Curious Local Flavours

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Rinsaikeru
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Rinsaikeru » Fri Oct 17, 2008 4:52 am UTC

Maple syrup DOES make everything better. I've put it in lots of things. :D Including, but not exclusive to: pie, tea, in marinades for chicken and on every possible breakfast food...including eggs. :P
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quintopia
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby quintopia » Sat Oct 18, 2008 12:53 am UTC

I like maple syrup in lots of things too, as long as it doesn't involve the actual sap of actual maple trees. Give me maple-flavored corn syrup and I'll put it in all kinds of deserts (or drinks). Real maple syrup is disgusting.

Anyway, I think the exposition of the southeast failed to mention these things:
Vidalia onions (available all over, but only grown in GA)
boiled peanuts in coca-cola
cajun boiled peanuts
turnip greens and collard greens with pepper sauce
3-layer jello (cherry, lime, and cream cheese) (actually, i don't know how local this is, but it's probably more common here)
Cheerwine (all artificial cherry flavoring, all-natural cheery flavoring, Oh me yarm so much better than dr. pepper)

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Rinsaikeru
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Rinsaikeru » Sat Oct 18, 2008 12:59 am UTC

I've had that 3 layer jello thing before. So...maybe regional to North America. :P


Fake maple syrup is ick. o_o
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby shieldforyoureyes » Sat Oct 18, 2008 2:38 am UTC

Bakemaster wrote:Regarding bird stuffing, the best I ever had was one with prunes. I don't remember what else was in it, but oh man, that prune stuffing was amazing. I love stuffing to death; it's my favorite part of Thanksgiving.


A friend of mine made turkey stuffed with assorted fruit. It was fantastic.

My favorite holiday tradition is pumpkin pie with a little bit of horseradish on it. Mmmmm.

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Random832 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 5:29 pm UTC

PictureSarah wrote:Sourdough. You apparently can't get it on the east coast. There are some breads that are *labeled* as sourdough, but they aren't really sourdough at all. Apparently it's a west coast of the united states thing, particularly California (which makes sense, as it was invented for the miners during the goldrush.)

TheAmazingRando wrote:Sourdough bread is incredible. I feel bad for anyone who doesn't get to enjoy it. I knew it originated in the bay area, I had no idea it was still mostly local.


Invented? Originated in the bay area?

"sourdough" is simply the process by which all bread was made before yeast was discovered. The process is still used everywhere for rye bread.

Wikipedia wrote:Sourdough likely originated in Ancient Egyptian times around 1500 BC, and was likely the first form of leavening available to bakers. Sourdough remained the usual form of leavening down into the European Middle Ages[5] until being replaced by barm from the beer brewing process, and then later purpose-cultured yeast.


*grumble californians thinking they own everything*

There may be something to that bit about local yeast strains, but that doesn't mean the stuff elsewhere that may taste different is somehow "not sourdough".
----
Anyway, on-topic - apparently the pork tenderloin sandwich is specific to the midwest.

Another midwestern thing is Cincinnati-style chili (Skyline etc), which has a completely separate origin from Texas-style.

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby PictureSarah » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:44 pm UTC

The technique may have been invented elsewhere, but I interpret the word "sourdough" literally, and if my bread does not have the nice, tangy sourness to it, I do not consider it sourdough. And I have only encountered the appropriate sourness in California. Although I hear that the purple bread served with ethiopian food is also sour. I have yet to try it.
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby pooteeweet » Tue Mar 17, 2009 5:53 am UTC

quintopia wrote:I like maple syrup in lots of things too, as long as it doesn't involve the actual sap of actual maple trees. Give me maple-flavored corn syrup and I'll put it in all kinds of deserts (or drinks). Real maple syrup is disgusting.


:evil: Bite your tongue!

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Random832 » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:28 pm UTC

pooteeweet wrote:
quintopia wrote:I like maple syrup in lots of things too, as long as it doesn't involve the actual sap of actual maple trees.


As opposed to the actual sap of corn plants? Oh, wait... At least with real maple syrup you know where it comes from.

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Mar 17, 2009 6:54 pm UTC

If by "sap" you mean "highly processed industrial corn slurry".
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Mar 18, 2009 1:36 pm UTC

Chicago's Italian Beef sandwich. The cheese steak has escaped Philly but the true italian beef hasn't gone very far.
Imagine a french-dip with spicy cooked beef, and garnished with sweet and hot peppers, on a roll sturdy enough to hold up to the gravy.
A great treat.
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby Random832 » Wed Mar 18, 2009 2:29 pm UTC

How could i forget sugar cream pie?

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby pooteeweet » Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:45 pm UTC

The southern foods list neglected to mention po-boys. Mmm. Fried shrimp po-boys. Cajun sausage po-boys. Also, Alligator sausage (preferable to fried alligator, which is a bit too chewy).

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Thu Mar 19, 2009 3:01 am UTC

pooteeweet wrote:The southern foods list neglected to mention po-boys. Mmm. Fried shrimp po-boys. Cajun sausage po-boys. Also, Alligator sausage (preferable to fried alligator, which is a bit too chewy).


I also forgot to mention the po-boy's cousin, the muffaletta.
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby csam » Mon Mar 30, 2009 4:47 pm UTC

Dang, I am really jealous now. You see, I grew up near Philly, and dishes that are unique to Philly have a habit of being kinda or very disgusting. So sue me, I don't like cheesesteaks... and I cannot see how anyone in their right mind thinks that scrapple is food. The only good stuff we have to offer are hoagies, tomato pie, water ice, and our soft pretzels, and those are really just variations on food you'll find elsewhere.
(as a side note, half of the foods I mentioned are not recognized by google's spellchecker)

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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby netcrusher88 » Wed Apr 01, 2009 4:07 pm UTC

Rochester, NY has this thing called a garbage plate. It's kind of a heart attack on a plate, but it's delicious. You take a plate, cover it half with homefries and half with macaroni salad (or just kind of whatever you want), put either a hot dog (red hot or white hot (white hots seem to be an upstate NY thing, I dunno)) or two hamburger patties on it, add a couple slices of cheese, add mustard and chopped red onion, and smother it in a Rochester invention known only as hot sauce. Rochester hot sauce is something like ground beef suspended in something that most people would recognize as a very thin dark colored hot sauce.

The dish is a monstrosity, invented by a restaurant in downtown Rochester called Nick Tahou's Hots. Come to think of it, so is the hot sauce. Anyway, highly recommended if you ever find yourself starving and broke in Rochester. Just have some antacid handy if you're prone to heartburn and understand that some people consider finishing a garbage plate worthy of an "I survived" t-shirt but would never admit it.

http://www.garbageplate.com/

Note: there are a lot of imitators that serve a garbage bowl or a trash plate or something like that. It's either a trademark thing or a sort of respect for the progenitor. Either way, I don't think they differ much.
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Re: Curious Local Flavours

Postby DSenette » Wed Apr 01, 2009 5:35 pm UTC

there's a restaurant in New Orleans called "Igor's Garlic Clove" (at least there was...not sure if it still is)...and they serve EVERYTHING with garlic in it (the garlic ice cream is great! garlic coke....not so much)

one of my favorite regional dishes is Boudin (being from southern louisiana...it's kind of a requirement)...it's a sausage that's stuffed with rice pork, pork livers, and god knows what else...it's like gumbo in a tube! (sort of like those yogurt tubes but not quite so gross)
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