Suburbs accents ?

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Iv
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Suburbs accents ?

Postby Iv » Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:45 am UTC

Hi there.

I was taking the Parisian subway yesterday and overheard a (loud) discussion between two people behind me. They were speaking in French with what we call here the accent of the suburbs cities. It uses a tonic and aggressive-sounding tone, a slightly different slang, some abbreviations. It is common place here. It is not a dialect, it is just a way of speaking that is slightly different and easily recognizable. I guess they find the tone with which other people speak as arrogant in the same way we find their aggressive. I realized that I knew people that were talking this way in other suburb cities of France.

It is not regional or specific to Paris region, people near Marseille manage to have both the meridional and the suburbs accent. It seems to be more specific to a rebellious attitude against a low social condition. I wondered if such accents existed as well in the English-speaking world or in <language of choice>-speaking world ?

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SpitValve
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby SpitValve » Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:54 pm UTC

I'd say we have something like that in New Zealand. There's definitely a different accept in lower socio-economic suburbs, no matter where you are in the country. It may influenced by having a larger proportion of Maori and Pacific Islanders in lower socio-economic conditions, but I hear pakeha (white NZers) talking like that too.

It's almost like your accent is related to your "class", which is kinda sad because NZ isn't supposed to have a class sytem...

Here's an example for the movie Once Were Warriors - the, and one from One Network News for comparison. (Though obviously in the film Once Were Warriors they're trying to sound like gang members and Judy Bailey on One Network News has had vocal training, so the differences are probably exaggerated)

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steewi
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby steewi » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:25 am UTC

The three Australian accents (the status of which are being challenged a bit now) are not particularly geographical, but rather represent a combination of urban/rural distinction, education and class. There are other factors, but it's quite complicated, and somewhat arbitrary, these days.

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liza
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby liza » Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:47 am UTC

I suppose standard American English and AAVE are analogous (or at least comparable) to that situation, nay?

Edit: note for non-Americans: AAVE is typically more of a sociolect than an ethnolect. In case anyone was wondering.
Last edited by liza on Sun Jul 06, 2008 1:13 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby cjskim@gmail.com » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:35 pm UTC

In London we definitely have that. In posher areas, you'll hear people speak with posh accents (think of the Queen). In certain neighbourhoods, you'll hear less "educated" accents (think of cockneys or Ali G).

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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby SpitValve » Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:30 pm UTC

cjskim@gmail.com wrote:In London we definitely have that. In posher areas, you'll hear people speak with posh accents (think of the Queen). In certain neighbourhoods, you'll hear less "educated" accents (think of cockneys or Ali G).


I think Canadians sound more like Americans than Londoners sound like Londoners...

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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby Robin S » Sat Jul 05, 2008 12:43 pm UTC

cjskim@gmail.com wrote:In London we definitely have that. In posher areas, you'll hear people speak with posh accents (think of the Queen). In certain neighbourhoods, you'll hear less "educated" accents (think of cockneys or Ali G).
Also, London is large enough that there are recognizably different accents from different parts. For example, accents from the East End are more similar to the local Essex accent, and very different from areas like Croydon (nearer to where I live).
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Hurduser
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby Hurduser » Sat Jul 05, 2008 3:33 pm UTC

In Germany, we do have such accents. I think they are annoying and should be a criteria for whom to put on the B-ark :D
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby Moobly » Sat Jul 05, 2008 5:25 pm UTC

My impression from time spent in the states is that various cities, i.e. Chicago, Boston, and Atlanta, all had their own accent and the people in the suburbs had much lesser versions of said accent.

In Ireland, it's a mess. A guy from 3 miles down the road is likely to have a different accent, and his neighbour another still. And God help you if you're headed toward Dublin.
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Re: Suburbs accents ?

Postby gibberishtwist » Sun Jul 06, 2008 1:12 am UTC

Moobly wrote:My impression from time spent in the states is that various cities, i.e. Chicago, Boston, and Atlanta, all had their own accent and the people in the suburbs had much lesser versions of said accent.

In Ireland, it's a mess. A guy from 3 miles down the road is likely to have a different accent, and his neighbour another still. And God help you if you're headed toward Dublin.


The major American cities definitely have unique accents, and I can tell you from living in Boston that people in neighboring towns have their own dialects too. Somerville, for instance: One town over from Boston, but townies from Somerville will have a slightly different Boston accent than people from Watertown or Arlington, etc. Don't even get me started on the south; When I was working there I occasionally needed a fellow employee to serve as translator for me.
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