12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

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KrazyerKate
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby KrazyerKate » Sun Nov 29, 2009 12:17 am UTC

Jeff_UK wrote:3. How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?
Spoiler:
about 6 billion, Depending on your definition of 'Piano Tuner.' Someone who attempts to tune pianos but doesn't call themselves a piano tuner, surely is one, and equally, someone who calls themselves a piano tuner but never gets any work is still a piano tuner. Therefore, is not someone who does not call themselves a piano tuner AND has never had the opportunity to tune a piano still a piano tuner?



I went at this in a more serious way, but still came to a similar answer: My answer depends on how many tuners you need. If Google plans to install one Grand Piano in each of it's facilities, there are probably two or three tuners per city. If Google plans on expanding into the music industry, it'd probably better to use their computer expertise and automate the process, requiring only a couple human tuners to make sure the machines are doing the job right. If, say, Pianos become sentient and decide to kill all humans that are of no use to them, we could train everyone to tune pianos (except deafs, amputees, and other people obviously not able) given a year or two.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby DrSir » Mon Nov 30, 2009 2:39 am UTC

KrazyerKate wrote:
Jeff_UK wrote:3. How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?
Spoiler:
about 6 billion, Depending on your definition of 'Piano Tuner.' Someone who attempts to tune pianos but doesn't call themselves a piano tuner, surely is one, and equally, someone who calls themselves a piano tuner but never gets any work is still a piano tuner. Therefore, is not someone who does not call themselves a piano tuner AND has never had the opportunity to tune a piano still a piano tuner?



I went at this in a more serious way, but still came to a similar answer: My answer depends on how many tuners you need. If Google plans to install one Grand Piano in each of it's facilities, there are probably two or three tuners per city. If Google plans on expanding into the music industry, it'd probably better to use their computer expertise and automate the process, requiring only a couple human tuners to make sure the machines are doing the job right. If, say, Pianos become sentient and decide to kill all humans that are of no use to them, we could train everyone to tune pianos (except deafs, amputees, and other people obviously not able) given a year or two.


Because as they kill us, it would certainly be wise to make sure they are musically sound.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Gelsamel » Mon Nov 30, 2009 11:38 pm UTC

1. How many golf balls can you fit in a school bus?
Spoiler:
Perhaps you could measure the displacement of water of a water filled bus and an air-filled bus (sealed) and the volume difference between the displacement divided by the standard volume of a gold ball would indicate how many balls would fit


2. How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?
Spoiler:
During normal hours you should charge a standard rate per window that follows some sort of exponential curve dependant on the size of the window (Larger windows becoming exponentially more expensive to clean). It's unlikely that you'd be hired to clean windows outside of normal hours but if you were you would just charge a typical overtime rate or 1.5/2 depending on the time. This would make it less likely people would hire you outside standard hours.

Once you have the measurements of all windows in Seattle you can easily figure out how much it would cost to wash them all (although by the time you've done them all you'd need to do them all again so I suppose you could charge infinite).


3. How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?
Spoiler:
Clearly only a single one. His name is Tuner Klaus and on one starry night he flies around the whole world tuning pianos in a single awe filled feat.


4. Every man in a village of 100 married couples has cheated on his wife. Every wife in the village instantly knows when a man other than her husband has cheated, but does not know when her own husband has. The village has a law that does not allow for adultery. Any wife who can prove that her husband is unfaithful must kill him that very day. The women of the village would never disobey this law. One day, the queen of the village visits and announces that at least one husband has been unfaithful. What happens?
Spoiler:
Blue eyes lolololo. All husbands are brutally murdered on day 100.


5. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?
Spoiler:
Jump out. If I remember correctly mass is proportional to the square to muscle strength and jumping ability would be dependant on muscle strength and mass, since the ratio of muscle strength to mass is insanely higher than at your normal height it should be no problem to simply jump out of the blender. It may also be possible to stick to the slopes of the blender through friction/surface tension assuming it's a decent shape, or perhaps jump and grab onto the hole in the lid (they often have a small hole) if the lid is on before you can get out.


