The Martial Arts Thread

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:59 pm UTC

I see this thread sliding now, even though it's nice to see people on the alert when it comes to sexism I'd rather see this thread stick to martial arts.

Just to strike up another somewhat flammable subject that's also interesting:
How much wisdom do your teachers attempt to spout with regards to martial arts and the more philosophical stuff? One of my two main instructors talks a lot. But considering that he attempted to use a slinky toy as a metaphor for shifting your weight back and forth I'm not sure I'm going to pick up any ancient words of wisdom from him. He did mention the most important technique for a streetfight, running. He's a generally cool guy in that he really wants to help his students as much as he can. Hell, he even offered to help with [high school? / swedish gymnasium] level math for some of the teens who might need it.

But generally our Muay Thai training doesn't include a lot of philosophical concerns. It's all friends and fighting.
Your experiences? I'd love to hear of the oriental mysteries people have grokked through martial arts, even though I'm often a skeptic.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby Patman » Tue Nov 18, 2008 12:58 am UTC

Geoff (my instructor) teaches BJJ in a very pre-plucked manner. There is no philosophical fluff, no extraneous warm ups, just technique and sparring. This is good and what I pay him for. I have found many MA clubs are run like a church, thankfully our club is not run like a church.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby Nath » Tue Nov 18, 2008 1:27 am UTC

Crowey: fair enough; I think we just read different things into the post.

Anyway, both of my instructors liked to talk, though neither was preachy or overly philosophical. The first liked to discuss the legal and ethical aspects of self-defence, or just little nuggets of (martial and other) history. The second usually goes off-topic when in a talkative mood, usually before or after class. Once while choking me out. It was odd.

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"

Postby Vi » Tue Nov 18, 2008 1:51 am UTC

crowey wrote:So what is this universal language you've learned through martial arts if it doesn't involve pain?

On topic, it seems you have some misconceptions about Judo. Judo isn't all joint locks, chokes and throws. Those are the submissions, but getting there is the work. "Position before submission." (and don't forget transition!) I'm not going to define 'grappling,' but in any situation I would rather put someone where I want them, and put myself where I want myself, without hurting either of us. In a fight, I'd like to put myself in a position where I can run away.

I'll spoiler the more off-topic part of my response, because I hope this is the last we'll see of it:
Spoiler:
Crowey, you are reading sexism into my post. I don't know why, and I won't speculate.

crowey wrote:OK.
Vi wrote:I know you bad-ass guys

Assumption that everyone on the thread is male.

You assume this assumption. This was a lighthearted reference to the recent discussion involving Kachi. I did not intend for it to be taken literally and seriously, and your confusion is perhaps my fault. Maybe I need to use more emoticons :D

crowey wrote:
are concerned about assholes in bars who decide they want to kill you,

Assumption that this is why men do martial arts and/or this is when then need to apply them in real life.
Perhaps drawn from statistics, more likely drawn from stereotypes.

Again, you assume this is my assumption. I did not say "this is why men do martial arts," I said "this is the kind of self-defense situation that YOU in this thread care about," which I drew from simply reading the thread. If you read the thread, you'll find plenty of mention of bar fights, and none of situations that I care about, until my post. Again, I apologize for the confusion. It would perhaps have been clearer if I had just said "In this thread, you guys mention..." (and I'm using 'guys' in the gender neutral plural sense, before you yell at me! :wink: )

crowey wrote:
but for ladies

Condesending word for women, implying we are fragile delicate and behave nicely.

I've never heard the view that the word 'ladies' is an offensive term, and I'm sorry if I've offended you, because I did not mean it that way. What culture are you from?

Obviously, our experiences have been quite different, and our opinions more so. Again, I apologize for offending you, for I merely intended to bring another view to the thread, one that I hadn't seen in it so far.


As for instructors, all of the ones I've had have done a little bit of ritual and bowing at the beginning and end of class, but nothing time consuming.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Tue Nov 18, 2008 7:21 am UTC

Hmm, we do bow at the beginning and end of class, at least for one of our instructors. I think he wants us to great our partner with a bow too, but it hasn't stuck with most of us. Sometimes our more talkative instructor will tell us some history or background for this or that, but he's recommended that we simply read up on it online if interested.
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Re: "

Postby crowey » Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:07 pm UTC

spoilered for off topic:

Spoiler:
First, sorry for jumping on you vi, I was being grouchy and picky more than any real offence taken :oops:
Second, yes, maybe I was reading too much into it, re "Ladies" being offensive, it's not offensive like calling women bitches and Hos is, but it is offensive in the slightly patronising undertone it tends to take... hard to explain, I'm British BTW.
Anyhoo, no hard feelings?


back on topic-ish...
vi wrote:On topic, it seems you have some misconceptions about Judo. Judo isn't all joint locks, chokes and throws. Those are the submissions, but getting there is the work. "Position before submission." (and don't forget transition!) I'm not going to define 'grappling,' but in any situation I would rather put someone where I want them, and put myself where I want myself, without hurting either of us. In a fight, I'd like to put myself in a position where I can run away.

I have no misconceptions about judo, I do Ju Jitsu which has many of the same elements (what with the tied history of those two arts and such). I just don't think that being able to move an attacker around to a more favourable position would be enough in a self defence situation, I mean, people attacking are usually quite intent on continuing to attack until something actually stops them. The thing that stops them is physical restraint and/or large amounts of pain. Obviously legging it is the best option, but getting into that position is usually tricky, and most often requires damaging the other person some.

Re: spiritual stuff, we bow at the start of kung fu and ju jitsu lessons, and before starting a sparring bout and that's about it. It's nice to show respect to your instructors and fellow students.
Occasionally talk of chi and such comes in at kung fu, but it's always more of a discussion rather than instructors preaching the spiritual stuff, so there's a few of us that always bring up physics and biology with scientific explainations....


I hate to leave things mid discussion, but I'm off on holiday for a week, I promise I'm not flouncing from the thread :lol:
Enjoy the vacation from me :wink:

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby Nath » Sat Dec 13, 2008 12:28 am UTC

Relevant to a discussion on page one:
http://www.useofforce.us/

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby deconvoluted » Sat Jan 10, 2009 1:11 pm UTC

Shorinji Kempo = super spiritual. There's even 10 minutes set aside each (2hr) class for "philosophy discussion.", and about 5 minutes for zen meditation. The dojo kun says that we are grateful to be endowed with our souls from Dharma.

On the plus side, because there's a dedicated 10 minutes, it means the rest of the time there is no spouting, just training. Plus, it makes a nice break between the hard techniques and the soft ones.

I don't mind it when Senseis get spiritual - as long as it doesn't get in the way of solid training.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby aleflamedyud » Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:56 pm UTC

I'm currently an 8th-kyu (yeah, just started) at Shotokan Karate, but used to have a 5th Kyu (blue belt) rank in Tae Kwon Do. Of course, our awesome, kickass sensei for the Tae Kwon Do taught us more than *just* TKD, he also taught us some holds, locks, and ways to break out of them and some grappling.

BTW, does anyone know a Krav Maga dojo in the Western Massachusetts area? Probably not, but I might as well check. I keep wanting to learn Krav Maga for if I ever actually have to fight someone -- which, knowing me, I will.

I was absolutely amazed one night after training to find out that some of my friends had never been in a physical fight, and they were equally amazed to find out that until mid high school I got in fights about every other month. Not saying it's anything to be proud of, just wondering if "no violence, ever" is actually a common experience.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:38 pm UTC

I've never been in a real fight. I recall being beaten once by one of the bad boys in my class when I was a wee kid (5-6 years old) and got pissed off enough to actually try and attack him. Other than that little failure I can't recall ever being in a fight outside of Muay Thai practice. Feels a bit like betraying my love for Fight Club but I'd have a hard time living up to that movie at any rate.

Fighting doesn't seem very evenly distributed across the population. I'd imagine it's like wealth, 90% of the fighting only includes 10% of the population.
Note: Completely made up statistics.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby eightysevendegrees » Sun Jan 18, 2009 8:17 pm UTC

jbn wrote:Hmm, we do bow at the beginning and end of class, at least for one of our instructors. I think he wants us to great our partner with a bow too, but it hasn't stuck with most of us. Sometimes our more talkative instructor will tell us some history or background for this or that, but he's recommended that we simply read up on it online if interested.


We bow at the start and end of classes, whenever we enter or leave the hall and we bow to our partners after we've done any work in pairs. I like it. Probably because it's not something that ever comes up in daily life so it just seems nicer.

As for talking... my instructor talks a lot, but not philosophical stuff. He'll tell us amusing annecdotes or make comments about how we could go in for cancan if we don't make it as martial artists (if we're doing an exercise with two front kicks on the same leg). There's something strange about a man who'll make us do horrible exercises but can make us laugh while we're doing them. There are times I think he's a being of pure evil, but in a nice way.

I do kung fu. I've only been doing it for a couple of months but I took my first grading today. I think it went quite well.

Before the grading, I had a class with the chief instructor of the style for the whole of the UK. My regular instructor may be occasionally evil, but at least he's friendly and cheerful while he's being evil. The chief instructor is downright scary!

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby shortbus » Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:04 am UTC

At my old dojo, we used to bow before and after class, occasionally accompanied by a brief period of makso(meditiation). As for the philosophical side, my senseis put more emphasis on it at the higher levels(2nd kyu and up, shotokan) and basically after nidan the rest of the black belts are earned based on understanding of the philosophy and teaching ability.

I really enjoyed my dojo since it had a strong traditional background mixed with a modern sense of competition and teaching.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby studyinserendipity » Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:28 am UTC

I had my first sparring class yesterday!! My tae kwon do school requires students to demonstrate sparring techniques for all belts above yellow. It was really exciting and I landed some good kicks and punches, but it felt a little awkward too. I was walking stiff-legged because I wasn't used to moving with all the pads on!

Concerning bowing/respect/philosophy: We bow at the beginning and the end of class, and to our partners and opponents. There are some basic respect tenets that are in play - bowing before you enter/exit the mat area, removing your shoes when you enter the school, and giving higher belts the right-of-way. All of these I have encountered in BJJ and (to some extent) in fencing. Sometimes the instructors insert quick 'informational lectures' about a particular move or form; for example, the last time the school's founder visited, he talked for a couple minutes about the difference between hard and soft arts and how particular tae kwon do forms incorporate some elements of both. So there is some philosophy and history, but it does not overshadow the physical practice. In sparring (from what little I've done so far) there is also an emphasis on strategy and adjusting your style to effectively spar against different people.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Mon Jan 19, 2009 10:48 am UTC

Ah, sparring. I've been down and out with the flu now of all times, during the start of a new term of Muay Thai. It's hell I tell you. Going to get back into it now on tuesday.

A bit surprised that you don't get to spar more in TKD but I imagine it depends a lot on whether the school wants you to compete, then you'll probably get more sparring.
Once we have our basic techniques down and have developed the sense to not go all out when working combinations/blocking with a partner we got sparring in our ordinary practice. Extra classes had sparring from the beginning but beginners weren't allowed until we'd picked up the basics.

Sparring is insanely fun, everbodies scared of their first punch in the face :)
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby studyinserendipity » Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:46 pm UTC

Haha, yeah I haven't got a fist to the face yet; although the first time I made good contact with my partner I jumped back and said "Oh my gosh, are you okay?!" I've only been going to the light sparring classes since I just started, so nothing above the shoulders is allowed.
At my TKD school they have special sparring classes held throughout the week. I think the classes are held separately from forms and 'regular' classes because those classes are open to all levels, and sparring isn't allowed until you've passed the first 2 tests and hold a yellow belt. Although sometimes in regular classes we'll work with partners and pads and go back and forth, it's never full contact like in the sparring class. It seems to go along with what you were saying about the white belts and yellow stripes needing the basics down before actually trying them out on others.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby eightysevendegrees » Mon Jan 19, 2009 5:29 pm UTC

jbn wrote:Once we have our basic techniques down and have developed the sense to not go all out when working combinations/blocking with a partner we got sparring in our ordinary practice. Extra classes had sparring from the beginning but beginners weren't allowed until we'd picked up the basics.

I've not done sparring yet. Initially, I had to learn the basics but I'm ready now (I hope!). My instructor asked me just before Christmas when I was going to start staying for sparring after the main class but I've never actually managed to stay yet. There was the break over Christmas and New Year. Then the main instructor was off on a course and I didn't feel like staying for my first sparring class with a substitute instructor. Then I intended to stay last week but ended up nearly fainting in the class and figured going home was a better option.

Sparring does sound like fun. Everyone seems to really enjoy the sparring classes.

I have had a punch in the face even without going to sparring. It wasn't at all hard thankfully. We were practicing crane blocks in pairs. The guy I was working with did a much slower punch than I was expecting so I ended up blocking before the blow.

The first time I did an exercise making contact, we were doing kicks to the ribs. I think the person I was working with must have told me about half a dozen times that it would be fine if I kicked her a bit harder.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:18 pm UTC

The first times you connect with any kind of hit and any time you accidentally connect you will have the "I'm sorry-are-you-ok?" reaction. It comes with being a decent person I guess.

After a while you get used to the occassional hit while sparring and the only trouble from it is usually to keep a level head and not work up the adrenaline and agression. We've been taught to keep sparring pretty soft and technical and that's where it's fun. You'll usually figure out how hard you can go from partner to partner.

On our level we don't spar elbows and we generally do not make have use of knees outside of clinch (inside of clinch it's really tricky to nail a solid knee). If you're going to kick toward the head or make a knee toward the head you just slow it down even more than the other techniques and your opponent will get a solid chance to react.

If both partners take care of each other in a spar it's my experience that it's good solid fun without injuries but with all kinds of joyous pain.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby eightysevendegrees » Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:07 pm UTC

jbn wrote:If you're going to kick toward the head or make a knee toward the head you just slow it down even more than the other techniques and your opponent will get a solid chance to react.


Kick towards the head? Not going to happen for a while yet. Not unless I'm against someone very short.

Ribs I can manage, but I think I need to get a good deal more flexibility before anyone's head is in danger!

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:24 pm UTC

I'm 2 metres tall and I can (round)kick the height of my own head if I've stretched enough. I've accidentally kicked my pad-holding partner in the jaw, although the fault was his, thankfully he stood up laughing after the initial knockdown. He zoned out, thinking about something else while holding the pads, his arms relaxed and the pads dropped 5 centimetres and my foot slid over the top of the pads and hit him in his face, on his jaw. It wasn't one of my hardest kicks.

Once when I tried to do what the instructor told me and get up on my toes more while kicking I almost put my big toe in my partners ear when I was doing a mid-kick (my mid-height, her face). When I get up on my toes my kicks go up quite a few centimetre. Had a few other moments when a partner has dropped pads at a bad time and I've stopped my leg midair. It's always good fun.

Just glad I'm not one of the guys who've with or without a cup have taken a knee to the groin. It happens. I've had a few frontkicks in the cup, but it handles that commendably.

Edited for clarity.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby Mighty Jalapeno » Tue Jan 20, 2009 11:07 pm UTC

I just joined the forum on MMACanada.net but since they've only got, like, 15 members, I'm not thinking it will help too much.

I just figured I'd post here and say that I've decided to make getting my black belt my goal for the Fit Club. I was an Uki and Sempei back in my leaner days (70 lbs lighter than I am now).

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby 0range » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:37 am UTC

jbn wrote:Once when I tried to do what the instructor told me and get up on my toes more while kicking I almost put my big toe in my partners ear when I was doing a mid-kick (my mid-height, her face). When I get up on my toes my kicks go up quite a few centimetre.


Why in the world would you want to go up onto your toes to kick?
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Wed Jan 21, 2009 9:42 am UTC

In Muay Thai it's not uncommon to get up on your toes while doing a roundkick. The power of the kick comes from the rotation of the hip and I guess some people find better rotation on a smaller surface. There are some odd ways of bending the leg you're standing on while kicking too that I haven't picked up fully. Kicks vary quite a bit between practicioners, but getting up a bit on your toes is pretty general for a Muay Thai roundkick since you pretty much have to lift your heel as you rotate your entire body and the foot your standing on.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby Nath » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:13 am UTC

Do you go onto your toes, or the ball of your foot? The latter makes perfect sense to me. I'm not a striker, but that's the recommended foot position for most throws. If I don't emphasize that, I tend to rock back onto the heel -- I can still rotate, but I'm off balance, and I can't step, or generate much force.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:48 am UTC

Ah, that would be the ball of the foot, yeah. It's sort of tricky to keep the english expression in mind as there's not really a difference according to my native language. In swedish you only really talk about going "up on your toes" regardless if it's on the ball of the foot or on your actual toes, the latter one being a bit rare outside of ballet. And as my instruction is in swedish you might get why I'm speaking of toes.

Ball of the foot, indeed.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby 0range » Fri Jan 23, 2009 12:09 am UTC

I think in English too, excepting ballet, when someone says "go up on your toes", they mean "go up on the ball of your foot". At least, this is how I use the phrase.

So, you go up on the ball of your foot to more easily pivot? Does it not strike you as a particularly vulnerable position to put yourself in? Maybe I'm biased because I dislike kicks aimed above the feet and knees in general because of the instability, but this seems even worse.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby studyinserendipity » Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:25 am UTC

The way it was explained to me, staying up on the balls of your feet makes your kicks quicker because you don't have to pick up your heel to pivot, you can just go for it. Also, it eliminates the 'tell' - if your opponent is watching, they can tell you're going to pivot by your heel lifting. They are both really quick motions anyways, so I'm not sure how legit it is, but that's what I was told.
Re: the balancing issue, I wonder if being 'up on your toes' is actually more stable when you're accustomed to it because you can shift your weight faster and pivot to avoid twisting over your ankle the wrong way. (Again, not an expert, so I'm not sure!)

Edit: I think I misunderstood - prior to the kick, I've been told to be up on my toes, but the heel goes down for most kicks at the point of impact for stability.
Last edited by studyinserendipity on Fri Jan 23, 2009 2:41 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby BlackSails » Fri Jan 23, 2009 2:27 am UTC

Man, every always cuts off the feet in photos.
[img]
http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/024 ... 5/340x.jpg[/img]
[img]
http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/ ... 5_68287675[/img]


But kick however you get the best power, balance and range.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Fri Jan 23, 2009 11:23 am UTC

While kicking, pretty much regardless of the height of the kick (low kicks to the legs being the most likely to hit and the most frequently used from my experience) I believe the momentum of the rotation, the very power of a roundkick, works as a counterbalance. You generally don't have any balanceissues if the kick hits. If it's completely dodged or captured you obviously find yourself in a less balanced position.

Any kick will reduce your balance somewhat, but while kicking most of your weight is on your standing foot, so it's not exactly easy to move.

In our roundkicks (frontkicks are quite different) the goal is to twist your hips and your entire body with them until you're at roughly 90 degrees rotation. Different teachers give a bit of different instruction on the specifics. Some suggest getting up on the ball of your foot with the standing foot. You should also turn that foot as much possible as part of the rotation. One of my teachers also tried to get me to bend the standing leg a bit while kicking. There are a lot of varying specifics, but generally, getting up on the ball of your foot is recommended for the round kick and the reason would be to get a smaller center to rotate about, less friction and possibly a quicker rotation.

There seems to be quite a few different techniques and situations where getting up on your toes is an advantage. Straight knees, mid or high. In clinch grappling you can put more weight on the opponent if you get up on your toes and you can even stay out of knee reach if you clinch well enough, being on your toes helps a lot here and balancewise, it's actually easier to follow the twists and turns of and opponent if you haven't planted your feet so much.

I hope I'm making sense. This is of course all in my experience which isn't extremely long or match-tested. I mostly go by what my teachers tell me.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby eightysevendegrees » Fri Jan 23, 2009 6:01 pm UTC

I took my first foundation grade in kung fu on Sunday and I passed!!!

It wasn't nearly as bad as I was expecting, mainly because it wasn't the head instructor actually doing the gradings. That guy scares me. I spent the train journey there with a couple of people who were going for later gradings and they kept saying such reassuring things as, "If he yells at you that you're weak in the middle of the grading, it doesn't mean you've failed," and, "Don't worry if he shakes his head or buries his head in his hands; he does that to everyone." Fortunately, for the sake of my nerves, the grading was lead by a very friendly woman instead.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby crowey » Sat Jan 24, 2009 12:09 am UTC

well done eightyseven :) I was always terrified before gradings (especially as the gradng centre was right in the middle of a dodgy bit of town, and had no changing rooms so you had to walk 500m from the car park in your white suit trying not to invite beatings from the locals)....

Kicking: I like to keep my whole foot flat, I feel more stable that way, I can't help but think that going right up on the ball of your foot is more just a way to gain kick height without the flexability... Each to their own though, if it works for you I'm not going to argue.

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Sat Jan 24, 2009 2:09 am UTC

Congratulations eightyseven.

We don't have grades, which suits me well. On the other hand, if you want credit among your Muay Thai peers you pretty much have to compete and get some matches done. So I guess I might end up fighting a match before I know it. Especially since everyone's so god damned supportive at the club and I'm a sucker for flattery ("Come on, you'd do great.")
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby 0range » Sat Jan 24, 2009 3:29 am UTC

There seems to be quite a few different techniques and situations where getting up on your toes is an advantage. Straight knees, mid or high. In clinch grappling you can put more weight on the opponent if you get up on your toes and you can even stay out of knee reach if you clinch well enough, being on your toes helps a lot here and balancewise, it's actually easier to follow the twists and turns of and opponent if you haven't planted your feet so much.


Certainly this is true, when you're really trying to put your body behind a knee in a clinch, you may even carry your plant foot off of the ground.

I think I understand better what you mean regarding round-house kicks. It is a difficult subject to write about and leaves much open to misinterpretation. Generally, I have found that a planted foot, bent knee and quick 'snapping' of the hips to generate as much force as I need - that is, my plant foot barely rotates at all. Of course, the higher the kick goes, the more the plant foot needs to rotate. I've never fought under Muay Thai rules though, so possibly you can get away with a less planted foot.

Some good roundhouse kicks here. I think you can see that when he is kicking low, ankle - torso range, he barely rotates at all, but as they go higher, he tends to rotate more.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby eightysevendegrees » Sat Jan 24, 2009 8:13 am UTC

crowey wrote:well done eightyseven :) I was always terrified before gradings (especially as the gradng centre was right in the middle of a dodgy bit of town, and had no changing rooms so you had to walk 500m from the car park in your white suit trying not to invite beatings from the locals)....

I am once more glad that our uniform is nice and discrete. If no one looks too closely at how the trousers do up (they have nothing to fasten them, so you wrap them round at the top and then roll them over like you would if you were trying to get a towel to stay round your waist) you're just someone who happens to have a couple of white cranes sewn on your clothes. With a coat over the top, no one would be able to tell. I can catch the bus and then walk through a dodgy bit of town to the hall where we train without feeling like I'm asking for trouble.

And, jbn, when you say "before you know it," makes it sound like my situation with the grading. "You should go in for a grading soon." "Really? Great." "There's one in four days. See you there."

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby kha-khees » Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:10 pm UTC

eightysevendegrees wrote:
jbn wrote:If you're going to kick toward the head or make a knee toward the head you just slow it down even more than the other techniques and your opponent will get a solid chance to react.


Kick towards the head? Not going to happen for a while yet. Not unless I'm against someone very short.

Ribs I can manage, but I think I need to get a good deal more flexibility before anyone's head is in danger!


Give it a little bit of time (less than you think!) and a decent warm up - you'll be able to snap a straight kick to face height no problem.
Congratulations on your grading, too. :P

Started my 4th year of wing chun last week, granted the first 2 were in the junior class. Had my first sparring lesson last week too, and got clocked on the nose and jaw, but only lightly. It really clears your mind, and is great fun. We only had some gloves and that was it as far as extra protection went, when it gets heavier we'll all definitely be wearing mouthguards though.

We're a pretty small club, with basically 2 groups, a smaller one at the higher level and a larger one at mid-low levels, but we did get another new guy this year, so we might end up with some more newbies! :D

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Tue Jan 27, 2009 2:23 pm UTC

In sparring we wear gloves, shinguards (we kick and parry with the shins, bone against bone can really sting) a cup (most of the guys and a few girls have this good sense) and mouthguard. Shinguards are off when we do padwork. If you're holding the pads the mouthguard can be a good idea, despite the fact that your instructions will sound really weird. "Jabh, closs, wook"
It's gloves and mouthguard in clinch too.

Just to reiterate so people don't have to scroll back to find out what my MA is. Muay Thai.

In the first kind of matches you can go within our club you have a helmet and padded vest in addition to the rest of your sparring gear.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby bieber » Fri Jan 30, 2009 2:51 pm UTC

kha-khees wrote:
eightysevendegrees wrote:
jbn wrote:If you're going to kick toward the head or make a knee toward the head you just slow it down even more than the other techniques and your opponent will get a solid chance to react.


Kick towards the head? Not going to happen for a while yet. Not unless I'm against someone very short.

Ribs I can manage, but I think I need to get a good deal more flexibility before anyone's head is in danger!


Give it a little bit of time (less than you think!) and a decent warm up - you'll be able to snap a straight kick to face height no problem.
Congratulations on your grading, too. :P

Started my 4th year of wing chun last week, granted the first 2 were in the junior class. Had my first sparring lesson last week too, and got clocked on the nose and jaw, but only lightly. It really clears your mind, and is great fun. We only had some gloves and that was it as far as extra protection went, when it gets heavier we'll all definitely be wearing mouthguards though.

We're a pretty small club, with basically 2 groups, a smaller one at the higher level and a larger one at mid-low levels, but we did get another new guy this year, so we might end up with some more newbies! :D


Always wear a mouth guard, even when you're not expecting to get hit in the head. I once took a stray spinning backfist in the mouth...while sparring to the body. Thank God the mouth guard was there :)

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Fri Jan 30, 2009 2:56 pm UTC

Yup.

Shit happens and you'll always be happy that you wore your cup and your mouthguard at some point. I've seen what happens to people who find a cup to be too much hassle. Ouch, crap..

And getting your teeth fixed is seriously expensive. So a mouthguard in sparring is a solid insurance policy.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby crowey » Fri Jan 30, 2009 3:12 pm UTC

Indeed. one of my instructors bit clean through his lip just before christmas, as "it's only a bit of light sparring". He caught a punch right in the mouth and bled everywhere

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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby studyinserendipity » Sat Jan 31, 2009 1:55 am UTC

My jiu jitsu coach had us do 50 push-ups if he caught us with our tongues anywhere near our teeth - he didn't want us biting our tongues off if we suddenly got hit to the chin while grappling. I became really grateful for the mouthguard because it kept my teeth closed.
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Re: The Martial Arts Thread

Postby jbn » Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:58 am UTC

That's the same punishment one of our coaches mentioned last time we sparred but for another cause. The push-ups would be for every hard hit landed during sparring. She wanted it technical and apparently felt some of the more agressive people could benefit from a threat (or a lot of push-ups).
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