Food fleeting thoughts

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:08 am UTC

There’s also the matter of scale-making a gross of muffins is a bit different from making a dozen.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby poxic » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:09 am UTC

144 of anything would be a lot to eat by oneself.

Well, except maybe rice or cornflakes.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:15 am UTC

I worked at cookies by design for almost four years. It was my first Real Job when i turned 14.

I eventually did everything but baking, as i wasnt allowed to opperate ovens at that age.

But i sure do wish i knew their spice cookie recipe. I know its probably a secret n all that but id sure be making them for myself lol. So. Good.

Someone posted what is basically their sugar cookie recipe (apparently) on the internet. So the recipes cant be too secret or that wouldve been shut down. But i never liked those as much. Just sweet and no flavour. But the spice cookie...

Sigh. I do miss the free cookies on saturday. Closed sunday so we got to take all the cookies home hehe.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:12 pm UTC

Make a spice blend you like.
Make sugar cookie mix.
Add spice blend.
Spice cookies!
Free cookies are a good thing.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:34 pm UTC

PAstrychef wrote:Make a spice blend you like.
Make sugar cookie mix.
Add spice blend.
Spice cookies!
Free cookies are a good thing.

Well thats part problem, ive never found a sugar cookie recipe ive liked
If i look up spice cookie its all gingerbred and i really hate molasas and similar flavours.
I have no clue where id start.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Moo » Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:46 am UTC

Have you ever had Dutch speculaas? It's probably not at all what you're referring to, as I know American cookies are usually soft and chewy and these are crisp, but they are very yum.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Wed Feb 27, 2019 5:57 pm UTC

Moo wrote:Have you ever had Dutch speculaas? It's probably not at all what you're referring to, as I know American cookies are usually soft and chewy and these are crisp, but they are very yum.

Not that brand, but Lotus Biscoff yes, which the internet tells me are basically the same thing.
lotus faq wrote:WHAT IS SPECULOOS OR SPECULAAS?
Speculoos is the generic name of the traditional crispy, spice cookies from Belgium. Speculaas is the name given to the same type of cookies in Holland. Lotus Biscoff Cookies are Speculoos or Speculaas cookies.

They're good with tea. But def a biscuit not a cookie. I'd fail at great british baking show, i'd be making all the soft moist cookies and traybakes and totally off the first day. I remember their American Pie challenge, and paul hated like, every single pie. Well paul, I disagree with you. Our pies are amazing. And for biscuits I think I'd make proper Biscuits and Gravy, just to piss them off and introduce them to some fine southern culture baking :P
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Zohar » Wed Feb 27, 2019 6:54 pm UTC

I'm confused because it sounds like you're referring to biscuits in two different ways in the same paragraph. I thought American biscuits were those fluffy sorta-buns that you'd have with, yes, biscuits and gravy. But I think of speculoos as a cookie/British biscuit.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:40 am UTC

I did. Speculoos (lotus) are a biscuit (british), and certainly not a cookie (american). They are actually called biscuits (as in british biscuit) here.

Then i made a joke that id be kicked off GBB because Id making soft fluffy biscuits (american) instead of hard biscuits (british), just to be goofy and get under paul hollywoods skin. I wanna see the face he would make. Hehe.

Its like...the one place chips in america are chips (british) are when you order fish n chips. Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).

Isnt lanaguage fun?
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Quercus » Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:38 am UTC

Sungura wrote:Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).


Do you get British chips (thick cut) or fries (thin cut)?

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sableagle » Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:02 am UTC

Turns out Nepal is a great place for vegetarian food.

They have dhal bat (ignore the "h" and make both "a"s long), which is lentils and rice and veg curry and more lentils and more rice and more veg curry, veg. thali (prononced "tally" as in counting), which is kinda similar but spinach and veg curry and curried veg and pickle and rice and a popad and more spinach and more rice and more veg curry and more curried veg, and this weird stuff made of buckwheat flour and chickpeas that's served in a very similar way:

Image

It's kind of like "nutrient paste" from science fiction, but stiff and dense. I finished mine alright, mixing spoonfuls of it with the tastier other things, but one of the younger guys who normally polished off everyone else's food gave two big lumps of his paste to the local stray dogs.