6. If you look at a clock and the time is 3:15, what is the angle between the hour and the minute hands?
Spoiler:
Assuming the time is exactly 3:15 then... 2nπ for n = 0, 1, 2, 3, ...


7. Suppose we have N companies, and we want to eventually merge them into one big company. How many ways are there to merge?
Spoiler:
One way, the only available distinct result is 'one big company'.


8. Why are manhole covers round?
Spoiler:
Because a circle cannot, regardless of orientation, fit through an identically sized and shaped hole.


9. A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened?
Spoiler:
He pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune.


10. Explain the significance of “dead beef.”
Spoiler:
Beef isn't alive, so 'Dead Beef' is redundant and only significant in that it is redundant.


11. Design an evacuation plan for San Francisco.
Spoiler:
Psh, I don't know these American cities...

If San Francisco was in need of evacuation the general plan would be to have military troops guide people out in an orderly manner while making sure to optimise (to a reasonable amount... since the knapsack problem is unsolved) travel loads. You could follow general rules like "Fill up travel capacity in an even manner" which would (most of the time) lead to better travel flow than not following the rule.


12. You have eight balls all of the same size. Seven of them weigh the same, and one of them weighs slightly more. How can you find the ball that is heavier by using a balance and only two weighings?
Spoiler:
Weigh an arbitrary 3 vs an arbitrary 3 if the groups are the same then weigh the remaining two against each other to find the heavier. If one of the groups is heavier then measure 2 of the heavier 3 against each other. If they balance then the remaining non-measured heavier ball is the heaviest and if they don't balance then the heavier of the two is clearly the heaviest.





Edit: Reading some of the other answers I realise I made some silly mistakes, haha. That's what I get for rushing it.
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
"Do you admit there is no meaning to this world?"
- > No

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby kansasdave » Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:26 am UTC

7.
Spoiler:
Assuming companies merge in pairs, and order matters:
To save space, C(X,Y) = X Choose Y = X! / (Y! * (X-Y)!)

First pair of companies can be chosen in C(N,2) ways
2nd pair of companies in C(N-1,2) ways (choosing 2 from the set of all N-2 remaining companies, plus the one merged company)
kth pair of companies in C(N-k+1,2) ways

= [(N)(N-1)/2] * [(N-1)(N-2)/2] * ... * [(3)(2)/2] * [(2)(1)/2]

= N! * (N-1)! / 2^(N-1)

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Adacore » Sun Dec 06, 2009 1:42 am UTC

Since nobody's done it yet, I'll try a serious attempt at 2:
Spoiler:
Two values are needed here - how many windows are there in Seattle and how much should you charge per window. Let's say $5 per window, which sounds not entirely unreasonable, given that some of them will be pretty big and/or difficult to access (eg skyscrapers).

Now, if you say Seattle has a population of 3 million (I used Wiki for that, as I'm assuming it was a question for people who actually live on the US West Coast who might actually know the ballpark figure offhand). So, window counting:

I'd reckon on each person having on average 6 windows in their residence, which gives 18 million residential windows.
This being the US, I'm also going to say around one vehicle for every two people, and an average vehicle has another 6 windows, for another 9 million automotive windows.
Now for places of work, I think the window ratio is probably slightly lower than for residential areas, I'm going to take a guess at 4 windows per worker, with half the population working, which gives 6 million commercial windows.

Total all that, and you get 33 million windows at $5 each, so $165 million dollars for a one-time washing of every window.

I have no idea how accurate my estimates are, or if I missed any window sources (the only other thing I can think of straight off is if there's some kind of huge glass-making factory there it could add a few more million windows).

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Gelsamel » Sun Dec 06, 2009 1:46 am UTC

My attempt at 2 was serious...

Anyway;
Spoiler:
Families
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
"Do you admit there is no meaning to this world?"
- > No

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Adacore » Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:18 am UTC

Gelsamel wrote:My attempt at 2 was serious...

Anyway;
Spoiler:
Families

There was no number; I'm an engineer - if there isn't a numberical

Spoiler:
What about families? My calculations were based on average windows per person (in what I guessed to be an average-size, average-occupancy residence).

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Yakk » Mon Dec 07, 2009 1:50 pm UTC

Adacore:
Spoiler:
The problem is that if you quote a price for every window in the area, and you don't prove you wash EVERY window, you haven't done the service.

The expensive part isn't the labour: the expensive part is designing some system that makes it possible to verify that every window has been washed at least once. This will involve crazy-ass logistics (because doing it with more than 1 person), redundant washing (because your systems will have failure), window search-and-locate teams (so you can find the windows) etc.

Your price is off by at least one, if not multiple, orders of magnitude. The problem presented is ridiculously hard. It just looks easy.

Hence my answer: don't do it. To do it with reliability, possibly the only "practical" method becomes "nuke the place so there are no windows", which is politically infeasible and morally indefensible.
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Goldstein » Mon Dec 07, 2009 2:56 pm UTC

If you're going to be bombing, you might as well use some sort of soap bomb while you're at it.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Adacore » Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:00 pm UTC

Yakk wrote:Adacore:
Spoiler:
The problem is that if you quote a price for every window in the area, and you don't prove you wash EVERY window, you haven't done the service.

The expensive part isn't the labour: the expensive part is designing some system that makes it possible to verify that every window has been washed at least once. This will involve crazy-ass logistics (because doing it with more than 1 person), redundant washing (because your systems will have failure), window search-and-locate teams (so you can find the windows) etc.

Your price is off by at least one, if not multiple, orders of magnitude. The problem presented is ridiculously hard. It just looks easy.

Hence my answer: don't do it. To do it with reliability, possibly the only "practical" method becomes "nuke the place so there are no windows", which is politically infeasible and morally indefensible.

Spoiler:
I disagree, and have two connected counter-arguments:

The first way of looking at it is just by the laws of economics. I know the market rate for washing windows is around $5 per window. I can't charge more than that, or I'll be priced out of the market. If that's the market rate, then it must be possible to wash each window for less than $5, especially with the economies of scale, leaving plenty of money left over for the administrative overheads and profit.

A slightly different view; I think with the economies of scale involved, the price I quote is quite reasonably achievable. Obviously none of the actual window washing would be done by me - I'm busy running my multi-million-dollar city-wide window-washing business. But I just need to subcontract out the washing of each individual city block, for example. Say I do that at a rate of $4 per window, I then have a good $30 million to spend on the administrative side (and profit). If I make sure the subcontracts for window-washing include some kind of robust washed-window-checking procedure, that's fine.

I'd have to get the payment either upfront or in stages, with limited damages if the client (presumably the City of Seattle) can demonstrate that I have not met my contract requirements of washing every window. These damages would, presumably, be linked to the number of unwashed windows and I'd certainly have to invest a bit of money beforehand to a risk analysis and working out at what level these damages should be set, in negotiation with the client. It's not an insurmountable problem though - it's just a standard multi-million dollar project; I work for a company that does them all the time.

Now, that's not to say I would quote for the job, because I'm clearly neither qualified nor equiped to organise the washing of millions of windows on the other side of the world. But the thought experiment seems to be asking for a best guess at a quotation, so that's what I gave.

EDIT: TL;DR: I wouldn't expect the washing of every window to be linked to the full payment amount, the number of windows unwashed would be a deduction (in the form of limited damages) from the final contract price, having unwashed windows wouldn't void the contact entirely.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby justeastofhere1 » Wed Dec 09, 2009 2:51 pm UTC

I was asked #8 in an interview for a systems analyst (not at Google) job...
Spoiler:
My answer was "because manholes are round" but they pushed for another answer so I guess that wasn't what they were looking for


Also...
Spoiler:
Is it just me or are people over thinking the 3:15 clock question, wouldn't the angle be 0 or 360 because both hands are pointing at the same number?

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Adacore » Wed Dec 09, 2009 3:19 pm UTC

justeastofhere1 wrote:Also...
Spoiler:
Is it just me or are people over thinking the 3:15 clock question, wouldn't the angle be 0 or 360 because both hands are pointing at the same number?

Spoiler:
No, because the hour-hand is only at '3' (exactly 90 degrees from vertical) at 3:00, by 3:15 it's moved a quarter of the way towards the '4'.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Yakk » Wed Dec 09, 2009 3:43 pm UTC

Re:
Spoiler:
The first way of looking at it is just by the laws of economics. I know the market rate for washing windows is around $5 per window. I can't charge more than that, or I'll be priced out of the market. If that's the market rate, then it must be possible to wash each window for less than $5, especially with the economies of scale, leaving plenty of money left over for the administrative overheads and profit.

The 5$ per window price is for washing particular identified windows, on a piece-meal basis.

For example, 1 oz of gold might be 1000$. 1000 oz of gold might be 1 million dollars. 10 billion oz of gold is not 10 trillion dollars, because you simply cannot find 10 billion oz of gold.

"Economies of scale" only happen when economies of scale actually happen. When they don't happen, they don't. There is no law of economics that economies of scale must happen. There is a law of business that if you believe in economies of scale, you (as a CEO etc) can justify a larger fiefdom and larger salary by scaling up your business.
But I just need to subcontract out the washing of each individual city block, for example. Say I do that at a rate of $4 per window, I then have a good $30 million to spend on the administrative side (and profit). If I make sure the subcontracts for window-washing include some kind of robust washed-window-checking procedure, that's fine.

My point is that the checking is going to be much, much more expensive than the actual washing. Remember, you are being paid to wash every window -- you aren't being paid to wash 99.9% of windows.

If you miss a window in an internal courtyard in a private estate, covered up by a shack on one side and drywalled over on the other, you haven't washed every window.
I'd have to get the payment either upfront or in stages, with limited damages if the client (presumably the City of Seattle) can demonstrate that I have not met my contract requirements of washing every window. These damages would, presumably, be linked to the number of unwashed windows and I'd certainly have to invest a bit of money beforehand to a risk analysis and working out at what level these damages should be set, in negotiation with the client. It's not an insurmountable problem though - it's just a standard multi-million dollar project; I work for a company that does them all the time.

Great! Now you have a contract for washing almost every window in Seattle. That is a contract I'd give a reasonable price for.

The "every window in Seattle" contract is, however, not reasonably achievable. It is quite distinct from washing almost every window in Seattle. That I'd quote a reasonable price on.
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Adacore » Wed Dec 09, 2009 8:00 pm UTC

Yakk wrote:
Spoiler:
Great! Now you have a contract for washing almost every window in Seattle. That is a contract I'd give a reasonable price for.

The "every window in Seattle" contract is, however, not reasonably achievable. It is quite distinct from washing almost every window in Seattle. That I'd quote a reasonable price on.

Spoiler:
Yeah, we're arguing semantics. For a job that size, in a business context (ie the context of a company like google), you'd have the kind of contract I described. The 'every window' is obviously a generalisation :mrgreen:

As has been previously raised, the interpretation of the question is probably one thing they want to assess, but so long as you approach your interpretation of the question with a solid methodology you can probably do fine no matter what interpretation you assign, so long as you can justify your interpretation.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby mrbaggins » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:25 pm UTC

I'd be really tempted to be a bit silly with these. Or give multiple answers with a short explanation.
1. How many golf balls can you fit in a school bus?
Spoiler:
More than I'd ever need at the driving range.


2. How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?
Spoiler:
Sensible- $10 / hour
Silly - $1 / hour less than the last guy you asked.
Sillier - Whatever the last guy said, plus $100,000 for you and $100,000 for me.

3. How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?
Spoiler:
Given that I know I'm able to get my piano tuned, and the guy seems to be able sustain his own lifestyle, I'd say there's about the right number of piano tuners, at least in my local area.

4. Every man in a village of 100 married couples has cheated on his wife. Every wife in the village instantly knows when a man other than her husband has cheated, but does not know when her own husband has. The village has a law that does not allow for adultery. Any wife who can prove that her husband is unfaithful must kill him that very day. The women of the village would never disobey this law. One day, the queen of the village visits and announces that at least one husband has been unfaithful. What happens?
Spoiler:
Reworded blue eyes. Given that there are no rules against talking on this island though, the women would talk. At this point, every woman is able to prove infidelity, at least insofar as testimony is proof, and all men would be executed that same day. The talking actually allows for a whole new set of problems though... And what does "Can prove" really mean?

5. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?
Spoiler:
I don't think ducking/lying down would work, blenders are made to suck stuff up into the blades. Would perhaps sitting very close to the middle of the blades work, holding on and spinning around like crazy?

6. If you look at a clock and the time is 3:15, what is the angle between the hour and the minute hands?
Spoiler:
Before 3rd grade - There isn't an angle there.
After 3rd grade - 7.5º

7. Suppose we have N companies, and we want to eventually merge them into one big company. How many ways are there to merge?
Spoiler:
One. By getting the sign off of all assets and liabilities from one companies CEO or board to transfer them to a second.

8. Why are manhole covers round?
Spoiler:
Because a Reuleaux Triangle is harder to manufacture even though it has the same relevant properties.

9. A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened?
Spoiler:
I've heard it before - Monopoly
Literal - A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune.

10. Explain the significance of “dead beef.”
Spoiler:
Computers - Magic hex number
Food - It tastes delicious
Silly - To annoy vegetarians
Linguistics - To illustrate redundancy in adjectives.

11. Design an evacuation plan for San Francisco.
Spoiler:
Why redesign one? There's enough different ones at the movies. Just use one of those.

12. You have eight balls all of the same size. Seven of them weigh the same, and one of them weighs slightly more. How can you find the ball that is heavier by using a balance and only two weighings?
Spoiler:
With scales.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby VDOgamez » Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:21 pm UTC

I'm surprised that on this forum of all places nobody has noticed that in the context of Google, Dead beef can be taken to mean...
Spoiler:
DEADBEEF, which is a famous memory address in many IBM systems that marks newly allocated memory. :roll:

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Yakk » Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:09 pm UTC

Shhh, I'm hunting wabbits.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby jaap » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:13 pm UTC

VDOgamez wrote:I'm surprised that on this forum of all places nobody has noticed that in the context of Google, Dead beef can be taken to mean...
Spoiler:
DEADBEEF, which is a famous memory address in many IBM systems that marks newly allocated memory. :roll:

Except for Soljer on the first page, and mrbaggins just above you. No doubt many others just gave the jokey answers because it has already been answered...

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby shadowdodger » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:50 pm UTC

For question number 6)
Spoiler:
Wouldn't it actually be 352.5 since it's the angle from the hour hand to the minute hand, and not the other way around?
Wouldn't it be the outside angle the two hands?
*shrug*

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby mrbaggins » Mon Dec 14, 2009 9:22 pm UTC

It says the angle between them. Not from one to the other.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Twilightfoxx » Wed Dec 16, 2009 2:52 am UTC

5.(Sorry, can't copypasta atm...)
Spoiler:
It's a glass blender. Break the glass and jump out.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Indon » Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:43 pm UTC

1. How many golf balls can you fit in a school bus?
Spoiler:
Depends on how big the school bus is and the quantity of individuals presently in the bus.[/quote]

2. How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?
[spoiler]I would track the total amount and quantity of windows in the town by investigating the glass and window-making industries in the area and estimate my total charge based on that.


3. How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?
Spoiler:
If professionals only, then I'd estimate the number as a smallish percentage of the total number of pianos in the world, 5-10%.

If any individual with the ability or inclination to tune a piano, I'd probably double that number.


4. Every man in a village of 100 married couples has cheated on his wife. Every wife in the village instantly knows when a man other than her husband has cheated, but does not know when her own husband has. The village has a law that does not allow for adultery. Any wife who can prove that her husband is unfaithful must kill him that very day. The women of the village would never disobey this law. One day, the queen of the village visits and announces that at least one husband has been unfaithful. What happens?
Spoiler:
This seems like the Blue Eyes problem, but I don't think it's exactly the same. Every woman already knows that 99 husbands have been unfaithful. Only if the queen states that 99 husbands have been unfaithful would anyone know anything new, at which point every other woman kills their husbands that day, because the queen of the village does not know her husband is unfaithful. The queen kills her husband on day 2 in that scenario.


5. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?
Spoiler:
I jump out, as the square-cube law has given me super strength (In America!). If that's impossible, then I get under the blades.


7. Suppose we have N companies, and we want to eventually merge them into one big company. How many ways are there to merge?
Spoiler:
N!/2?


8. Why are manhole covers round?
Spoiler:
Because sewer pipes are round.


9. A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened?
Spoiler:
He was very poor. Didn't know about the monopoly connection until reading part of the thread.


10. Explain the significance of “dead beef.”
Spoiler:
It's a set of words that correlate to a hexadecimal number. There's probably some cultural significance, similar to 'foo', but I don't know it.


11. Design an evacuation plan for San Francisco.
Spoiler:
Absolutely not enough information. What's my budget and time constraints? Engineering problems require parameters! The optimal evacuation plan would change based on budgetary and time constraints.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Fiddly » Wed Dec 23, 2009 4:53 pm UTC

These are mostly really old and overused cs interview questions. I would be surprised if Google has used them in the past several years, probably not ever. In particular the DEADBEEF and Hotel/Fortune ones seem particularly worthless, Google wants to test how you approach problems, not whether you know historical information or lateral thinking puzzles. For developer interviews at least. I would be a little surprised if they used a Fermi estimation question for a developer interview too.

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Yakk
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Yakk » Wed Dec 23, 2009 5:01 pm UTC

The ones that cite what interview they where used for ... end up saying that most of them are not for developers.

Stuff like program managers and the like.
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drazen
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby drazen » Thu Dec 24, 2009 4:25 pm UTC

You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?


I'm a bit rusty on my physics, but if you were thrown into a blender after being shrunk down under these conditions, wouldn't that just be the equivalent of falling several stories off a building, and therefore you'd be splattered all over the bottom of the blender, dead (and thus, do nothing) before the blades ever started spinning?

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby Puck » Thu Dec 24, 2009 7:05 pm UTC

I'm also rusty on my physics, but I'm pretty sure that the increased effect of air resistance would prevent that from happening. Also (and I'm probably mis-stating this, but I think the idea is right) your mass reduction is proportional to your volume reduction, but the reduction in strength of bone structure is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the bone; in other words, when you are shrunk, your structure becomes stronger in relation to your mass.

So I think you'd probably be okay.
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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby d0nk3y_k0n9 » Fri Dec 25, 2009 12:13 am UTC

The force felt on an object falling a given distance has nothing to do with how tall (or large) the object is, only on how far it falls, the force of gravity, and how quickly it comes to a stop. Thus, if we ignore the change in mass, you falling a foot is you falling a foot, regardless of whether you've been shrunk or not.

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Re: 12 Craziest Google Interview Questions

Postby mrbaggins » Fri Dec 25, 2009 12:22 am UTC

There's also something in there about the fact that you can't kill ant's, cockroaches, small creatures by dropping them. Small mass = small force thanks to Newtons (second?) law.
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