Page 3 of 32

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Aug 02, 2008 4:21 pm UTC
by clintonius
Ah yes, I forgot about the amaretto, which I also bought and wound up keeping.

One of my favorite drinks when I'm in the mood for something a bit sweet and don't feel like a straight rum and coke is to dash a little amaretto in there. Mm mm good!

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Aug 02, 2008 7:55 pm UTC
by Matt
clintonius wrote:Oh man. I once had a bottle of sloe gin, purchased because I had read about it when researching things to mix with Southern Comfort (hey, I was just discovering alcohol. I've gotten better, I promise). As far as I can recall, it's the only bottle I've ever actually poured down the sink. It was THAT gross.


Sloe gin up until this point has BEEN gross. This stuff transcends the category; it's made with Plymouth Gin which we all know is fantastic, and actual sloe berries in the traditional manner instead of artificial flavors and junk. Bols and Hiram Walker taste generally like ass and cherry cough syrup, which is why they've been relegated to a Rose's Grenedine-esque role in cocktails like the Sloe Screw, etc; this stuff is serious. If you see Plymouth's in a bar, please give it a try.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 3:08 am UTC
by MotorToad
I'm not a rum guy by trade, but...
Image
Yum. Nice stuff. I have no idea of price or availability as it came to me from Costa Rica, but I whole-heartedly approve of its existence. So long as I get to make it not exist anymore. :)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:22 am UTC
by Amarantha
clintonius wrote:With that said, who here is familiar with cachasa?


Caipirinha ftw!

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:30 am UTC
by clintonius
Hell yeah caipirinhas! I rocked a few of those this weekend. Mmm -- that IS a tasty beverage!

Also, MotorToad, do you experience any form of withdrawal when the rum from abroad runs out? I got started on this stuff called Flor de Cana from Nicaragua, and it's damn near impossible to find in the states. But DAMN is it good. I highly recommend it to anybody who comes across a bottle (particularly the 7 year -- anything younger is a tad weak, and the 12 isn't worth all the extra $$).

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:15 am UTC
by MotorToad
Sorry, no, I had about 350 ml of it. Scotch, on the other hand, is a walking withdrawal any moment that there isn't a glass in my hand. :)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:01 am UTC
by danpilon54
MotorToad wrote:Scotch, on the other hand, is a walking withdrawal any moment that there isn't a glass in my hand. :)


Finally someone who shares my struggle! I think its becoming a serious problem with me :P

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 8:09 pm UTC
by Bakemaster
This past weekend at Scaredcrow's house I sampled some of his favorite scotch: Ardbeg 10 year-old, an Islay single malt. Very, very nice. I think depending on the occasion, I might prefer the Laphroiag quarter cask, or I might prefer this one, but I've only just tried it the once so we'll see.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 10:42 pm UTC
by MotorToad
Bakemaster wrote:This past weekend at Scaredcrow's house I sampled some of his favorite scotch: Ardbeg 10 year-old, an Islay single malt. Very, very nice. I think depending on the occasion, I might prefer the Laphroiag quarter cask, or I might prefer this one, but I've only just tried it the once so we'll see.

Ardberg is yummy, no doubt. I prefer Laphroaig 10 year to it, though, so I'm sure I wouldn't cast it in the same league as 'Phroaig QC. When I manage to get my dirty hands on the QC, of course...

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 10:46 pm UTC
by clintonius
I really need to get back into scotch sampling. A friend of mine just brought back some cigars from abroad, and I think I'm going to pick up a bottle of the 12-year Glenlivet, which can be had for a silly $33 at the place around the corner that otherwise has ridiculously inflated prices. I'm pretty excited.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 4:37 am UTC
by Dream
clintonius wrote:I really need to get back into scotch sampling. A friend of mine just brought back some cigars from abroad, and I think I'm going to pick up a bottle of the 12-year Glenlivet, which can be had for a silly $33 at the place around the corner that otherwise has ridiculously inflated prices. I'm pretty excited.


There's a distillery that does a release called "The Cigar Malt", but I can't remember which one it is. I'll sprunge around a bit and find out.

A-HA! it's a Dalmore.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 1:17 am UTC
by Bakemaster
MotorToad wrote:Ardberg is yummy, no doubt. I prefer Laphroaig 10 year to it, though, so I'm sure I wouldn't cast it in the same league as 'Phroaig QC.