The dhal bat and thali, though? Heck yeah. Found a place just across the main road from Kathmandu's airport where decent veg thali and sweet masala tea cost me 260 rupees aka about $2.50 US, and in Pokhara we got veg thali for 220 rupees each in a little café with "OPEN" painted on the door and a friendly grandmotherly type running it. Stuff was spicy but it was good! Sharmila, here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pokha ... 83.9955879 ... but actually next to Holy Momo, not where that placemarker is.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Zohar » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:23 pm UTC

Thali is actually the name of the plate. Anyway I haven't gone to a Nepalese restaurant I think, but there's lots of food in that region that's fantastic for vegetarians, yes.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:26 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
Sungura wrote:Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).


Do you get British chips (thick cut) or fries (thin cut)?

Thick cut / british - what we would further define as wedges.
Eg all variatnts are fries here:
Steak fry - the thin cut sticks (see steak n shake fries)
Wedges - british style (i think burger king fries count here, but also yes any fry from a chippie there in uk)
Waffle - shaped as sounds (see chickfila fries)
Crinkle - thick but with waves (like wavy lays)
Curly - in spirals! (See arbys fries)

Majority of fries lay between steak and wedge and have no further defining word i know of; id include mcdonalds, wendy, and the vast majority of fries here.

Fuck now i want to go back to that chippie on the barbican i like. Grrr. Meh its only 16+ hours of travel, right?

We also have pasties here. Well. In Michigan we did. Cornish miners brought them back in mining days. Rutebega is used instead because we have it here. Otherwise, same as a traditional cornish pasty. I remember my brit friends being shocked i knew what a pasty was, and what was in it, and had them before.i will add those prima pasties are so good fresh, though!
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby dubsola » Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:55 am UTC

Sableagle wrote:Turns out Nepal is a great place for vegetarian food.

It sure is. Nepali Dal Bhat is the one food from a country I've travelled in where I just never ever got tired of it. Unlike dal in India, it's not spicy.

I loved seeing all the different variations from each tea house / restaurant to the next. I loved the fact that you can have as much as you like - just ask for more. It's the culture.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby natraj » Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:17 pm UTC

there's about seventeen thousand different kinds of dals in india and only some of them are spicy though?? saying dal is spicy is as utterly ludicrous a statement as saying that soup is spicy.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby dubsola » Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:11 am UTC

Woops. You're right, of course. I was thinking about the most commonly found dal in "Indian" (ie Rajasthani) restaurants in Western countries. Even then they all have their own recipe. Same in Nepal actually. While it's all pretty much soup, there's a difference from one tea house / restaurant to the next. But I think it's fair to say that in general Nepali dal bhat has less spice, especially chilli, than say a Rajasthani dal bhat.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby flicky1991 » Sun Apr 07, 2019 11:44 pm UTC

Had this delicious Thai pork rice bowl for lunch. Picture came out nice too.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Mon Apr 22, 2019 5:51 pm UTC

As I’m sitting eating a bowl of grits for lunch, I can’t help but marvel at what a wonderful food source corn is. If I were religious, I’d say it’s truly more of a “gift from god” than any other grain is. I mean, the grains themselves are large, the plant is fairly easy to grow, it’s fairly high yielding, it is easy to process, it tastes really good. When you nixtamalize it and serve it with beans, that provides pretty much every nutrient you need. (And corn and beans grow well together.)

I mean, wheat is pretty cool and all: that gluten is absolutely magical stuff, but corn ticks off basically every box for a staple crop.

