Confusion using predictive text.

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deepgrave
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Confusion using predictive text.

Postby deepgrave » Tue Jul 15, 2008 8:54 pm UTC

One of the main shortfalls of predictive text as I've seen it used, other than obscure proper nouns, is the existence of words which are "spelled" with the same number sequence. I've taken to calling these "homonums" because I think I'm so damn clever. :lol:

Cases in which both options are of the same frequency, especially with very common short words, such as '63' which gives "of" or "me" and '43' which gives "if" or "he", lead to a lot of somewhat garbled sentences that interfere with communication. Even more amusing are longer words that happen to line up (such as "primal" and "spinal") and cases with many words of middle-ish frequency ("came", "band", "acne", "cane", "bane" are all homonums).

I don't know what I'm trying to say really other than I find these amusing and an absolutely unique linguistical feature of text messaging, and I wonder if there's a more efficient texting system coming out in the future (are full keyboards on phones a good replacement? they look so small and susceptible to typos).

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Robin S » Tue Jul 15, 2008 9:00 pm UTC

There are some more advanced systems, though I'm not sure whether any are implemented on phones. I have seen one where once part of the word was typed, a list of possible next letters (or complete words) would appear, with the more common ones larger. Or something like that. I don't remember the details; it was a couple of years ago.
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seladore
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby seladore » Tue Jul 15, 2008 9:40 pm UTC

The iPhone keyboard is interesting. You type as normal (the touchpad keys are maybe 4mm square. Small, anyway.), and the phone automatically corrects mistakes resulting from miss-hit keys.

I was surprised, when I first tried it, to find how accurate it was. I guess it does all kinds of cleaver weighting of possible words, and ands up suggesting the right one nearly all the time.


Also, well done on homonums.

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby steewi » Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:48 am UTC

I've considered that it could be a useful type of simple code - type words with the right numbers but wrong letters (say, one further around than it should be, recursing back to the beginning).

Thus "Meet me at the bridge" becomes "nffu nf bu uif csgehf". That's just a simple replacement cipher, but you could make it more complicated by replacing throwing forward the variation from the previous letter.

For example, m is 6(+0). It's the first letter, so it doesn't change. The (+0) is thrown forward to the next letter. E is 3(+1). The (+1) is thrown forward to the next letter, and the previous letter's variance (+0) is applied. The result is e. The next letter (e) has (+1) applied, making it f, and the +1 is thrown forward to the next letter. T becomes u.

Result "mefu me bt thf csgfge". The change in the replacement cipher is enough to beat a statistical analysis before using scary maths. The key isn't particularly safe, but it's certainly good enough for arranging a secret meeting with a mistress.

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SpitValve
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby SpitValve » Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:06 am UTC

I think I've had something like "Is if good?" for "Is he home?"

Usually if it's a couple of words I can figure it out without much effort, but occasionally the whole sentence loses its meaning...

Though people in Canada don't appear to really text much anyway.

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby GhostWolfe » Thu Jul 17, 2008 12:19 am UTC

good/home/gone give me the most trouble. Oh, and have/hate... especially when you're typing fast because you're angry!

Seems like most of the touch phones use the same system as PDAs, you start the word and it offers suggestions towards what you might mean.

I did have a "mobile" phone with a qwerty keyboard, I became very adept at two-thumb typing, but it makes the phone a little unweildy.

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby kellsbells » Thu Jul 17, 2008 12:59 am UTC

There was a particularly hilarious mixup with my friends due to "Asian" and "Brian" being homonums (genius, by the way). I always take the time to make sure everything's right when I'm texting, but my sister never glances down when she texts me, so her messages are always entertainingly cryptic: "Meet if at good later?"
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby liza » Thu Jul 17, 2008 1:19 am UTC

First off, words like "high" that are composed of all or mostly the same number are painful.
Second, I was typing "novocaine" and it suggested "novorolsky". Which is not a word at all. Silly Cupertino effect.
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby SpitValve » Thu Jul 17, 2008 10:33 am UTC

kellsbells wrote:There was a particularly hilarious mixup with my friends due to "Asian" and "Brian" being homonums (genius, by the way). I always take the time to make sure everything's right when I'm texting, but my sister never glances down when she texts me, so her messages are always entertainingly cryptic: "Meet if at good later?"


My friend had a group of friends where "Brian" as the only Asian in the group. Eventually they just started writing "So, is Asian coming over?"