Well, they're very different. The peat flavor of the latter is stronger than anything else I've ever had, but the Ardbeg is definitely smoother, while still being fairly peat-y. That's why I think depending on the situation I might prefer one or the other. It's kind of like the difference between 85% and 70% dark chocolate?

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 8:46 pm UTC
by Rinsaikeru
I was in the Jameson's distillery when I was in Ireland, the only thing they offered as a mixer was cranberry juice--though I usually just have it straight up.

I don't tend to like any carbonated mixers (aside from soda water) much, though I do like amaretto and coke because it tastes like Dr. Pepper.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:42 am UTC
by Matt
I'm bumping this thread because it's the most recent; score another one for Ted Haigh. I gave the Millionaire cocktail a try the other day, and it fell flat. It called for Jamaican rum, so I used Appleton VX and 2.1.1.1 proportions. There was just not enough character from the rum and the sloe gin, even using Plymouth. So on the Good Doctor's orders, I went and picked up a little bottle of Myers's and used his edited proportions. What a fantastic little drink! The excessively dark rum lends a deeper, spicier base for the other flavors to tame.

Millionaire

1 1/2 oz Myers's Dark Rum
3/4 oz Apricot Brandy (Apry)
3/4 oz Sloe Gin (Plymouth)
juice of one lime (roughly 1 oz, maybe step it back to 3/4 of an oz)

shake over ice and strain into cocktail glass

I might give it a shot with Black Strap or Goslings if I feel like it

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:50 am UTC
by Azrael
Try it with Appleton Extra. VX is 'known' to not play well with others. Despite it's marketed as the Move Beyond Rum and Coke rum.

I forget where you are, but I think the north shore for some reason -- and I've found it for $18 a bottle at Lynnway Liquors.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:37 pm UTC
by the_stabbage
I'm pretty new to Whisk(e)y and Bourbon. I've had Jack - unpleasant. Went out and got a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red Label and Jameson's with a friend. I liked the Red Label just sliiiightly more. So the other day I decided to get another scotch, nothing expensive or single malt. I got a bottle of J&B. It's pretty decent with soda. I had it plain in a brandy glass and the alcohol fumes were worse than anything I've ever tried out of that glass. Ouch.

So, suggestions for mixing with that stuff?

Any suggestions for the next bottle of scotch? Probably won't get anything over like 50 bucks unless I can be convinced.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:56 pm UTC
by clintonius
the_stabbage wrote:I'm pretty new to Whisk(e)y and Bourbon. I've had Jack - unpleasant. Went out and got a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red Label and Jameson's with a friend. I liked the Red Label just sliiiightly more. So the other day I decided to get another scotch, nothing expensive or single malt. I got a bottle of J&B. It's pretty decent with soda. I had it plain in a brandy glass and the alcohol fumes were worse than anything I've ever tried out of that glass. Ouch.

So, suggestions for mixing with that stuff?

Any suggestions for the next bottle of scotch? Probably won't get anything over like 50 bucks unless I can be convinced.

If you're looking to jump into the single-malt pool, most of the 12 years -- Glenlivet, Glenfiddich, the Macallan, etc -- are good starting-off points and can be had for less than $50. Just please don't mix them.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 7:10 pm UTC
by the_stabbage
clintonius wrote:
the_stabbage wrote:I'm pretty new to Whisk(e)y and Bourbon. I've had Jack - unpleasant. Went out and got a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red Label and Jameson's with a friend. I liked the Red Label just sliiiightly more. So the other day I decided to get another scotch, nothing expensive or single malt. I got a bottle of J&B. It's pretty decent with soda. I had it plain in a brandy glass and the alcohol fumes were worse than anything I've ever tried out of that glass. Ouch.

So, suggestions for mixing with that stuff?

Any suggestions for the next bottle of scotch? Probably won't get anything over like 50 bucks unless I can be convinced.

If you're looking to jump into the single-malt pool, most of the 12 years -- Glenlivet, Glenfiddich, the Macallan, etc -- are good starting-off points and can be had for less than $50. Just please don't mix them.


Alright, I wasn't going to mix them. Just looking for mixers for the J&B because it's not fantastic.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 9:52 pm UTC
by MotorToad
the_stabbage wrote:Alright, I wasn't going to mix them. Just looking for mixers for the J&B because it's not fantastic.