And to think that our best guess is that it was domesticated from teosinte is amazing! It’s stunning to me, but they’re quite close genetically.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Apr 22, 2019 11:02 pm UTC

And all of those traits are the result of millennia of genetic modification. When planted with squash and beans it doesn’t ruin the soil the way it does when it’s monocropped. Nutritionally it isn’t bad, but it does need to be ground to make most nutrients accessible.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby sardia » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:26 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:And all of those traits are the result of millennia of genetic modification. When planted with squash and beans it doesn’t ruin the soil the way it does when it’s monocropped. Nutritionally it isn’t bad, but it does need to be ground to make most nutrients accessible.

To add onto this, I wouldn't pick this as the crop of the future. It's tasty, but that's from decades of subsidy enabled food experimentation. There's a cool study looking into tasty,cheap, and easy to grow crops. It's usually a obscure crop that people sorta grow, but with no culinary history behind it.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Sat Apr 27, 2019 8:51 pm UTC

sardia wrote:
PAstrychef wrote:And all of those traits are the result of millennia of genetic modification. When planted with squash and beans it doesn’t ruin the soil the way it does when it’s monocropped. Nutritionally it isn’t bad, but it does need to be ground to make most nutrients accessible.

To add onto this, I wouldn't pick this as the crop of the future. It's tasty, but that's from decades of subsidy enabled food experimentation. There's a cool study looking into tasty,cheap, and easy to grow crops. It's usually a obscure crop that people sorta grow, but with no culinary history behind it.

I wouldn’t pick it as the crop of the future, either — it’s annual and it does require rich soil to grow well. That results in large-scale degradation of the environment between erosion and runoff from all the fertilizers and pesticides used in monocropping.

I believe that perennial crops are going to be the way of the future. Unfortunately, they tend to yield less than annuals (because the plant doesn’t need to reproduce every year to survive!) and mostly haven’t had any work put towards domesticating them. I mean, lots of the semi-cultivated stuff you mention had some effort put towards domestication, and although they were never fully domesticated, there’s still “improved” genotypes that are fairly readily accessible.

The US corn belt loses obscene quantities of soil every year — the official estimate is around 4 tons per acre, per year. The fact that virtually every major staple crop in the world is annual (or is grown as an annual) contributes to this: the roots are far shallower and the fields usually get tilled occasionally. Plus, there’s just bare soil exposed when there’s no crop planted there.

I do believe that there’s lots that could be done in finding new crops to feed the world: there’s literally tens of thousands of plants with parts of varying edibility and nutrition. I’m also fascinated by all the semi-domesticates and crop relatives.

For instance, Chenopodium in the US — Native Americans domesticated a plant from the same species quinoa was domesticated from, but abandoned it after maize was introduced. There’s still semi-domesticates in some areas: I bet they’d provide great potential to improve quinoa, like increasing its heat tolerance.

Then there’s neat stuff like Melothria — it’s tasty when immature, but the mature ones are laxatives. Some in Central America were semi-domesticated and don’t have the negative effect from ripe fruit and are now being grown by hobbyists. I bet the wild US forms could be bred with the “domesticates” to produce a perennial form.

Around my house, there’s wild, perennial chiles. Normal chiles die over winter here, but I’ve literally never seen the wild ones die over winter, even with temperatures down to 17°F! Ordinary chiles were domesticated in the tropics and don’t have much cold hardiness, but I’d bet you could breed in some from wild chiles in Texas and the US Southwest (and North Mexico).

Just around my house in Central TX, there’s a decent array of wild, edible plants. Admittedly, it would be very difficult to feed yourself from them, but lots of them are delicious and incredibly hardy plants. I believe most places have a pretty good array of edible wild plants that might be worth investigating for domestication.

