about at the end which leads back to the opposite lane on the same road, leading you back?


Hmm - I've heard people use cul-de-sac for dead ends in general. I suppose if its meaning were in fact restricted in the way you suggest, that would make its existence somewhat justified. Though still I'd prefer to follow Tolkien's little joke and call them "bag ends".

Incidentally, I always thought that "roundabout" referred to a traffic circle (as a type of highway intersection), not to the little circle in a cul-de- . . . er, bag end.

Fiance(e) does give distinction between a male and female betrothed in writing though.


True, but then there are tons of foreign words with gender distinctions that we don't have in English.

I don't like the -ess suffix either, but that's not nationalism so much as a preference for keeping gender out of English.


I agree completely. I always use 'actor', for example, whether I'm talking about a man or a woman. For that matter, I've never understood the need for distinct 'best actor' and 'best actress' categories. I mean, is the skill of being an actor really so different from the skill of being an actress that they aren't commensurable? How is that any less ridiculous than having separate 'best director' and 'best directress' categories?

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby oldyellr » Wed Jun 02, 2010 2:14 pm UTC

Aiwendil42 wrote:

Fiance(e) does give distinction between a male and female betrothed in writing though.


True, but then there are tons of foreign words with gender distinctions that we don't have in English.

So is that an excuse to eliminate words with gender distinctions in the name pf Basic Human Decency? Does it mean that all those foreign languages are politically incorrect and it's time they changed? In my opinion, gender distinction serves a useful descriptive purpose.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:36 pm UTC

oldyellr wrote:In my opinion, gender distinction serves a useful descriptive purpose.
It's bad enough we don't know what pronouns to use with some unknown person, without also being confused as to how to refer to their profession. Whatever useful descriptive purpose is served by including the gender of a person when you talk about their job is more than outweighed by the inconvenience of being *required* to specify their gender when doing so. It's so much easier to just say "servers" instead of "waiters and waitresses", for example.
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Aiwendil42 » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:50 pm UTC

So is that an excuse to eliminate words with gender distinctions in the name pf Basic Human Decency? Does it mean that all those foreign languages are politically incorrect and it's time they changed? In my opinion, gender distinction serves a useful descriptive purpose.


That's not what I was saying at all. My point was that if providing gender-specificity were sufficient reason to adopt a foreign word in place of an English one, then we would end up with very few English words left - at least, words referring to people.

But since you bring it up, yes I am in favour of gender-neutral words wherever possible. And yes, I do find something slightly distasteful about languages that use, for example, different words for the same occupation depending on whether the referent is male or female. But I'd say that in English, because words don't have grammatical gender, such cases are both more obtrusive and more avoidable than in many other languages.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby oldyellr » Wed Jun 02, 2010 6:08 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:It's so much easier to just say "servers" instead of "waiters and waitresses", for example.

That's quite true. It's also much easier to say "actors" instead of "actors and actresses". However, it really irks me when the media refers to actresses as "actors" in an attempt to conceal gender for the sake of Basic Human Decency or some feminist agenda. When you hear a word you want to picture what is being described in your mind, not some anonymous, genderless blob.

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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby Makri » Wed Jun 02, 2010 6:37 pm UTC

However, it really irks me when the media refers to actresses as "actors" in an attempt to conceal gender for the sake of Basic Human Decency or some feminist agenda.


Be happy they allow you that! While it may annoy you in the singular, be glad you don't have to suffer what German speakers do in the plural: ridiculous conjunctions "Xes and Xesses"... (Or, if it is to be gender-neutral in the singular, a disjunction: "X or Xess") A single gender-neutral word form is pure luxury! :mrgreen:
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Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Postby oldyellr » Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:17 pm UTC

Makri wrote:
However, it really irks me when the media refers to actresses as "actors" in an attempt to conceal gender for the sake of Basic Human Decency or some feminist agenda.


Be happy they allow you that! While it may annoy you in the singular, be glad you don't have to suffer what German speakers do in the plural: ridiculous conjunctions "Xes and Xesses"... (Or, if it is to be gender-neutral in the singular, a disjunction: "X or Xess") A single gender-neutral word form is pure luxury! :mrgreen:

As it happens, the language I grew up speaking is eastern European with all that gender stuff and all nouns having suffixes instead of using prepositions. However, it's completely phonetic, so nobody needs to learn spelling as in English. :D


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