J&B is... not fantastic. :) Scotch comes in three grades, IMO. Too expensive, marvelous, and should be avoided. If you're wanting to mix, get a cheap bourbon or Canadian whisky. (I think I've expressed here before, many cheap Canadian whiskies are very good drinking whiskies for the money.) Famous Grouse is a good blended Scotch, and I've had Grant's which is really cheap and a decent whisky, but I wouldn't call it a decent Scotch. IMO Red Label is among the best quality for the money, I personally prefer it to Black Label. Dewar's is decent enough, I guess, but nothing I'd go out of the way for. Or buy. Do not allow even the aroma of Cutty Sark to approach your palate. Good Single Malts aren't that much more, as clintonius said. He basically listed my non-Islay standards.

As for mixing... generally I don't think you should. Scotch is either too good to mix or too expensive to mix when you could just get a $14 bottle of domestic whiskey. There are so many good mixed drinks you can make from vodka or gin (liquors that aren't to be drank alone, as far as I'm concerned). Mai tais, mojitos, martinis; that's about as far as I go for mixed drinks. :)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 12:09 am UTC
by Nebuduck
I swear by Highland Park. But I'm not very good at the whole value-for-money thing. I just go for the nicest possible.

But yeah, right now I have a glass of Highland Park 12 year old. And with a nice cuppa, it's all one could ask for at one in the morning.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 4:37 am UTC
by Dream
MotorToad wrote:Famous Grouse is a good blended Scotch, and I've had Grant's which is really cheap and a decent whisky, but I wouldn't call it a decent Scotch.


I'd have to disagree 100%. Grouse I'd call decent, but certainly not good, and Grant's is actually very good, although it's a bit bland next to most good malts. I'd far prefer to have a bottle of Grant's in the cabinet that a bottle of Grouse.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 6:59 am UTC
by JayDee
I bought a bottle of scotch this weekend to celebrate finding a new place to live. Man, I had forgotten how nice it is to drink spirits.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:20 pm UTC
by Bakemaster
If the strength of the alcohol in a quality/expensive Scotch bothers you, try it on the rocks. A number of people will make faces at you for this, but if you enjoy it, that's all that matters.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:31 pm UTC
by clintonius
Bakemaster wrote:If the strength of the alcohol in a quality/expensive Scotch bothers you, try it on the rocks. A number of people will make faces at you for this, but if you enjoy it, that's all that matters.

Alternately, if you don't like people making faces at you, try thinning the scotch with a little bit of water (people say mineral water, but honestly, it doesn't matter). This is actually wholeheartedly endorsed by many scotch drinkers, due to some phenomenon I don't understand that causes the taste of scotch supposedly to change when it comes in contact with ice. Said phenomenon apparently doesn't occur when you thin it with water. But as bake said, your enjoyment is tantamount. I sometimes put ice in my scotch, and I think the reduced temperature provides a nice counterpoint to the mild and pleasant burn of the alcohol in your gullet.

Nebuduck wrote:I swear by Highland Park. But I'm not very good at the whole value-for-money thing. I just go for the nicest possible.

But yeah, right now I have a glass of Highland Park 12 year old. And with a nice cuppa, it's all one could ask for at one in the morning.

I totally read that last part "it's all one could ask for in the morning." :shock:

. . . and was about to praise your dedication (and maybe question the health of your liver)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:06 pm UTC
by Nebuduck
Well, of course I like to start my day with a good scotch too, but personally I'd go for something more peaty with breakfast.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:10 pm UTC
by EsotericWombat
Winston Churchill wrote:When I was younger I made it a rule never to take strong drink before lunch. It is now my rule never to do so before breakfast.


:P

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:45 pm UTC
by MotorToad
clintonius wrote:
Bakemaster wrote:This is actually wholeheartedly endorsed by many scotch drinkers, due to some phenomenon I don't understand that causes the taste of scotch supposedly to change when it comes in contact with ice. Said phenomenon apparently doesn't occur when you thin it with water.