One of the most interesting stories along this line IMO has to be Mexican buckeye — Ungnadia speciosa. This is a small, shrubby tree that is incredibly drought tolerant, grows decently fast ins oils that are basically just rock, and makes large quantities of big, black seeds around 1/2” in diameter. The oil from these nuts does not spoil or go bad and tastes good, so in the early 1900s, it was being investigated as a potential oil crop. In one study, the scientists were feeding seeds to rats, and they’d been snacking on them themselves. Apparently, they are quite tasty, similar to hazelnut. Then, they found all the rats died of liver and nervous system toxicity — it turns out the seeds contain cyanide containing lipids and saponins, both of which are quite toxic! If they could breed a variety without those, it’d be an incredible oil crop: you could grow it without any irrigation or fertilizer in many areas not currently considered arable, and get decent yields. If it’s feasable, it’s certainly worth investigating, but afaik, all research down that track has been stopped. I mean, there’s other toxic plants (like cassava and taro) that have been domesticated and used, why not something else?

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby sardia » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:01 pm UTC

My guess would be it's a big leap between niche plant vs staple crop that feeds billions. You probably have to make special crops for each region(lessons the burden on main crops), while the big staple crops feeds the majority of the world. Jackfruit(bread fruit tree) is pretty interesting for the tropics. Less meat for the western countries, more eggs for South Asia/India (easy protein that's cheap).

Edit: corrected fruit name
Last edited by sardia on Sun Apr 28, 2019 4:50 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Angua » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:06 pm UTC

Durian and breadfruit are not the same thing.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:06 pm UTC

I suspect that once the basics of domestication had been managed people stopped the hard work of developing new plants (as opposed to improving an extant form). We had achieved tasty cultivars of food, what else did we need, especially in times when modifying an organism took years and years.
With animals, we seem to have domesticated the species able to be domesticated-check out the Russian work on domesticating foxes-the other large ungulates just aren’t interested. Zebras would seem to be a good candidate, but even if hand reared from foals they keep a nasty disposition over generations.
Necessity may once again be the mother of innovation in agriculture.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby sardia » Sun Apr 28, 2019 4:53 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:I suspect that once the basics of domestication had been managed people stopped the hard work of developing new plants (as opposed to improving an extant form). We had achieved tasty cultivars of food, what else did we need, especially in times when modifying an organism took years and years.
With animals, we seem to have domesticated the species able to be domesticated-check out the Russian work on domesticating foxes-the other large ungulates just aren’t interested. Zebras would seem to be a good candidate, but even if hand reared from foals they keep a nasty disposition over generations.
Necessity may once again be the mother of innovation in agriculture.

We still develop crops, remember when all apples were red delicious? If I recall, having trade deals was how avocados took the US by storm. If we wanted to get more diverse food supply, free trade around crops would be a start. Though you'd need to regulate it to prevent ecologically harmful crops from increasing in market share.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby DavidSh » Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:40 am UTC

Breadfruit is Artocarpus altilis.
Jackfruit is Artocarpus heterophyllus.
The edible parts of a properly ripened jackfruit are quite tasty. They show up in Asian groceries near me sometimes. I've never had breadfruit, though.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Sun Apr 28, 2019 10:19 pm UTC

sardia wrote:We still develop crops, remember when all apples were red delicious? If I recall, having trade deals was how avocados took the US by storm. If we wanted to get more diverse food supply, free trade around crops would be a start. Though you'd need to regulate it to prevent ecologically harmful crops from increasing in market share.

Apples have had thousands of varieties for hundreds of years. Red delicious became America’s apple because it was pretty and shipped well. My favorite grower from the local market carries about thirty varieties over the season. The avocado and banana both took generations of work to become the fruits they are today. And the monoculture of bananas has led to possible extinction by a disease.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Mon Apr 29, 2019 1:38 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:The avocado and banana both took generations of work to become the fruits they are today. And the monoculture of bananas has led to possible extinction by a disease.

Bananas are a very unusual case — although there’s literally not thousands of varieties, most originated as vegetative mutations. This leads to cultivar groups that can contain many varieties each (for instance, the Cavendish cultivar group contains a number of varieties that have different characteristics: Dwarf Cavendish, Grand Nain, Super Dwarf Cavendish, Mahoi, Giant Cavendish, etc — Grand Nain is the principally grown commercial cultivar of dessert banana).

Sexual reproduction is very difficult, even in wild bananas (the seeds don’t germinate readily). It’s virtually impossible among domesticated bananas: the biggest banana breeding program, FHIA, gets something like 2-3 seeds per 100 pounds of fruit, when every flower is hand pollinated. They grow out seedlings via embryo rescue because the seeds are hard to sprout with conventional techniques.

Despite that, there’s evidence for multiple domestication events. We’re not entirely sure how they were initially selected, but there were probably no new sexually produced varieties of banana until the FHIA program came around.

The problem you mention is Panama Disease — it wiped out commercial production of Gros Michael. The Cavendish variety currently used was discovered by an extensive search for a suitable commercial variety among existing ones. Unfortunately, a new strain of the disease emerged that can kill this one, too.

The thing is most bananas don’t ship well, at all. It’s really hard to find a disease resistant, good yielding dessert banana that ships well. The FHIA program is conventionally breeding bananas to fill that gap — there’s a few they’ve produced that might, but the taste is too different for most consumers (especially in the US). Banana varieties have a huge range of tastes, and although I’ve only had a few, Cavendish kind of sucks in that respect.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Apr 29, 2019 3:48 am UTC

Yes, the banana flavoring used commercially is the flavor of the Gros Michel, not the cavendish. That’s why banana candies can leave you wondering what flavor they are.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby freezeblade » Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:52 pm UTC

pogrmman wrote:Around my house, there’s wild, perennial chiles. Normal chiles die over winter here, but I’ve literally never seen the wild ones die over winter, even with temperatures down to 17°F! Ordinary chiles were domesticated in the tropics and don’t have much cold hardiness, but I’d bet you could breed in some from wild chiles in Texas and the US Southwest (and North Mexico).


In my warm summer Mediterranean climate (SF bay area), I keep a line of chilies that are essentially this, I had a seedling Italian heirloom pepper plant (cuerno de toro, a large-ish slightly hot pepper) which over-wintered and I trellised it much like a small grape plant, cutting it back to it's scaffold and letting the new growth bud out from the remaining structure. I have since saved the seed and been keeping giving it out to friends. It ends up with a slightly lower yield each year, but I bet that could be fixed or stabilized by some proper breeding.

I bet this would be a pretty easy undertaking in much of the California growing areas, as they don't receive freezing temps so often, and some hearty genes from more northerly climes could result in multi-year pepper and tomato plants, which could then be bred towards a plant structure which takes well to trellis training. If I had the space I would totally love to undertake something like this, but all proper breeding like that is a numbers game to get good selections, and I just don't have the space.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Tue Apr 30, 2019 3:59 pm UTC

freezeblade wrote:I bet this would be a pretty easy undertaking in much of the California growing areas, as they don't receive freezing temps so often, and some hearty genes from more northerly climes could result in multi-year pepper and tomato plants, which could then be bred towards a plant structure which takes well to trellis training. If I had the space I would totally love to undertake something like this, but all proper breeding like that is a numbers game to get good selections, and I just don't have the space.

I’ve been semi-seriously considering undertaking this here — we don’t get that cold in the winter, but ordinary chiles only survive in the mildest 20% or so of winters here. If anything, this might be an advantage because it normally does get cold enough to see which plants actually are cold hardy and which aren’t.

Another advantage is that the wild chiles here, though tiny, incredibly seedy, and taking a long time to ripen, are super flavorful. They’ve got this incredibly complex, wonderful flavor that’s hard to put into words. I made some hot sauce using just them, salt, and a bit of Mexican oregano, and some vinegar, and it’s literally some of the best that I’ve had.
They’re also quite hot: comparable to habaneros.

I want to start by crossing with New Mexico chiles because those also have very nice flavor in addition to many other desirable characteristics. Plus, any hybrid offspring would be easy to tell apart — the wild ones have small flowers and leaves, with tiny upright, rounded pods, while New Mexico peppers have big flowers and leaves and long, pointed, hanging pods. And they’re the same species, too, so they should cross well.

The biggest reason I haven’t done it yet are the fact that I’m in college in another state with a very short growing season (to my Texan self) and without much of a place to grow stuff.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:46 pm UTC

If your college offers any kind of botany or agriculture or even biology classes where they do DNA stuff I bet you could get some grow space and extra credit!
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby freezeblade » Tue Apr 30, 2019 11:03 pm UTC

pogrmman wrote:Another advantage is that the wild chiles here, though tiny, incredibly seedy, and taking a long time to ripen, are super flavorful. They’ve got this incredibly complex, wonderful flavor that’s hard to put into words. I made some hot sauce using just them, salt, and a bit of Mexican oregano, and some vinegar, and it’s literally some of the best that I’ve had.
They’re also quite hot: comparable to habaneros.


They sound very similar to wild chilies that I saw around San Diego when I lived there, which I classified as Tepin. I'm pretty sure they are these: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum_ ... briusculum) or closely related.
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Wed May 01, 2019 5:16 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:If your college offers any kind of botany or agriculture or even biology classes where they do DNA stuff I bet you could get some grow space and extra credit!

I do actually work in the greenhouse here, but it’s already pretty packed and they’d be hard pressed to give extra credit to a chem major for botany stuff, even though I know all the botany people in the bio department quite well :p Plus, I’m only gonna be here one more year.

freezeblade wrote:They sound very similar to wild chilies that I saw around San Diego when I lived there, which I classified as Tepin. I'm pretty sure they are these: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum_ ... briusculum) or closely related.


They are tepins. C. annuum var. glabriusculum is the only native wild chile in the US (Florida has introduced wild C. chinense), but it comes in two forms: tepins and pequins. Tepins are round and a bit hotter, pequins are pointy and milder, but the flavor is pretty similar. Both grow wild in Texas, but around here it’s usually tepins. The plants themselves are a bit different — the leaves on pequins tend to be a tad smaller and they tend to be less woody than tepins. Tepins only rarely die to the ground (usually dying back to the trunk and main branches), but pequins die to the ground more frequently.

Tepins have so many great things going for them: they’re very delicious, they’re long-lived perennials (I first found one bush at my house over 7 years ago, and it already had a trunk nearly 1” thick when I found it!), they get good sized (another bush is sometimes 4’ tall and 6’ wide, depending on winter severity), they set literally hundreds of fruit, they grow in partial shade, they thrive in our incredibly shallow soil (maybe 4-6” deep on top of caliche/chalk/limestone), they’re drought tolerant, and are pretty pest resistant. But they’ve got their downsides: the fruit are quite small and have very little flesh, they take a long time to set fruit (so aren’t suitable for short-season climates), and they are erratic to germinate. They’re also a little hot for some purposes.
It’s not like my family or I can’t tolerate spicy food, but we literally add tepins one by one if a pot of chili is too mild: they’re hot enough that only 6-8 are needed to bring it from too mild (though my midwestern college friends wouldn’t say that :p) to quite spicy.

A big reason I want to use New Mexico chiles for this project is they check off pretty much all the downsides of the tepin: they germinate easily and consistently, they’ve got thick flesh and large pods, and many cultivars don’t need that long to fruit. But they don’t introduce many downsides: they’re less pest tolerant and need more sun, irrigation, and fertilizer, but they still taste fantastic (which is huge for me).

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Tue May 07, 2019 4:14 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:Yes, the banana flavoring used commercially is the flavor of the Gros Michel, not the cavendish. That’s why banana candies can leave you wondering what flavor they are.

Oh me yarm now that deserves to be on QI.
I always liked banana flavour better than bananas. Now i know why!

Also this whole discussion is awesome.

I wish i knew more about the wild plants here I can eat. Violets. Plantain. Onion. Carrot. Cattails. Thats about all i got. I am sure many more.

Is anything domesticated from cattails?
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