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby zomgmouse » Fri Jul 18, 2008 9:31 am UTC

games:hands
movies:mother
"Alf Todd," said Ukridge, soaring to an impressive burst of imagery, "has about as much chance as a one-armed blind man in a dark room trying to shove a pound of melted butter into a wild cat's left ear with a red-hot needle." P.G. Wodehouse

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby PaulT » Fri Jul 18, 2008 1:39 pm UTC

'Smirnoff' is homonumeric(?) with 'poisoned'. That's the longest pair I know of. Doubtless not the longest there is though.

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BrainMagMo
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby BrainMagMo » Tue Jul 22, 2008 7:50 pm UTC

According to the Wikipedia article on predictive text, these are called textonyms, but I prefer homonums (or homonumerals, mayhaps?)

The article also says the that these are txtonyms:
22737 = acres bards barer bares barfs baser bases caper capes cards carer cares cases

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Piper » Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:12 am UTC

PaulT wrote:'Smirnoff' is homonumeric(?) with 'poisoned'.


Pure brilliance.

my homonums tend to not even be words, as I am allergic to the predictive on my phone. As a result people end up having to go through a list of what I might have meant, it can get quite embarrassing at times

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby rho » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:31 pm UTC

'Cider' and 'cheer'. One leads to the other - albeit fleetingly.
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Leah
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Leah » Sun Aug 03, 2008 11:15 pm UTC

I was going to try not to lower the tone, but I don't think that can be avoided. All I can say is once my friend rang me to tell me she had just sent a text to her boyfriend and forgotten to change a word. Kick > Lick.

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Kaienne » Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:35 am UTC

Leah wrote:I was going to try not to lower the tone, but I don't think that can be avoided. All I can say is once my friend rang me to tell me she had just sent a text to her boyfriend and forgotten to change a word. Kick > Lick.

I can only imagine what sort of hilarious outcome became of that.

ara
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby ara » Fri Aug 08, 2008 1:23 am UTC

Yes, I've had many bad and sometimes embarrassing outcomes come of this. It gets so annoying, especially when one is trying to type a very important or emotional message. Ahhh the confusion...

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Amoeba
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Amoeba » Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:58 pm UTC

52839 = Latex. Second (and desired) option is Katey. Hilarity sometimes ensues.
Jesus Christ you have confused me

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ConMan
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby ConMan » Tue Aug 26, 2008 6:58 am UTC

It often amused me when SMSing the word "prank" (used to refer to ringing someone's phone and hanging up in order to leave a "missed call" notice) that after the first four keys were pressed it predicted "span", leading me to mentally add the expected next letter.
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Notch » Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:30 pm UTC

Here in Sweden, we often call our buddies ("polare", slang) smokers ("rökare").

Oh, and +1 for homonums.

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Kizyr » Tue Aug 26, 2008 2:18 pm UTC

deepgrave wrote:I've taken to calling these "homonums" because I think I'm so damn clever. :lol:

Homonums! Now I need to figure out how to work that into a normal sentence without sounding silly. It is pretty clever, though. KF
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby Simplex » Wed Aug 27, 2008 11:04 am UTC

Ooh, homonums, I like it.

So..... who wants to hate sex?

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ConMan
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby ConMan » Mon Sep 01, 2008 4:01 am UTC

I learned on the weekend that some friends of mine refer to the city of Adelaide as "Afflbife", that being what predictive text supplies as the first option. At least half of the Google searches for this word seem to use it in the same context.
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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby not unreal » Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:03 pm UTC

I wrote a Python script to analyze a wordlist to find homonums. The script and its results, sorted by length, are attached.
Attachments
homonums.zip
Python script for finding homonums, with a text file of results
(37.78 KiB) Downloaded 84 times

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby darktalon » Thu Sep 04, 2008 12:04 am UTC

The Facebook group "Drunken text appreciation society" mentions these. A personal favourite is "still outside the club. fucking steve" - should of course have been "queue". :lol:

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Re: Confusion using predictive text.

Postby LittleKey » Thu Sep 04, 2008 3:22 am UTC

by the way, when you said you weren't sure about full phone keyboards being worth it? i think they are, i have an Env2 (verizon) and as long as i'm paying attention, i don't typo enough for it to be an issue. But I used to have a Razr V3. My god, the predictive text (itap, on the razr) was terrible. It puts "b" instead of "a", and "g" instead of "i".


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