The cold temperature masks the flavor. Which is why stouts are perfectly drinkable (better, imo) at room temperature and even the people that claim to like Curs Laght won't drink it if it's over 33.5ºF; if you can actually taste the stuff your tongue rejects it! :)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 20, 2008 1:45 am UTC
by i.t.homp
Highland Park 15 is quite excellent. not as peaty, but a nice light summer scotch. i mix my famous grouse (a blend of single malts) with ginger ale and limejuice (seriously...try it)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 5:56 am UTC
by MotorToad
Image

If someone offers this to you, do not refuse it. :mrgreen:

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:28 am UTC
by Dream
Wait, people need to be told that ? Hmmn, Irish Whiskey isn't the force it once was, it seems :)

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:02 pm UTC
by the_stabbage
Anyone tried Fernet Branca? It's a herbal liqueur (Wikipedia tells me "amaro") which of course has a secret recipe. It's pretty smooth, really bitter, and unique. A friend and I described it as "taking a bite of every piece of vegetation on earth". Pretty nice with cola, that's been my after-dinner drink or a while since I don't think that stuff can be used in cocktails easily.

Also I tried my first single-malt scotch the other day: a Glenlivet 12. Wow! Blew anything else out of the water. Had me describing it in abstract concepts and bursting out laughing at how good it was. Though I do that a lot. This could turn into an expensive hobby...

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:35 pm UTC
by Bakemaster
The 15 is more expensive, but better. I heard the 18, though even more expensive yet, was not.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:38 pm UTC
by existential_elevator
Matt wrote:
clintonius wrote:Oh man. I once had a bottle of sloe gin, purchased because I had read about it when researching things to mix with Southern Comfort (hey, I was just discovering alcohol. I've gotten better, I promise). As far as I can recall, it's the only bottle I've ever actually poured down the sink. It was THAT gross.


Sloe gin up until this point has BEEN gross. This stuff transcends the category; it's made with Plymouth Gin which we all know is fantastic, and actual sloe berries in the traditional manner instead of artificial flavors and junk. Bols and Hiram Walker taste generally like ass and cherry cough syrup, which is why they've been relegated to a Rose's Grenedine-esque role in cocktails like the Sloe Screw, etc; this stuff is serious. If you see Plymouth's in a bar, please give it a try.


I'm making my own sloe gin at the moment. We're using London Dry. I am no gin buff, sadly, though. It does, however, look very impressively purple/black at the moment.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:51 pm UTC
by Felstaff
existential_elevator wrote:I'm making my own sloe gin at the moment. We're using London Dry. I am no gin buff, sadly, though. It does, however, look very impressively purple/black at the moment.

Boodles! Oodles of Boodles!

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:31 pm UTC
by clintonius
Bakemaster wrote:The 15 is more expensive, but better. I heard the 18, though even more expensive yet, was not.
I can vouch for the 18 being not fantastic. Some friends and I went in on a bottle for graduation, and while it's perhaps a tad better than the 12-year, it's definitely not worth the extra cost (double the 12-year, if I recall correctly).

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:09 pm UTC
by the_stabbage
I'd imagine a scotch that's aged for long enough would just taste like wood chips.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:29 am UTC
by Dream
the_stabbage wrote:I'd imagine a scotch that's aged for long enough would just taste like wood chips.

Yeah, but that takes decades to happen. Occasionally you get very old whisky that's been in oak far too long, but it's quite rare. More likely it's just bad casks, or bad blending that leads to too much oak. And that can happen at any age.

Clintonis & Bakemaster, I agree. But I put it down to the 12yo Highland Park being so excellent that its a hard act to follow. I still think the 18 is very good.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:32 pm UTC
by Azrael
Adding to the high improbability that a scotch is over oaked is that the barrels are typically once used bourbon barrels.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:49 pm UTC
by the_stabbage
That's true, scotch is usually aged in used barrels, either bourbon or sherry casks. But if someone decided to make "The chardonnay of scotch!" and age it in new French oak by the time it got to 12 years it would be like drinking splinters.

By the way, why does everyone age their scotch 10 or 12 years? Is it a matter of prestige that single malts are at least 10 years old, or does the aging make such a significant difference? Legally, scotch only has to be aged for 3 years.

A final question for you top-shelf booze drinkers: what about oxidation? Does it happen to liquor? If I were to get myself a single malt, it would take me around two months till I empty the bottle.

Re: The Liquor Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:55 pm UTC
by Azrael
the_stabbage wrote:That's true, scotch is usually aged in used barrels, either bourbon or sherry casks. But if someone decided to make "The chardonnay of scotch!" and age it in new French oak by the time it got to 12 years it would be like drinking splinters.


I'm not sure about that. I've had up to 30 year rum, and 18 year bourbon -- both aged in new oak -- that weren't really that woody.

Sure oxidation happens. But in the course of two months it's not going to be perceptible to any but the most refined and practiced tasters.