Term for when words look wong?

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

sinsofangels
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:05 pm UTC

Term for when words look wong?

Postby sinsofangels » Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:10 pm UTC

Hi, I was just wondering if anyone knew what the term is (if there is one) for when you look at a correctly spelled word you've seen a hundred times before and suddenly it looks weird or wrong?

arpee
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:30 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby arpee » Mon Oct 11, 2010 11:55 am UTC

a pseudovitiation

User avatar
Iulus Cofield
WINNING
Posts: 2917
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:31 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Iulus Cofield » Mon Oct 11, 2010 3:14 pm UTC

About 0 results (0.28 seconds)

User avatar
kcaze
Posts: 57
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 2:23 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby kcaze » Wed Oct 13, 2010 9:09 am UTC

Yeah, pseudovitation doesn't seem to be a word unless that was a joke.

By the way, Iulus, I just noticed your post was at 3.14 pm :P By the way, is there a way to display seconds in the time-stamp?

User avatar
Felstaff
Occam's Taser
Posts: 5181
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:10 pm UTC
Location: ¢ ₪ ¿ ¶ § ∴ ® © ™ ؟ ¡ ‽ æ Þ ° ₰ ₤ ಡಢ

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Felstaff » Wed Oct 13, 2010 12:36 pm UTC

Temporal Lexical Discognizance
Lexical Discord/ance
Lexical Anamorphosis
Cognitive Lexical Dissonance
Temporal Dyslexia
Temporal Dysgraphia
Temporal Dyslexemia
Anti-cryptomnesia
Anabethonance/bethonance/disbethonance
Discordant Phoneme
Periodic Glossal/Anomic Aphasia
Periodic Pure Word Deafness/Blindness

Those are all ones I made up, where I tried to find the right combination of words to describe the condition. "The infrequent inability to recognise a recognisable/common word, once it has been repeated too often". Periodic dyslexia/dissonance/dis-cognizance covers the first part of that sentence. I like anabethonance. Bethonance, apparently, means "recognising a link between words only after they have been pronounced". However, it doesn't quite fit as the condition only one word is involved, and the inability to recognize it as written or spoken. It's a toughie, and lots of people have asked the question. Even the Meaning of Liff doesn't have a word for it! Temporal Phonemical Dysgraphia may fit, as dysgraphia is a condition of not able to write a word (due to recognition), despite being able to speak it. I made up "dyslexemia" as opposed to using dyslexia, as it is a well-recognised persistent condition. Periodic Partial Aphasia seems to fit best

Edit: Found it! Or something similar, anyway. Semantic Satiation.
Away, you scullion! you rampallion! You fustilarian! I'll tickle your catastrophe.

User avatar
waltwhitmanheadedbat
Posts: 98
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 10:45 am UTC
Location: Yes.

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby waltwhitmanheadedbat » Thu Oct 14, 2010 10:29 am UTC

I've also heard it called Jamais Vu. The above page references Felstaff's term as a more precise usage.

User avatar
Magnanimous
Madmanananimous
Posts: 3491
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:11 pm UTC
Location: Land of Hipsters and Rain (LOHAR)

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Magnanimous » Thu Oct 14, 2010 10:45 am UTC

I Googled "pseudovitation", and the only result was this thread. That's kind of funny in a sad way.

Moose Hole
Posts: 398
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:34 pm UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Moose Hole » Thu Oct 14, 2010 3:42 pm UTC

I think it's called alexia.

User avatar
chridd
Has a vermicelli title
Posts: 846
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 10:07 am UTC
Location: ...Earth, I guess?
Contact:

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby chridd » Thu Oct 14, 2010 9:02 pm UTC

kcaze wrote:By the way, Iulus, I just noticed your post was at 3.14 pm :P By the way, is there a way to display seconds in the time-stamp?
Yes. User control panel > Board preferences > Edit global settings (probably already selected) > My date format: Custom, then type something like "D M d, Y g:i:s a" (the s is the important part here). That particular post was at :55 seconds.

Moose Hole wrote:I think it's called alexia.
That sounds like it's more permanent than what the OP is talking about.

I'm somewhat surprised that no one has, when looking at the thread title, pointed out that a word could look weird or wrong because it's actually not spelled correctly.
~ chri d. d. /tʃɹɪ.di.di/ (Phonotactics, schmphonotactics) · she · Forum game scores
mittfh wrote:I wish this post was very quotable...

User avatar
Iulus Cofield
WINNING
Posts: 2917
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:31 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Iulus Cofield » Thu Oct 14, 2010 10:58 pm UTC

That's possible, but I have and I have heard anecdotally from several other people that they have done as OP described.

User avatar
Sizik
Posts: 1261
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 3:48 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Sizik » Fri Oct 15, 2010 5:49 pm UTC

chridd wrote:I'm somewhat surprised that no one has, when looking at the thread title, pointed out that a word could look weird or wrong because it's actually not spelled correctly.


I suppose they suffered from the opposite effect, where wrong words look correct.
she/they
gmalivuk wrote:
King Author wrote:If space (rather, distance) is an illusion, it'd be possible for one meta-me to experience both body's sensory inputs.
Yes. And if wishes were horses, wishing wells would fill up very quickly with drowned horses.

User avatar
Velifer
Posts: 1132
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2007 4:05 pm UTC
Location: 40ºN, 83ºW

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Velifer » Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:08 pm UTC

Semantic satiation?
Only thing making that phrase better than any other is that it has a Wikipedia entry and was used in an dissertation.

I U Lusco Field wrote:...anecdotally...

I didn't pull the dissertation, but there's real research on this. It's not just me!
Leon Jakobovits James wrote:"Many other names have been used for what appears to be essentially the same process: inhibition (Herbert, 1824, in Boring, 1950), refractory phase and mental fatigue (Dodge, 1917; 1926a), lapse of meaning (Bassett and Warne, 1919), work decrement (Robinson and Bills, 1926), cortical inhibition (Pavlov, 192?), adaptation (Gibson, 1937), extinction (Hilgard and Marquis, 1940), satiation (Kohler and Wallach, 1940), reactive inhibition (Hull, 19113 [sic]), stimulus satiation (Glanzer, 1953), reminiscence (Eysenck, 1956), verbal satiation (Smith and Raygor, 1956), and verbal transformation (Warren, 1961b)."

But even the researcher didn't quite know what to call it.
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies have nothing to lose but their chains -Marx

BAMN
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:01 pm UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby BAMN » Sun Oct 17, 2010 1:07 pm UTC

I prefer "jamais vu" (Fr. "never seen"), which was already mentioned. This phrase neatly links this phenomenon to another two, which are closely related: "deja vu" (Fr. "already seen") and "presque vu" (Fr. "almost seen").

Of course, deja vu is when something seen (or more generally, experienced) for the first time appears strangely familiar. And presque vu is that tip-of-the-tongue feeling where the word (or whatever) is just out of reach.

I've left off the accents deliberately -- I can't be bothered typing them in.

fictiveLaark
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:57 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby fictiveLaark » Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:12 am UTC

I just have to share a story about this subject. In the 8th grade for English class we had to pick a new word every week and complete some assignment I can't remember now. One week I picked the word "None," and I swear I almost got booted out of the accelerated English class into special ed.

"You've never seen this word in a book before?"
"None of them."
"You never used it in a conversation?"
"None I can remember."
"Can you pronounce it for me?"
"...non-ee?"

Derek
Posts: 2181
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2010 4:15 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Derek » Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:59 am UTC

I've had that happen to me before, though I can't recall what the words were at the time. I can say that for a long time I never made the connection between "segue" and [sɛgweɪ]. I knew what both of them meant, but thought "segue" was pronounced [sɛg] and [sɛgweɪ] was spelled "segway". It took awhile for me to realize my mistake.

User avatar
Ortus
Fluffy
Posts: 569
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 7:09 am UTC

Re: Term for when words look wong?

Postby Ortus » Wed Dec 22, 2010 6:30 am UTC

Iulus Cofield wrote:That's possible, but I have and I have heard anecdotally from several other people that they have done as OP described.


I do this a lot, though sometimes changing font can help. I experience what the OP describes less aurally than with written word, but it still happens that way, too. 'Awaits', in particular, makes me angry when I look at it. It's just.... wrong.

I also tend to completely forget words I've used 10's and 100's of times. Presque Vu, I think has been mentioned? I'll straight up name synonyms and antonyms of the word until I can figure out which particular word I was trying to use. I'll literally try to trigger any sort of response to remember the word I was trying to use. It's agonizing, at times, and can cause me embarrassment in vocal debate/discussion/presentation/just talking with people I don't know well.

Edite: Novel is giving me particular trouble at the moment. Damn, but it does look wrong.
roband wrote:Face, yes. Chest, probably. Pubic area, maybe. Scrotum, not a fucking chance.


Return to “Language/Linguistics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests