Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

The Food Forum's Evil Twin. Trying to lose weight or get in shape? Tips, encouragement, status reports, and so forth go here.
Disclaimer: Unless otherwise stated, we are not health professionals. Take advice with salt.

Moderators: Mighty Jalapeno, Moderators General, Prelates

Rhesonance
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 5:48 am UTC

Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Rhesonance » Fri May 13, 2011 6:58 am UTC

I'm 21, 6'2" and 268lbs and my goal is to reach and sustain 220lbs or lower.

Currently my exercise is limited to a 5 minute bike to the gym, 30 minutes on the elliptical (on 7 elevation and 11 resistance at roughly 120strides/min) and working myself up to the highest point of my university to take a joy ride and glide all the way back to my apartment on Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays at around midnight. I've started doing this around 2 weeks ago with no significant change in weight. However, my average heart rate while exercising has dropped from 195 to 170.

I want to expand on my gym routine, something along the lines of alternating days of weight training and cardio (via the elliptical), but I know nothing about weight training. I also have no upper body strength to speak of (I can bench around 140lbs, barely half my weight). I want to focus on upper body since my legs and thighs are buff enough from having to carry around my bulk all day. :roll:

I almost always prepare all my food for myself and I tend to eat around 10am, 12:30pm, 4pm, 8pm, 12am. Generally along the lines of cereal, salad, pasta, soup, sandwich, respectively. My cereals are a mix of a sugary cereal and a healthy cereal (Capt'n Crunch + Fiber One currently) on skim milk. My salads are romaine lettuce + red cabbage + carrot + dressing + chicken. Pasta is pasta. My soups tend to be pretty hearty with chunks of meat, potatoes, thickened with flour, etc. My sandwiches are ham/tuna/chicken with a slice of lettuce and enough light mayo to thinly coat one side of the bread. If I were to roughly estimate I'd say this totals 400+400+600+500+400 = 2300. I eat a cup of Yoplait's fat-free yogurt whenever I feel the need to hold myself over between meals (around 1-2 per day) and drink 3-4 cups of various fruit juices throughout the day. So all this together adds up to ~2700 calories a day. I drink around 1.5L of water on non-gym days and 2.5L on gym days. I replace butter in recipes with olive oil when I can and I replace olive oil with wine when I can. I only eat multi-grain or whole wheat bread. I only buy lean ham, trimmed chicken breasts and water-packed tuna. I go for drinks and dinner with friends about once a week. This diet I've been following around 8 months.

My sleep is highly erratic, but I get my 8 hours a day... on average. It's generally closer to a cycle of 6-10-6-10 etc. I wake up around 10am-2pm, sleep at around 2am-5am. I've been like this as far as I can remember.

I already know two weaknesses in my daily routine are the irregular sleep patterns and the 12am meal. I sleep whenever I get tired and I usually wake up without an alarm. I feel like I need to eat at around midnight or my stomach growls while I'm laying in bed and keeps me up.

This said, I would like to know more about weight-training and suggestions to help with the two problem areas I've identified, as well as any other changes the collective intelligence that is the XKCD forum deems wise. I have a supermarket, a convenience store, an organic farmer's market and a gym all within a reasonable walking/bicycling distance. I am not after a short-term result, I want to fall into an overall healthier lifestyle so nothing too drastic that would be too time-intensive or difficult to follow as the years go by. :)

Thanks in advance. :D

User avatar
Solt
Posts: 1912
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:08 am UTC
Location: California

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Solt » Sun May 15, 2011 1:44 am UTC

Rhesonance wrote:and drink 3-4 cups of various fruit juices throughout the day. So all this together adds up to ~2700 calories a day.


No way 3-4 cups is only 400 calories. No way. A big guy like you is going to drink more than 8 ounces of juice at a time. 8 ounces of orange juice has up to 120 calories (more calories per ounce than regular soda!), which is almost 500 calories for 4 8 oz cups, so I'd say that's what you're drinking minimum.

Honestly, you are drinking an equivalent of 2-3 cans of soda a day. That's terrible. If you can cut that out and not change the rest of the diet (ie, not eat appreciably more), then I think you'll have no problem losing weight. Of course you still need some fruit so if you can replace each cup with 1 *actual* fruit, you'll be golden. Keep in mind that a 8 oz cup of OJ is something like 3-4 oranges? something like that? You don't need that much sugar. Fruit juice is the enemy of weight loss. It makes you think you are doing something healthy, but it's worse than soda.

The rest of the diet looks great. Pretty unprocessed (except for the cereal, which is ok), no cheese, no heart attack foods, no fatty meats. In fact I think if you start working out too hard you're probably going to have a lack of energy, but maybe not and even if so you can address that down the line. Oh, the one exception is pasta- kind of defeats the purpose of eating whole wheat bread, since it is just as digestible as white bread. If cutting out OJ isn't enough, the next place to look is the pasta. Otherwise, your diet is very good. Just a few more tweaks should give you the results you want.

As for weightlifting, I'd suggest squats. Not because they build leg muscles, but because they beat the crap out of you. Really tough energy consuming exercise. Check out http://www.stronglifts.com In general you want to do big compound exercises using barbells- you shouldn't waste time with biceps curls or any machines.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,
produced a more reliable product. But sailors do
not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a
most annoying habit of splitting in two."
-J.W. Morris

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3148
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Nath » Sun May 15, 2011 2:42 am UTC

I agree about fruit juice. It's easy to put away a crazy amount of liquid calories without noticing it. I'd replace the cereal with oatmeal, and maybe a couple of eggs. Fat is not evil. For the late-night meal, try yogurt (preferably unsweetened Greek) or cottage cheese. Maybe with a bit of fruit to make it less boring.

For weight training, I'd suggest Starting Strength. Some of that information is available online, but yes, the book is well worth it. I'd recommend against focusing on the upper body vanity lifts; train the whole body as a unit, and strength will appear where it needs to.

User avatar
Ulc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:05 pm UTC
Location: Copenhagen university

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Ulc » Sun May 15, 2011 7:23 am UTC

Rhesonance wrote:I already know two weaknesses in my daily routine are the irregular sleep patterns and the 12am meal. I sleep whenever I get tired and I usually wake up without an alarm. I feel like I need to eat at around midnight or my stomach growls while I'm laying in bed and keeps me up.


Actually, no.

The juice (as others has said, juice is basically liquid sugar) is the biggest problem. Your estimate of 400 kcal in 3-4 cups of juice are quite low, it's at least 500, probably loser to 800. If you can't cut it entirely, limit yourself to at most 2 cups in a day, but the best would be to cut it out entirely and replace it with a fruit snack, and water. Lots and lots of water.

I'm going to suggest that you do not start lifting weights just yet. At 125 kg without being used to exercise - odds are that your joints are going to be a problem quite soon, and my experience is that free weights are murder on the joints. I'd suggest some bodyweight (http://www.functionalbodyweightexercises.com/All-Bodyweight-Exercises.html) exercises combined with doing tabata intervals* (keep a bucket handy), then in half a year when you have lost 20kg and your joints have been strengthened a bit, you should definitely take up free weights.

If you do take up weights anyway, don't focus on your upper body - focus on things that work out your entire body. Squats, overhead presses, deadlift.


*Absolutely max intensity workout for 20 seconds, 10 seconds rest, repeated 8 times. Yoǘ'll discover the use for the bucket by yourself.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it - Aristotle

A White Russian, shades and a bathrobe, what more can you want from life?

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3148
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Nath » Sun May 15, 2011 7:46 am UTC

Ulc wrote:I'm going to suggest that you do not start lifting weights just yet. At 125 kg without being used to exercise - odds are that your joints are going to be a problem quite soon, and my experience is that free weights are murder on the joints. I'd suggest some bodyweight (http://www.functionalbodyweightexercises.com/All-Bodyweight-Exercises.html) exercises combined with doing tabata intervals* (keep a bucket handy), then in half a year when you have lost 20kg and your joints have been strengthened a bit, you should definitely take up free weights.

Ulc, have you had a bad experience with free weights at some point? I've noticed you've advised several people not to start weight training, because 'it's murder on the joints'. Lots of people of all fitness levels have benefited from free weights, including the elderly, the sedentary, the overweight, and the underweight. Correctly done free-weight exercise will improve joint health: joints adapt just like anything else. Of course -- with bad form, all bets are off. That's why I suggested buying a book explaining correct form in detail, rather than just getting some info off the Internet. Better still would be to find some good coaching in person, but without a bit of background knowledge, it's hard to tell a good coach from a snake oil salesman.

Bodyweight exercise is great, of course, but free weights are more scalable and controllable. You can't switch into a half-sized body for a quick set of pull-ups. However, you can squat and press with a small amount of weight -- just the bar, if necessary -- and work your way up at a pace you can handle. Seems much more beginner-friendly to me.

Also, I love Tabata intervals, but they aren't something you want to start cold turkey.

User avatar
Ulc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:05 pm UTC
Location: Copenhagen university

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Ulc » Sun May 15, 2011 8:23 am UTC

Nath wrote:Bodyweight exercise is great, of course, but free weights are more scalable and controllable. You can't switch into a half-sized body for a quick set of pull-ups. However, you can squat and press with a small amount of weight -- just the bar, if necessary -- and work your way up at a pace you can handle. Seems much more beginner-friendly to me.


The scalability of free weights is actually a major reason that I wouldn't recommend it early, because it's so easy to add weight at a pace that's just a little faster than what you can handle.

And if your joints are weak it doesn't take very many sessions of form that is slightly off combined with too much weight, before a injury is a reality - and that takes quite a long time to heal. If good form and good pace is followed, then you're of course completely right, but often actually archiving good form is actually hard by itself if you're out of shape. That's the benefit of body weight exercises in the beginning in my opinion, harder to pace yourself into a injury by accident.

But yes, I've seen a number of friends fall into that trap and end up with a bummed knee that took 3+ months to heal.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it - Aristotle

A White Russian, shades and a bathrobe, what more can you want from life?

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3148
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Nath » Sun May 15, 2011 8:52 am UTC

Hm. Depends on the person, I guess. If you trust yourself to keep your ego in check, I'd say the scalability of free weights is an advantage. But someone trying to do too much too soon, yeah, that can lead to problems. Forsooth, barbells are the UNIX of strength training.

User avatar
Ulc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:05 pm UTC
Location: Copenhagen university

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Ulc » Sun May 15, 2011 10:48 am UTC

Nath wrote: If you trust yourself to keep your ego in check


It's not just about ego, it's also about not knowing how your body feels when you're exercising rightly, compared to how it feels if you're doing it wrong. I see lots of starting advise that recommends putting on 5 pounds each time you work out in the beginning - but if your joints are developing slightly slower, you might never notice that you should only have used 4 pounds more per exercise session, before you have earned a injury when you hit being 10 pounds ahead of what your joints can handle.

It's standard knowledge that for strength training to be worth anything, some slight damage must be done to the tissue - but it's not exactly easy to explain the difference between how good damage feels, and how bad damage feels. So both ego (which should *very* much be kept in check!) and lack of intimacy with your own body during physical stress is a danger.

Basically, I've never met anyone where the progress in the joints have been able to keep up with the progress in muscles, and joint injuries are so damn common that I really think one ought to be as careful as possible, even if it leads to a somewhat slower progress - the progress will be held back much more by not being able to go to the gym for three months than by doing body weight for three months.

(That is not to say that it is a stupid idea to start weight training, merely that I'm paranoid about joint injuries, and very much advocates a "better safe than sorry, even if it leads to slower progress" approach to getting fit)
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it - Aristotle

A White Russian, shades and a bathrobe, what more can you want from life?

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3148
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Nath » Sun May 15, 2011 11:16 am UTC

For a typical untrained beginner, the limiting factor is not muscle or 'joints'. It's neural adaptation. When you start out, you don't know how to ask your muscles to generate large amounts of force, so any weight you can pick up is light enough that you don't really need to worry about injury (again, barring terrible form). If you put on a little too much weight, that doesn't mean you're going to get injured. All it means is that you might fail a rep or two, and set it down on the pins. That's OK; you are still handling small weights, so this is quite safe. (Done sensibly, it's quite safe even at relatively high weights.) By the time you are handling a significant amount of weight, you've been training for a few weeks, and have a sense of what your body can do.

Who are these people you know who get all these joint injuries lifting weights? What is their programming? Where did they learn their form? I read a lot of strength training logs, all the way from complete beginner to elite level strength athletes, and joint injuries aren't particularly common. Sometimes someone gets a sore knee or wrist, makes a form adjustment, and it goes away. Injuries bad enough to interrupt training are quite rare compared to other sports I follow and participate in. High intensity low-rep training is actually a pretty safe way to work.

Of course it's good to take reasonable precautions to avoid injury, but the human body is not such a fragile thing. As long as you learn the right mechanics early on, it's not only OK but actually essential to push your limits if you want to make continued progress.

Rhesonance: sorry for derailing your thread. Let us know if you want us to shut up :).

User avatar
Solt
Posts: 1912
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:08 am UTC
Location: California

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Solt » Sun May 15, 2011 9:06 pm UTC

I think it's solid general advice for any physical activity to NOT let your ego take control. If you add too much intensity too fast, you will hurt yourself. It doesn't matter if it's free weights, running (I've gotten close to hurting myself pretty badly by going too far too soon... my lungs could handle it but my legs were not ready), biking, swimming, basketball, whatever.

With that in mind, I don't think free weights are any different. You are just as likely to get hurt as if you start running 5k. If you've never done any kind of serious activity, you need to take it very slowly, listen to your body, give extra time to recover between workouts, and only increase weight when your current weight literally bores you. Oh, and pay attention to technique. Also stay away from machines. If you take these steps, you probably won't get hurt.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,

produced a more reliable product. But sailors do

not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a

most annoying habit of splitting in two."

-J.W. Morris

User avatar
gaurwraith
Posts: 285
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:56 pm UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby gaurwraith » Mon May 16, 2011 2:01 pm UTC

There's no way I can believe real OJ is worse than soda.
I am a lvl 89 sword barb

User avatar
Ulc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:05 pm UTC
Location: Copenhagen university

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Ulc » Mon May 16, 2011 2:15 pm UTC

gaurwraith wrote:There's no way I can believe real OJ is worse than soda.


Energy wise, it's worse

Orange juice: 45-48 kcal/100ml (depending on brand)
Cola: 43 kcal/100ml

True, there is actually a bit of vitamin C in orange juice, but very few people in developed countries get insufficient amount of vitamin C, even if they don't drink juice.

Overall, soda is probably a bit worse, but only because it's awfully harsh on the teeth.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it - Aristotle

A White Russian, shades and a bathrobe, what more can you want from life?

Rhesonance
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 5:48 am UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Rhesonance » Mon May 16, 2011 11:02 pm UTC

Ulc wrote:
gaurwraith wrote:There's no way I can believe real OJ is worse than soda.


Energy wise, it's worse

Orange juice: 45-48 kcal/100ml (depending on brand)
Cola: 43 kcal/100ml

True, there is actually a bit of vitamin C in orange juice, but very few people in developed countries get insufficient amount of vitamin C, even if they don't drink juice.

Overall, soda is probably a bit worse, but only because it's awfully harsh on the teeth.



I actually mix juice with carbonated water, which I suppose is better than straight juice, but I suppose I can switch over to just a squeeze of lime. Works out better in the end anyways, juice is expensive and I have a lime tree! I'll be sure to get some unsweetened Greek yogurt to try next time I'm at the store, though it doesn't sound very good... will probably mix bits of fruit in it. Thanks for the suggestions so far, everybody!

User avatar
Ulc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:05 pm UTC
Location: Copenhagen university

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Ulc » Tue May 17, 2011 10:26 am UTC

Rhesonance wrote: but I suppose I can switch over to just a squeeze of lime. Works out better in the end anyways, juice is expensive and I have a lime tree! I'll be sure to get some unsweetened Greek yogurt to try next time I'm at the store, though it doesn't sound very good... will probably mix bits of fruit in it. Thanks for the suggestions so far, everybody!


A squeeze of lime juice + water taste good, and while there's certainly more calories than in water, it's still very much on the healthy side - especially if it means you can get to 3-4 litres of water per day.

As for unsweetened yoghurt - give it a couple of weeks and you wont even miss the sweetness. The overly sweet things that society is so used to is by and large a force of habit. And nothing wrong with mixing in bits of fruit in it, sure, it's more calories, but if you take your diet to the point where it taste of nothing, the only thing that is going to happen is that three weeks from now you you'll binge on something unhealthy and give up on the diet. Far better to mix in a small handful of berries in unsweetened yoghurt along with a cut up apple.

The last thing to mention is the breakfast - cereal very rarely is a good idea. Even the "healthy" ones are chuck full of quickly digested carbs and nothing else.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it - Aristotle

A White Russian, shades and a bathrobe, what more can you want from life?

Rhesonance
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 5:48 am UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Rhesonance » Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:08 am UTC

Update: Last time I went to the gym was a month ago since it was finals time at school and now I'm home and don't have access to my school gym anymore. I go for a 3 mile or so walk once in a while but still don't burn as many calories as I did at the gym. To compensate for the decrease in exercise I decided to start counting calories to serve as a motivator to eat less. So far I have: 3400, 2550, 1500, 3000, 2800, 2400, 1000, 2450 and 1400 which isn't bad considering my maintenance intake should be around 3000-3400 according to various calculators I've found online. I just weighed myself in on my home scale and got 256, but I'm not sure how much I trust it seeing how the dial only goes to 270. Going to see a physician/nutritionist tomorrow to discuss possibly going on a medically supervised VLCD over the summer. I'll keep you guys updated!

EDIT: Yeah, fail scale, I was around 263.
Last edited by Rhesonance on Fri Jul 01, 2011 10:25 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

JonoEPD
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:45 am UTC
Location: Davis, California
Contact:

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby JonoEPD » Tue Jun 28, 2011 5:11 am UTC

Rhesonance wrote:I'm 21, 6'2" and 268lbs and my goal is to reach and sustain 220lbs or lower.

Currently my exercise is limited to a 5 minute bike to the gym, 30 minutes on the elliptical (on 7 elevation and 11 resistance at roughly 120strides/min) and working myself up to the highest point of my university to take a joy ride and glide all the way back to my apartment on Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays at around midnight. I've started doing this around 2 weeks ago with no significant change in weight. However, my average heart rate while exercising has dropped from 195 to 170.

I want to expand on my gym routine, something along the lines of alternating days of weight training and cardio (via the elliptical), but I know nothing about weight training. I also have no upper body strength to speak of (I can bench around 140lbs, barely half my weight). I want to focus on upper body since my legs and thighs are buff enough from having to carry around my bulk all day. :roll:

I almost always prepare all my food for myself and I tend to eat around 10am, 12:30pm, 4pm, 8pm, 12am. Generally along the lines of cereal, salad, pasta, soup, sandwich, respectively. My cereals are a mix of a sugary cereal and a healthy cereal (Capt'n Crunch + Fiber One currently) on skim milk. My salads are romaine lettuce + red cabbage + carrot + dressing + chicken. Pasta is pasta. My soups tend to be pretty hearty with chunks of meat, potatoes, thickened with flour, etc. My sandwiches are ham/tuna/chicken with a slice of lettuce and enough light mayo to thinly coat one side of the bread. If I were to roughly estimate I'd say this totals 400+400+600+500+400 = 2300. I eat a cup of Yoplait's fat-free yogurt whenever I feel the need to hold myself over between meals (around 1-2 per day) and drink 3-4 cups of various fruit juices throughout the day. So all this together adds up to ~2700 calories a day. I drink around 1.5L of water on non-gym days and 2.5L on gym days. I replace butter in recipes with olive oil when I can and I replace olive oil with wine when I can. I only eat multi-grain or whole wheat bread. I only buy lean ham, trimmed chicken breasts and water-packed tuna. I go for drinks and dinner with friends about once a week. This diet I've been following around 8 months.

My sleep is highly erratic, but I get my 8 hours a day... on average. It's generally closer to a cycle of 6-10-6-10 etc. I wake up around 10am-2pm, sleep at around 2am-5am. I've been like this as far as I can remember.

I already know two weaknesses in my daily routine are the irregular sleep patterns and the 12am meal. I sleep whenever I get tired and I usually wake up without an alarm. I feel like I need to eat at around midnight or my stomach growls while I'm laying in bed and keeps me up.

This said, I would like to know more about weight-training and suggestions to help with the two problem areas I've identified, as well as any other changes the collective intelligence that is the XKCD forum deems wise. I have a supermarket, a convenience store, an organic farmer's market and a gym all within a reasonable walking/bicycling distance. I am not after a short-term result, I want to fall into an overall healthier lifestyle so nothing too drastic that would be too time-intensive or difficult to follow as the years go by. :)

Thanks in advance. :D


Heya,

As a guy who was literally in the same position as you exactly a year ago (6'2'' and 275 lbs and major high blood pressure issues...could barely walk around a small campus) and now doing a lot better (195 lbs and no blood pressure problems, bike 7-15 miles a day), maybe I can add some insight here. As a person with no nutrition background, maybe not.

conciousness_stream.begin()

Note that whether or not you lose weight is very dependent on the amount of calories you consume. You can eat the friggin healthiest things in the world, but if you're eating 3000 calories of it a day, it won't change your weight (it will make you more healthy, of course!). Your diet seems to me to reflect this a bit.

Also, I found that one of the hardest psychological obstacles to losing weight/workouts was when I moved, or ate too much one day, or did something otherwise wrong. Very demotivating, and caused me to move up and down weight wise for a month or two. The solution that worked for me was to log everything I ate and count the calories, ensuring that I stayed under a target number on average. If I went over, I could make up for it over the following days by eating a bit less. It's of course better for you to just eat the target, but again...a nice recovery option :).

Another piece of advice...I'm a vegetarian, salads with dressing are my BANE OF EXISTENCE!!!! They kinda ruin the point of eating the salad in the first place. I found that replacing them with things like olives, beans, etc. with a bit of 'juice' made for a very tasty and effective antidote. Perhaps something to give a whirl :). I dropped 20 lbs in 2 months after stagnating + continued to gain muscle mass through this change alone.

Biking is an amazing thing. I'm easily distracted (sounds like you may be a bit better than I!), so I started going to supermarkets that were farther away from my apartment. I don't know what kind of time scales you're looking at, but buying only enough food that you have to go back to the market every day or so + going to a farther away market makes 'skipping' days impossible. For the rest of exercise, the more accessible the better. I could never motivate myself to go to the gym every other day...miss a week and then I'm done for a month, until I get interested again. I don't have this problem with push ups, pull ups, and basic weights @ home...wake up in the morning and spending 10-15 minutes on some basic stuff is much easier than biking 5 minutes to do the same thing!

Just a few ideas, hope something helps! If your sleep cycle is a bit better than mine (I get usually 5-6 hours on weekdays and 0-10 on weekends) I'm sure that will help too :p. Sounds like your making great progress already, so, ftw and keep going, even when it gets tough :)

conciousness_stream.end()

Rhesonance
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 5:48 am UTC

Re: Getting into a healthier and more fit lifestyle

Postby Rhesonance » Fri Jul 01, 2011 10:16 am UTC

JonoEPD wrote://snip


Yeah, I realized that eating healthy doesn't mean eating lean. I went from cheeseburgers with fries twice a day in high school to home-made meals 4-5 times a day and I just stayed the same weight. I got my lab results back a few days ago and my doctor remarked I'm healthier than most people of normal weight.

I've been using that market trick for a while but with different rules (must walk there and may only spend $5 or less per trip). I started counting calories 3 weeks ago (was still at 268, hadn't made any progress at all) for a week just to see how my days were coming along. The first few days were in the 3000-3500 range! It's amazing how much you can eat without realizing it. Second week I was down to 2200 and third week I was in the 1800 range.

After talking to my physician, I was given the green light to take on a diet of ~600 calories a day with vitamin supplements for the duration of the summer to lose the weight fast and worry about keeping it off later. I was warned I would feel weak and light headed on a diet this low in calories but it has been a week and I feel perfectly normal! I'm currently eating 125 calorie meals consisting almost entirely of lean protein (baked chicken breast, 1% fat ground turkey meat balls, etc) with a very large salad (with no dressing) 3 times a day with a 50-60 calorie fruit snack between meals. I've also increased my daily walk by 2 miles. So far, a week into this diet and exercise regimen I've dropped an almost alarming 6lbs. Doctor said around 5lbs/week is the safe upper limit, after wards medical complications may start to come up; I may need to relax my diet a bit.

I am currently 256 and I'm aiming for 210 by the time school starts again in late September and by my calculations, I'll get there a few weeks early even after I'd taken into account weight loss slows down as daily caloric needs decrease due to decreased weight.

The major concerns my doctor and friends are pointing out to me is the difficulty of the life changes required at the end of the diet to prevent it from all just coming back. But after living a week on 4700 calories (yes, yes, I went 500 over, sue me) and never feeling hungry, it feels as if a new door has opened for me; if I can be happy on 670 calories a day, surely triple that amount per day once my diet is over wouldn't be remotely difficult to manage -- just like how I gave up fast food and soda 4 years ago. At first I had to resist, but, given enough time I just naturally started picking healthier food choices without thinking about it. I already made an important step to improving the quality of my food, now the only step left is to optimize the quantity.

So all in all I do feel I will make a positive change over the summer and the rest of my life.

Thank you, Jono. It helps greatly to know about specific others who've been in my situation before and have kicked fatness in its lardy ass. You can be the After and let this post be a testament to the process. All you Befores that are reading this, you can do it! :P (But please don't put yourself on a diet like mine without consulting a physician first.)


Return to “Fit Club”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests