Confusing Slang

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

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chishm
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Postby chishm » Sun Jun 24, 2007 9:21 am UTC

I use "footpath" for concrete walking areas that tend to be long and narrow. I use "bike path" for the ones made of asphalt.

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Postby GMontag » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:02 pm UTC

xooll wrote:
Jarrad wrote: the lack of understanding about the difference between BBQing and Grilling.

What's the difference? I'm a new yorker, we know not such things.


Grilling is when you fry something on a grill or a griddle. Hence "grilled cheese sandwich" or "grilled chicken burger". BBQing is roasting, and takes *much* longer. Basically its the difference between the food getting cooked from contact with hot metal, or with hot air. The end result of BBQing is also heavily dependent on what you're burning (i.e. wood chips, charcoal, etc.).

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Postby German Sausage » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:17 pm UTC

we say 'zed' too! lets be friends!
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Postby chrispy1 » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:32 pm UTC

chrispy1 wrote:This is British, so the Brit/Aussie folk reading this probably won't think anything of it, but for years (literally most of Junior school and High School) I carried around my Random House Collegiate Dictionary to prove that words like "realise" etc. were legit, and that being Canada, we should be spelling with the "s" and not the "zed".


I hope you were meaning me. Because I like friends, and you seem like a cool person. Seeing your name reminds me I'm hungry. Damn. :D
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Narsil
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Postby Narsil » Sun Jun 24, 2007 2:51 pm UTC

GMontag wrote:
xooll wrote:
Jarrad wrote: the lack of understanding about the difference between BBQing and Grilling.

What's the difference? I'm a new yorker, we know not such things.


Grilling is when you fry something on a grill or a griddle. Hence "grilled cheese sandwich" or "grilled chicken burger". BBQing is roasting, and takes *much* longer. Basically its the difference between the food getting cooked from contact with hot metal, or with hot air. The end result of BBQing is also heavily dependent on what you're burning (i.e. wood chips, charcoal, etc.).
In America, BBQing is simply pouring copious amounts of barbecue sauce on something.
Yes it's very wrong.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

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Postby gmalivuk » Sun Jun 24, 2007 4:26 pm UTC

GMontag wrote:
xooll wrote:
Jarrad wrote: the lack of understanding about the difference between BBQing and Grilling.

What's the difference? I'm a new yorker, we know not such things.


Grilling is when you fry something on a grill or a griddle. Hence "grilled cheese sandwich" or "grilled chicken burger". BBQing is roasting, and takes *much* longer. Basically its the difference between the food getting cooked from contact with hot metal, or with hot air. The end result of BBQing is also heavily dependent on what you're burning (i.e. wood chips, charcoal, etc.).


Does this go for steak as well? (In your variety of English?) When I hear grilled steak, I think of steak cooked in the normal way, which is on a barbecue grill over something solid that is on fire. If you talk about barbecued steak, I would think something like Narsil and assume there was a barbecue-type sauce being used.

This is of course completely different from having a barbecue, which really means drinking beer and eating potato salad while waiting for allegedly fire-making men to get the grill lit so we can actually have the burgers/steaks/sausages eventually.
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Postby bigglesworth » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:19 pm UTC

Well when it's stake cooked on a grill, it's flame grilled steak, because you're getting the smoky flavour. Other types are just stake. If you put a stake on a BBQ, it's a BBQ steak. I'm not sure the nomenclature is so different.
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Jarrad
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Postby Jarrad » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:54 pm UTC

Narsil wrote:
GMontag wrote:
xooll wrote:
Jarrad wrote: the lack of understanding about the difference between BBQing and Grilling.

What's the difference? I'm a new yorker, we know not such things.


Grilling is when you fry something on a grill or a griddle. Hence "grilled cheese sandwich" or "grilled chicken burger". BBQing is roasting, and takes *much* longer. Basically its the difference between the food getting cooked from contact with hot metal, or with hot air. The end result of BBQing is also heavily dependent on what you're burning (i.e. wood chips, charcoal, etc.).
In America, BBQing is simply pouring copious amounts of barbecue sauce on something.
Yes it's very wrong.


No no, see that would be Grilling.

BBQ is a smoking process which takes hours.

One never Barbeques a steak, you grill a steak, a hamburger, hotdogs, or a chicken breast. You barbeque ribs, brisket, whole turkeys, sausage, etc.

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Narsil
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Postby Narsil » Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:00 pm UTC

Then how do they get Barbecue Chips?
Now you see my point.
Spoiler:
EsotericWombat wrote:MORE JUNK THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR

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Vandole
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Postby Vandole » Sun Jun 24, 2007 9:07 pm UTC

chrispy1 wrote:Spelling anything with an -ize as -ise. This is British, so the Brit/Aussie folk reading this probably won't think anything of it, but for years (literally most of Junior school and High School) I carried around my Random House Collegiate Dictionary to prove that words like "realise" etc. were legit, and that being Canada, we should be spelling with the "s" and not the "zed".

Actually, both ways are UK English (See here).

Also, the bathroom/washroom/restroom thing always irritated me. I use bathroom for a room that actually contains a bath, else it is a washroom. However, apparently most Americans use washroom to mean the room with the washing machine in it (I call that the laundry room) and restroom for the toilet and sink.

What do you use: Couch, sofa or chesterfield? I get some strange looks, even from fellow Canadians when I use couch, so I don't think it's a nationality thing. Just curious.
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Postby gmalivuk » Sun Jun 24, 2007 10:09 pm UTC

Vandole wrote:Actually, both ways are UK English (See here).


The OED is not necessarily a good source of dialect differences, as it will list all accepted spellings. It also has plenty of specifically non-British definitions, as it tries hard to be a comprehensive dictionary of the Eglish language, not a comprehensive dictionary of British English. (Look up truck, trunk, and sidewalk, for instance.)

apparently most Americans use washroom to mean the room with the washing machine in it (I call that the laundry room) and restroom for the toilet and sink.


No, the room where I do my laundry is the laundry room. The rooms where I can take a shit are bathrooms, regardless of whether they have a bath therein. (A half bathroom is a "bathroom" that only has the toilet and sink, no shower or tub.)

What do you use: Couch, sofa or chesterfield?


It's generally a couch, sometimes a sofa. Never an ottoman or a chesterfield. One with only two seats is a loveseat, though.
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Postby Joeldi » Sun Jun 24, 2007 11:51 pm UTC

What about lounge chair?
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

roc314 wrote:America is a police state that communicates in txt speak...

"i hav teh dissentors brb""¡This cheese is burning me! u pwnd them bff""thx ur cool 2"

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bigglesworth
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Postby bigglesworth » Mon Jun 25, 2007 4:10 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:No, the room where I do my laundry is the laundry room. The rooms where I can take a shit are bathrooms, regardless of whether they have a bath therein. (A half bathroom is a "bathroom" that only has the toilet and sink, no shower or tub.)


You shit in half a bath?

So sorry, but the mental image came up, and I want to ruin everyone else's day. :twisted:
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Postby MFHodge » Mon Jun 25, 2007 5:07 pm UTC

I use couch and sofa interchangably. If it has a fold-up bed in it, then it is a sleeper sofa and the thing in it is a sofa bed. If it seats two, it is a Love Seat. The thing sitting in front of it that you put your feet on is an ottoman.

The word toilet just sounds crude. In a house, it's a bathroom (regardless of if there is a bath there). In a public place, it's a restroom.

And please, never call it a "John". God I hate that.
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Postby Joeldi » Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:13 am UTC

Toilet. sounds. crude?

To me it brings up images of of white porcelain and cleaning products. A toilet is what it is.
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

roc314 wrote:America is a police state that communicates in txt speak...

"i hav teh dissentors brb""¡This cheese is burning me! u pwnd them bff""thx ur cool 2"

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hermaj
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Postby hermaj » Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:35 am UTC

My mum, no matter where she is, calls it the ladies'. That is completely fine when we are out and there are mens' and ladies' toilets, but when we're at home it irks me. We only have one bathroom! It is not designated to any particular sex.

Anyway, here we call it lots of things. Toilet, bathroom, loo... there are also lots of people that refer to the euphemised action rather than the place. "I'm going to take a leak", "I'm going to see a man about a horse", "I'm off to powder my nose" (I didn't know anyone said that any more but my mate's new girlfriend did when we were out and it was adorable. I felt bad that we could barely hear each other and I had to point to show here where to go) and my dad's favourite and one he's been at me to share with you lot, "putting Percy to the porcelain".

We are a pretty strange bunch of people. :D

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Postby GhostWolfe » Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:55 am UTC

hermaj wrote:"I'm going to see a man about a horse"


Also known as "seeing a man about a wallaby"
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Postby pollywog » Tue Jun 26, 2007 4:28 am UTC

hermaj wrote:"I'm going to see a man about a horse"

I use this when I want to go somewhere and not have anyone follow me. Like if I wanted to go and talk to someone in private or something. I shall use this expression in Australia no longer.
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Postby CitizenErased » Tue Jun 26, 2007 6:03 am UTC

SilverWolfe wrote:
hermaj wrote:"I'm going to see a man about a horse"


Also known as "seeing a man about a wallaby"


And dropping the kids off at the pool :wink:

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Postby |333173|3|_||3 » Wed Jun 27, 2007 6:49 am UTC

I use "back in a moment" to mean that I am going to the toilet, or simply that I am going somewhere and don't wish to be followed.

A pavement is a footpath attached to a road, which may be called a foot path, but one which is separate from a road is always a footpath except in urban areas, where it is a lane or alley. The black stuff put on roads is tarmac (even when it technically is asphalt), short for tarred MacAdam.

TO me, lolly means a hard sweet on a stick, but the general practice in
Adelaide is to call all sweets except chocolate lollies.

A sofa is my preference, but I have found that I use sofa for one in a civilised area and couch for one in the common room or somebody's room. A chesterfield is simply one brand of sofa.

A vending machine is simply a vendo, unless it is a drinks machine.

I prefer Lorry, but have to use truck to avoid confusion. i do prefer Ute for pick-up truck though.

sometime students studying useless degrees (such as arts apprecitation) are referred to, along with their degrees, as B.Ark.s)

Rugger/Rugby is rugby union, league is rugby league.

go a ****** refers to getting a supplementary exam on medical grounds when not actually sick, named after the doctor who is usually used to get the doctors certificate.

foo me means provide me with a foo, for example "coffee me" or "knife me" ( I have heard this used)

for rhyming slang we have Seppo -> septic tank -> yank -> US citizen
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Postby Pebbles » Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:04 am UTC

VTHodge wrote:
Pebbles wrote:pffft sweets/candy.. its lollies! haha

So "lollies" is all candy. Not just candy on a stick? My mind is blown!


lollies is all confectionary except for chocolate.. which are chocies.
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Postby MFHodge » Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:17 pm UTC

CitizenErased wrote:And dropping the kids off at the pool :wink:

[url=http://xkcd.com/c168.html]Image
I'm still waiting for a chance to use 'I have to see a man about a horse'.[/url]
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Postby Akira » Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:46 pm UTC

Couch: I've always used couch, but my grandmother often calls it a "davenport", which she explained to me is actually a brand name? It amused me when we drove past a Davenport University one day.

Soda, pop, coke. I use them interchangeably.

MMMMMMM. Brisket. <3 Brisket. I love BBQ and grilled food, but BBQ tops all.

However, I ask that someone explain the difference between Mexican and Texmex? Please? I am ashamed to not know the specific difference when I was born in Texas.

And I'm out of relevant comments.
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Postby gmalivuk » Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:50 pm UTC

Akira wrote:However, I ask that someone explain the difference between Mexican and Texmex? Please? I am ashamed to not know the specific difference when I was born in Texas.


Mexican is food from Mexico. TexMex is food from Texas, which is fairly similar but not the same as Mexican food. It has also likely been far more influenced in the past 100 years or so by other American food conventions.

(One thing I've noticed here is how much less experimental Mexicans seem to be with their food. This is how gramma did it, this is how I do it. If you wonder what it would taste like to use yellow cheese in a taco, you're doing it wrong.)
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Postby zenten » Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:59 pm UTC

I once watched an hour long documentary on the BBQ, that involved lots of people getting very angry for someone not using their pet definition. They listed four.

I just stick to the one they use up here, and just use "smoking" and "cooking over a fire" to refer to the other two. The fourth one appeared to be just using a particular kind of sauce, which is just dumb to me, because it doesn't even taste like what I would refer to as BBQ sauce.

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Postby H.E.L.e.N. » Sat Sep 08, 2007 5:41 am UTC

Vandole wrote:I can't think of any slang I have that's particular to Canada. I do have intornets slang; I tend to randomly mispronounce words on purpose and say "poon" and "nub" a lot. (pwn and noob, I just like mispronouncing noob)


The pronunciation of "pwn" is "pone," to rhyme with "own." (I realize this is arbitrary, 'cept "poon" has a different slang meaning.)

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Postby gmalivuk » Sat Sep 08, 2007 3:08 pm UTC

helen wrote:
Vandole wrote:I can't think of any slang I have that's particular to Canada. I do have intornets slang; I tend to randomly mispronounce words on purpose and say "poon" and "nub" a lot. (pwn and noob, I just like mispronouncing noob)


The pronunciation of "pwn" is "pone," to rhyme with "own." (I realize this is arbitrary, 'cept "poon" has a different slang meaning.)


Fair enough, though I will continue to contend that pwnt is pronounced, "poont".
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Postby H.E.L.e.N. » Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:34 pm UTC

Is that past tense? The nerds I know just say pwned (rhymes with owned).

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Postby gmalivuk » Sun Sep 09, 2007 1:53 am UTC

helen wrote:Is that past tense? The nerds I know just say pwned (rhymes with owned).


You're right, pwned is the past tense. pwnt, on the other hand, is the past participle. I pwned you vs. I have pwnt you. :-)
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Postby dubsola » Mon Sep 10, 2007 2:05 pm UTC

stuck wrote:Rhyming slang is awesome

Trouble and Strife = wife
Dead Horse = Tomato Sauce
Dog's Eye = Pie

etc etc

djn beat me to it, but:
"Let's have a butchers"->"Let's have a butcher's hook"->"Let's have a look";
"This is a load of pony"->"This is a load of pony and trap"->"This is a load of crap"

I wish I knew more.

Narsil wrote:Cockney anything is awesome.

Man! So I moved to London last year, the language here (not just Cockney) is awesome. Particularly with the young kids. They have me laughing till I cry.

"Slow down, blud" and "Slow down, cuz" -> slow down, you.;
"They got bare pies"-> They have many pies;
"Your chest"->I commend you;
"Bruv"->mate, or pal, typically at the end of a sentence;
"jokes"->funny, as in "this is jokes";
"waste"->bad, as in "that girl is waste";
"shanked", "murked"->beaten badly, in a game, or any other competitive... thing;
"gwan"-> go on, originally from Caribbean slang;
"nutter"->crazy person;
"slag"->slut (ahem, excuse me);
"zoot"->marijuana cigarette;
"I got lenged"->I got very intoxicated.
I'm sure you're all familiar with what "Video Nasty" means.

I also like Caribbean slang - "ya dun kno" - you DO know! "Batty" - homosexual. "Bun" - burn.

Another thing that is particularly Cockney: hot pie and mash places that have live eels.

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Postby gmalivuk » Mon Sep 10, 2007 2:53 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:"zoot"->marijuana cigarette;


I'm guessing that is originally derived from the American zoot suit, thankyouverymuch.
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Postby Rusty » Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:15 pm UTC

liza wrote:
ArchangelShrike wrote:Maybe on "zee," and "ach" (H). I've met a Brit that pronounces "H" as "ha-ch" as in "hate."


Really? I though 'aytch' was universal.

It's because of the Aitch Equilibrium. There are a set number of aitches in the world to be used in speech, but some of these are dropped (as in, "I 'ad a right 'hard time in that 'istory exam, 'ow about you, 'Arry?"). These aitches soon pile up and before long attach themselves to unwitting Midlanders, who turn "aitch" into "haitch", and Scots, who turn "which" into "hwich"

Vandole wrote:What do you use: Couch, sofa or chesterfield?

How about "settee", which, despite sounding like a person who has been set, is interchangeable with "sofa" in everyday speech? I've always presumed it's a fairly widespread word, but since it hasn't been mentioned so far maybe it's fairly local. I only use "couch" in the term "couch potato", and up until this thread the only meaning for "chesterfield" I could have come up with was a small town in Derbyshire, or the football team thereof.

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Postby Titus » Fri Sep 14, 2007 10:40 am UTC

VTHodge wrote:And please, never call it a "John". God I hate that.


It's like calling the Tesla Coil the Nicola Coil. Albert's Theory of Relativity? Why associate the inventor's first name with the contraption?
The name "Crapper" has been soiled enough without dragging John through it...

You are welcome in advance for the mental picture.

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Postby nicelittledoggy » Tue Sep 18, 2007 6:51 am UTC

Vandole wrote:What do you use: Couch, sofa or chesterfield?

How about "settee", which, despite sounding like a person who has been set, is interchangeable with "sofa" in everyday speech? I've always presumed it's a fairly widespread word, but since it hasn't been mentioned so far maybe it's fairly local. I only use "couch" in the term "couch potato", and up until this thread the only meaning for "chesterfield" I could have come up with was a small town in Derbyshire, or the football team thereof.[/quote]

Chesterfield is really a style of couch, I think. (Also an old brand of cigarettes (American.)) Sofa and couch seem interchangable, just a matter of taste, except for that sleepersofa or sofa-bed thing. To me settee seems to be a particular kind of thing to sit on -- not as cushy as a couch, perhaps? Divan is another one, applies to a particular type of couch.

When I was in kindergarten, a new girl entered our class halfway through the school year, who called a couch a Davenport; we didn't know what she meant, thought she was very weird. But I've heard that Davenport for couch refers to Davenport, Iowa, which was a center of furniture mass-production sometime last century. So I've been told, anyhow.
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Postby nicelittledoggy » Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:00 am UTC

Has anyone heard the word "ownage"? Some teenage boys of my acquaintance define this as the state of owning, ie, being superior (at some endeavor, I suppose.) They're likely to exclaim this the way we used to say "far out" as well.
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Postby evilbeanfiend » Tue Sep 18, 2007 11:17 am UTC

yes ownage or pwnage very much comes from online gaming communities, you must be teh 5uxx0rz not to know that :wink:
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Postby Rilian » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:24 pm UTC

ArchangelShrike wrote:Poll: Soda or Pop?


Pop

or coke

Rilian
Posts: 496
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:33 pm UTC

Postby Rilian » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:26 pm UTC

chishm wrote:I use "footpath" for concrete walking areas that tend to be long and narrow. I use "bike path" for the ones made of asphalt.


footpath = dirt path through grass, in my imagination. side-walk = concrete.

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mrorange
Something from Reservoir Dogs, perhaps?
Posts: 587
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:46 am UTC
Location: frozen butthole of nowhere, Alaska

Postby mrorange » Wed Sep 26, 2007 1:10 am UTC

it's interesting living in alaska because we're so far west there's no real accent and thus no accent affiliated slang. People from the contiguious united states look confused when we say "outside" in refrence to where they're from. also the "lower 48" is very common.

"we went outside for christmas vacation" "oh yeah where'd you go?" "oregon"

we have guests up from the lower 48


those are the only alaska centric ones i can really think of. as far as the rest of the questions go. sofa if its fancy, couch if its in your basement/tv room. soda for sugary drinks or just by brand name. candy for candy chocolate is a kind of candy. chips are made of thinly sliced fried potatoes, And a bike path is an asphalt construction separated from the road for riding bikes, there are precious few sidewalks and those are interchangeably bike paths or sidewalks, depending on if you are walking or biking.
Truth be told/If I can be so bold/Your sig did inspire/What here did transpire/So that you would me admire/cause me to aspire/to greater heights/of lyrical plights.
-ThorFluff
BomanTheBear wrote: but then i started playing rugby and breakdancing.

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SpitValve
Not a mod.
Posts: 5130
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:51 am UTC
Location: Lower pork village

Postby SpitValve » Wed Sep 26, 2007 11:18 am UTC

mrorange wrote:it's interesting living in alaska because we're so far west there's no real accent and thus no accent affiliated slang.


That's the second time I've heard an American say they have no accent...

Dude, you have an accent. You have an American accent.


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