Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby jaap » Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:31 am UTC

sir2you wrote:Is there a word (verb) that means slander or belittle but begins with the letters im?

Impugn?

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby tastelikecoke » Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:22 am UTC

Imperil?

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Velifer » Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:22 pm UTC

impugn? Gah. Slo-mo ninja!
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby sir2you » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:41 am UTC

Impugn is what I was looking for. It was bugging me =P Thanks
„‹•**•›„„‹•*„‹•**•›„„‹•*„‹•* "There are two ways to live your life; as if nothing is *•›„„‹•**•›„*•›„„‹•**•›„*•›„
*•›„*•›„„‹•**•›„*•›„„‹•**•›„ a miracle, or as if everything is a miracle." - Einstein „‹•*„‹•**•›„„‹•*„‹•**•›„„‹•*

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby MrPeg » Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:34 pm UTC

Argency wrote:The word I've been looking for for years means, "a pure, cleansing fire". I swear I first read it in the Thomas Covenant books, but I've reread them and I always get to distracted by the plot to keep an eye out for it...

It's not nessecarily a religious word, although it could easily be used in a religious context. I really really need to know that word. The hellish bit is that I think I remembered it once, years ago, and then forgot it again almost immediately, but I can't be sure that I didn't just dream that. This word is my unicorn.


Massive necropost but do you mean "Caamora"?

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Aightynine » Wed Aug 01, 2012 2:20 am UTC

Is there a word for the sort of anxious/delusional over-reaction which most people would be tempted to call "paranoia"? I ask this because I'm pretty sure that paranoia is technically a psychological disorder and thus shouldn't be thrown around willy-nilly, especially by people like me who are not psychologists. (Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about this.)

I'll give an example of the sort of thing I mean. Let's say I've been extremely fatigued for about a week, even though I've been getting plenty of sleep. I mention it to someone, who says something like, "Oh, I was like that when I had mono." Even after looking up mononucleosis and realizing that I don't quite have ALL of the symptoms, it takes a blood test for me to be truly convinced that I don't have it. (Yes, this did happen to me once, more or less.)

For medical-specific stuff, "hypochondria" comes to mind, but like paranoia this also seems to be something that technically you're supposed to be diagnosed with. Anyway, I'd be interested in a more general word. Or am I stuck with "over-reaction"?
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Wed Aug 01, 2012 3:31 am UTC

Wikipedia says this in the article on paranoia:
Historically, this characterization was used to describe any delusional state.[citation needed] In modern colloquial use, the term "paranoia" is sometimes misused to describe a phobia.[citation needed] The general lack of blame in phobia disorders sharply differentiates the two.[citation needed] In other words, fearing that something bad or harmful might happen does not in itself imply paranoia. Rather, with paranoia there is an irrational fear of malice by others (excepting rare cases of schizophrenia).

So perhaps "phobia" might be a good word, but I'm not sure if you can call someone "phobic" without a prefix.

This can also be used as a medical term though, but in cases like this and "paranoia" I think it's best to think of the words having two definitions, one strict and medical, and the other loose and colloquial. I think technical words are often co-opted for more colloquial use precisely because no previously existing word filled that niche.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Rhyme » Fri Aug 24, 2012 12:08 am UTC

Is there a word for when someone goes out of their way to compliment something of others they themselves are/possess?

Such as when someone, having recently bought a new car, points out other cars of the same type in a positive way. Can be done either seriously or as a joke (the latter is more common that I have seen) but I've yet to figure out what to call it. Some sort of indirect narcissism; could likely apply to the actual person as well as their possessions. ("What a lovely name" said to someone with whom the name is shared; this being known to the other person is optional.)

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby eSOANEM » Fri Aug 24, 2012 7:50 am UTC

I don't know if there's a specific word, but I'd say it's a type of "fishing for compliments".
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby lazyhorse » Wed Sep 12, 2012 1:40 am UTC

Hi All,

I am wondering if a work exists to describe any genetic condition in humans that only becomes apparent post reproduction and hence is not 'bred' out of existence?

Shaun

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:11 am UTC

"Old age" is probably the best catch-all.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby eSOANEM » Thu Sep 13, 2012 6:50 am UTC

People can be affected by old age even without reproduction.

I have doubts such conditions exist. For one thing, they'd have to be only found in women (the only way for the body to distinguish sex and masturbation from reproduction is if it gets pregnant) which is unusual because most congenital conditions are more prevalent amongst/only affect men.

If such conditions do exist however, I suspect they don't have a single-word common name. Instead they probably have a medical description which covers them all. Something along the lines of "congenital post-natal ____" for instance.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby poxic » Thu Sep 13, 2012 6:57 am UTC

"Recessive" is as close as I can think of. A woman can be a carrier of (e.g.) hemophilia that would usually only show up in male offspring, making her a carrier of the condition but not a sufferer of it.

Wait, that isn't what recessive means, is it? Or maybe it is. Use with caution.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Thu Sep 13, 2012 8:28 am UTC

eSOANEM wrote:People can be affected by old age even without reproduction.

I have doubts such conditions exist. For one thing, they'd have to be only found in women (the only way for the body to distinguish sex and masturbation from reproduction is if it gets pregnant) which is unusual because most congenital conditions are more prevalent amongst/only affect men.

If such conditions do exist however, I suspect they don't have a single-word common name. Instead they probably have a medical description which covers them all. Something along the lines of "congenital post-natal ____" for instance.

I'm assuming that by post-reproduction he means post-reproductive age. A lot of diseases crop up after our reproductive prime, so it seems like a much more likely question.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:08 pm UTC

eSOANEM wrote:People can be affected by old age even without reproduction.

I have doubts such conditions exist.
Yeah, I'm pretty certain the poster meant post-all-reasonable-possibility-of-reproduction, in which case there are many such conditions, all of which together constitute senescence. I don't know if there's a word for the specifically genetic aspects of this, though.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby eSOANEM » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:18 pm UTC

Derp. Got completely the wrong end of the stick there :roll:
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby bigglesworth » Fri Sep 14, 2012 1:10 am UTC

It seems to be a linked concept to the "selfish gene", in that it is an example of a gene that remains without utility to the organism but not causing detriment during the period of selection (pre-reproduction).
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Iulus Cofield » Fri Sep 14, 2012 12:53 pm UTC

The question made me immediately think of Huntington's disease, which normally doesn't appear until the mid 30's and has nothing to do with senescence. It's one of those illnesses that makes theodicy difficult, especially considering it's a dominant gene.

I'm not sure if there's a specific term for that, Shaun, but if I had to coin one I'd probably go with "sleeper gene".

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Carlington » Wed Sep 19, 2012 8:24 pm UTC

Mazuku wrote:
Word for today
Epicaricacy {ip-p-carri-r-c}: Deriving joy from the misfortunes of others.

Schadenfreude.
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doogly: Hands waving furiously.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Qaanol » Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:54 am UTC

Relatedly, if we look at the words meaning “X at the Y of Z”, where the values can be:
X = Happiness or Unhappiness
Y = Benefit or Detriment
Z = Oneself or Another

Then we have the following 8 categories:

Happiness at one’s own benefit = Pride / Exhilaration
Happiness at another’s benefit = Mudita
Happiness at one’s own detriment = Masochism
Happiness at another’s detriment = Schadenfreude / Epicaricacy
Unhappiness at one’s own benefit = Shame / Unworthiness
Unhappiness at another’s benefit = Jealousy / Envy
Unhappiness at one’s own detriment = Sadness / Self-pity
Unhappiness at another’s detriment = Empathy / Sympathy

Is there a more common synonym of “Mudita”?
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby eSOANEM » Thu Sep 20, 2012 8:27 am UTC

Qaanol wrote:Is there a more common synonym of “Mudita”?


I'd probably have gone with "vicarious pride" or "vicarious happiness". I guess you could also go with "pride by proxy" or somesuch if you wanted :lol:
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby jobriath » Thu Sep 20, 2012 3:10 pm UTC

Mazuku wrote:I remember coming across an obsure word which translates as "Your neighbour's house is on fire" but for the life of me, I cannot recall what that word was.

Ooo! Ooo! I know this one! A neighbour whose house is on fire is a ucalegon. S'only the flipping best obscure word.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Qaanol » Fri Sep 21, 2012 11:38 pm UTC

Rhyme wrote:Is there a word for when someone goes out of their way to compliment something of others they themselves are/possess?

I’ll propose “Forehanded compliment”, since we don’t seem to have a term for it already. This can cover not only complimenting others for things the speaker also possesses as you describe, but also extolling the virtues of an opponent you have just defeated, and complimenting one’s audience on their good sense/taste/intelligence. Can also be “forehand compliment”.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Tirian » Sat Sep 22, 2012 7:33 pm UTC

This is probably a simple one, but I'm too close to see it.

When a boss praises her subordinates, we might say that she is fostering or engendering a pro-social culture in her team. But what would we say her effect is in the opposite case when she criticizes her subordinates in public? "Attacking" or "threatening" doesn't feel like a proper antonym for nurturing. Right now my paper has "failing to foster", but I'm certain there's a single word out there that's going to scratch this linguistic itch.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Deva » Sat Sep 22, 2012 8:10 pm UTC

Discourage? Prevent? Inhibit? Obstruct? Impede? Deter?
Changes its form depending on the observer.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby poxic » Sat Sep 22, 2012 8:22 pm UTC

Making a toxic environment? Sabotaging? Undermining?
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Tirian » Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:23 pm UTC

Ah, better suggestions, all of them. Undermine, I choose you!

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:35 pm UTC

Humiliating could also work.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Fri Sep 26, 2014 3:15 am UTC

There needs to be a word for nostalgia for things you haven't actually ever experienced. For example, sometimes I get a nostalgic feeling for games that I've never played.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Bloopy » Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:09 pm UTC

http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-c ... px?Id=8719
Today, it is argued, we no longer need to have lived a past in order to feel nostalgic for it (Chase & Shaw 1989). Baker and Kennedy (1994) draw a distinction between 'real’ nostalgia, nostalgia for some remembered past time, and 'stimulated’ nostalgia, a form of vicarious nostalgia evoked from stories, images, and possessions (Belk 1988; Stern 1992).

Not that it would hurt to come up with a specific word for the vicarious kind.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Angua » Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:58 pm UTC

Spoiler:
Image
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby mathmannix » Tue Sep 30, 2014 1:36 pm UTC

Angua wrote:[dinosaur comics]


Did T-Rex mean courtier?
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Derek » Wed Oct 01, 2014 2:07 am UTC

Well I'm glad to know I'm not alone in this feeling :D

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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Envelope Generator » Thu Oct 23, 2014 12:42 pm UTC

Is there a formal botanical word for the little nubs that detach from (salted) peanuts and collect in the bottom of the bag?
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Sizik » Thu Oct 23, 2014 2:48 pm UTC

From what I can tell, it's either the germ or the radicle.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby Eugo » Sat Apr 25, 2015 9:19 pm UTC

I have an opposite problem - about words I'm sure exist (as in "found them in the dictionary") but can't remember seeing them in actual use. Here's a few.

Singular of data. Data is plural; datum would be singular (or I've learned different Latin). But in places where I'd expect datum to appear, "piece of information" is used instead. In places where datum does appear, it means a reference point for altitude measurement (e.g. on planets without seas).

Permille. Exists in dictionaries as an open secret known to practically nobody. Even those who I expect would know the word don't use it, because they think their text should be understood by majority of its readers. Instead, "one tenth of one percent" (and, mind you, never "a tenth of a percent", and of course they never say of which percent...).

Nape. The definition I found was "back of the neck", exactly the word I was looking for. Never saw it used except in sentences like "the hairs of the nape of his neck stood up" (which is another extremely long translation of "naježio mu se potiljak"). If nape is "back of the neck", then "nape of the neck" would be... what "back of the back of the neck" or "back of the neck of the neck"? Talked to a few natives and they didn't have a clue, they took this for granted and didn't sound like they thought this had, required or merited an explanation.

Well, I'm asking the experts then.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby eSOANEM » Sat Apr 25, 2015 10:48 pm UTC

Datum isn't really used because data is a mass noun now rather than a plural form except in formal writing and a few pretentious people's speech. I don't really understand why cartographers use datum that way though, it is a mystery.

I do see nape occasionally. Specifically it's the base of the back of the neck. It's used particularly with animals like cats where mothers will pick their young up by the nape of the neck (the paralysing reflexes related to this can be helpful for vets). I'm not sure I've ever heard it without "of the neck" there so I guess it's not really much of a word in its own right.
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby ahammel » Sat Apr 25, 2015 10:57 pm UTC

eSOANEM wrote:Datum isn't really used because data is a mass noun now rather than a plural form except in formal writing and a few pretentious people's speech. I don't really understand why cartographers use datum that way though, it is a mystery.
Wikitionary tells me that "datum" is Latin for "given", perhaps as in "given an arbitrary line on this map, we can make a coordinate system based on how far things are away from it".
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby bigglesworth » Sat Apr 25, 2015 11:05 pm UTC

Eugo wrote:"the hairs of the nape of his neck stood up" (which is another extremely long translation of "naježio mu se potiljak")
"He got goosebumps" or "he got goosebumps on his neck"
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Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Postby The Fantasist » Sun Apr 26, 2015 2:45 am UTC

Is there a word for sad and beautiful?


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