Teachers that cannot teach

The school experience. School related queries, discussions, and stories that aren't specific to a subject.

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paddy
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby paddy » Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:26 pm UTC

At school we had a biology teacher that didn't believe in evolution. This is not unheard of in Northern Ireland, which as a society is far too religious and a little fundamentalist, but come on. She was teaching A-level students while letting her own convictions interfere with the material. Naturally, some of the more sensible students took her apart with their questions and destroyed her credibility, but really, she shouldn't be working.

Actually, we had a few crap teachers. Like the geography teacher who routinely failed to mark test papers and occasionally took afternoons off to play golf. Or the Design and Technology teacher who could get lost in an empty room and fixed exam results to hide the fact that he couldn't teach - people who'd made a complete arse of the paper often found themselves with a high mark. Or the History/Business Studies teacher who was, to borrow a phrase from Interesting Times, "so far round the bend he couldn't poke sanity with a long pole".

Lerning in my school must have taken place by way of osmosis, or something. It certainly wasn't through the teaching.

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electronic mily
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby electronic mily » Wed Sep 03, 2008 3:35 pm UTC

Hm, let's see. In seventh grade we had Mr. A, a social studies teacher who was famous for not really knowing what he was doing. I don't remember ever actually learning anything in the class, most assignments we turned in were old ones with the titles changed, and there was at least one incident when we had a substitute and ended up watching a movie the teacher had left... which turned out to be an hour or so of explanation on how the Roman emperors had sex with young boys and filled their palaces with statues of naked men. When April fools day came around the guy was mercilessly "fooled," although half of the time he didn't notice. There was the time when everyone went over to sharpen their pencils and then snuck out, which he didn't notice until there were only about five people left in class. There was the time we all took our shoes off in his class, which he didn't notice, and the subsequent time when we all put our shoes under his desk, which he didn't notice, and the subsequent time when we all wore our shoes on our hands, which he finally noticed after about twenty minutes. There was the time when everyone stood up every time he said "uh," which resulted in his standing in the front of the class nervously going "Uh. Um... I, uh... uh... The, um... Uh..." as the class bounced up and down like a whackamole game.

He had some kind of a personal vendetta against a guy named Tom, who was blamed every time he heard someone talking. Near the end of the year Tom got fed up and yelled, "I didn't say anything!" and was sent to the office. He slammed the door on the way out, and Mr. A got a look on his face like something had gone horribly wrong with the inner workings of his brain, and then he bellowed, "GET OUT!" and flung the textbook and clipboard he was holding clear across the room.

So, ah, this has deviated a little from what I was saying in the beginning, but the point is that the story of Mr. A's bizarre breakdown will live forever in the memories of everyone involved.

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Sarr
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Sarr » Sun Sep 14, 2008 2:19 pm UTC

paddy wrote:Lerning in my school must have taken place by way of osmosis, or something. It certainly wasn't through the teaching.

Yes, I can see that.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Orangeyness » Mon Sep 15, 2008 1:37 pm UTC

My current IT teacher has no idea what teaching is, or computers...

I'm in the "advanced" year 11 IT class at my school and we have the worse teacher I have ever been inconvenienced with. He hasn't taught us anything this year instead hes just been chucking worksheet, after worksheet at us. When we ask for help on a question he rarely knows the answer and ends up suggesting we do some independent research on the topic. When we were doing a topic on HTML and CSS he made all of us use the designing section of frontpage... FrontPage :cry: . He didn't teach the class anything at all about HTML and CSS... instead he gave us a worksheet about how to use frontpage. You won't believe how degrading that is for me after being taught html in IT for the past two years, and being able to design fully functional websites using HTML, CSS, php, javascript, etc. And when it came to the test most of the class was confused as hell because it asked them to attach a CSS file.

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Sartorius
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Sartorius » Sun Oct 05, 2008 1:52 am UTC

I am taking a business class, and I must say, I loathe business classes. This one certainly isn't worth my time, but it's required. The professor uses the PowerPoint slides that came with the book and then proceeds to read them to us. I would just not show up to class, but he has an attendance requirement. At least I have a friend in there to help keep my sanity.
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Cynical Idealist
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Cynical Idealist » Sun Oct 05, 2008 5:24 pm UTC

Insignificant Deifaction wrote:Our teachers do nothing about a student having their face kicked in.

One up'd.

My math teacher once threw a kid out of the classroom. Well, it was more "picked up and dragged," but still. However, I maintain to this day that he was the best math teacher I have ever had, because he kept it engaging.

Spoiler:
To the kid involved: when a teacher tells you to get out of his classroom and go to the Dean's office, the proper is not "Are you going to make me?"

Because Happy Hendie is going to say, "yes." Then, he's going to be forced to resign and we get a shitty replacement teacher and the school is out its best teacher.


Back on subject: in middle school, there was a theology teacher who couldn't teach, and kept me through lunch so I could type up her handwritten stuff. I may be a fast typist, but I am not a secretary. In high school, there was another theology teacher who couldn't impart knowledge at all. There was also another theology teacher who got information across, but it was all totally useless information. I have the worst luck with theology teachers. At least I haven't run across one so far in college!
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby cwoodin » Mon Oct 06, 2008 4:32 am UTC

Kithplana wrote:Gyahhh. This term we students somehow weren't privileged enough to know who the instructors are for our classes, and we get to find out who they are on the first day of class. This is really irritating because if we want to transfer to a different class we have to do so after the term has already started. My first class was supposed to be Thursday, but I was just informed of who the teacher is -- one of the most incompetent in the school. Now I have to get my class switched to a different schedule so I don't get this guy, which is going to add an additional day on to my school week and really mess with my schedule: on Thursdays I'll have a four-hour class at 7:30 AM and another four-hour class at 6 PM.

...Staying somewhat on topic, said teacher is infamous among the students. Apparently you leave his classes knowing more about colobus monkeys than the subject he was supposed to be teaching for the past nine weeks. Seriously... lectures on monkeys.

Edit: He even looks like a colobus monkey.


I get the feeling one of the reasons they didn't tell you who taught the class was so that you didn't transfer based on who your teacher is..
He said he never tells a lie!
He was lying about that.

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Snowdream
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Snowdream » Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:01 am UTC

I had a teacher in my High School who was the first teacher to put me to sleep. It was my Senior year, and my god... the man has a monotone voice which just killed me. What's killer; he had no passion.

I'm sorry, but please do not teach if you do not have passion for this job :(.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Master Gunner » Mon Oct 06, 2008 9:28 pm UTC

A new teacher at my school recently dared the class where we put all the people with no chance of passing to throw paper airplanes at him.


....Seriously, what did he think was going to happen?

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Cryopyre » Tue Oct 07, 2008 10:41 pm UTC

I have a physics teacher. He gives us book work as a form of teaching and his only job is answering questions. But more than this, he's just a bitter old man (one who I expect may just be a sociopath). It's hard to put in words just what a douche-bag he is, but I can assure you he is far worse than many teachers on here.

Far.

Worse.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby apoklips » Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:17 am UTC

My World Issues teacher is unqualified to teach the course, which I'm pretty sure he mentioned at one point. Apparently, they let him teach it because he was passionate about politics. I don't think, at the time, they knew he'd learned everything he knows about politics from Billy Bragg and Bad Religion songs. He also shows conspiracy theorist propaganda as part of the curriculum, and all the kids eat it up and regurgitate everything as fact, despite the fact that he often tells them to challenge every text they see. It wouldn't be bad if it weren't for the kids swallowing it whole and acting like experts on whatever the topic was afterwards.
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embernator
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby embernator » Thu Oct 30, 2008 12:30 pm UTC

My math prof for the first month of the semester couldn't teach. She obviously knew what she was doing and had a doctorate in math, but she didn't speak english very well. A lot of time was wasted with her trying to figure out what words to use, and quite often she'd go off talking about her research instead of teaching us what we're supposed to know. By the time the scheduled prof rotation (we've got three math profs, three math classes, so they each teach each class for 1 month) came around, 85% of the people who had dropped math by that point were from my class, and only about 15 people (out of the 60 in my class) were actually passing. So 4-5 years from now, when my class graduates, we're gunna have a whole year of engineers in Nova Scotia who don't know how to do calculus.

theSleepingMan
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby theSleepingMan » Sun Nov 09, 2008 4:28 am UTC

I don't really like my math teacher. The dude's a football coach at school or something like that and I think the only reason he's teaching math is so that he can coach. (Requirement at my school that if you want to coach, you have to teach.) The classroom environment just feels kind of restrictive and while he gets along greatly with students that he knows through athletics, the rest of us are left feeling kind of meh about him. I don't really pick up much either from his teaching, by which he puts examples on the board and demonstrates to us. I would ask questions, but the guy kind of intimidates me. (I always have that problem with sports coach teachers, they come off as a little intimidating. Made Health class a hell for me.) In the end, I usually pick up more from the book itself than from him, which is kind of a weird reversal for me.

I also don't really get what all this work is for. Yeah, I can do it, I can know what this type of math is called, but how the hell can it be used? Can't he at least make it relevant? To me, it's just a bunch of funny arrangements of numbers a letters that you have to sort out in just the right way. They have little pictures and captions in the book that give you a brief summary of how some people might use this in a job, but it doesn't really impart that much onto us, as we don't even discuss it. It's just, "Do this problem, then move onto the next one". Definitely doing as little math as possible in college. :(
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Wright
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Wright » Mon Nov 10, 2008 2:20 pm UTC

My physics teacher failed his year 12 physics course, yet decided to become a physics teacher. Instead of teaching us physics, he reads a bit out of the book, and says "Now you can do the questions". It doesnt help when instead of teaching, he talks to people about freaking black magic in India, or when he talks about other random stuff and tells the people who are working to stop screwing around. Because of him, from the 30people who did physics in year 11, only 12 continued through to year 12.

MY G+T teacher is equally as bad. He knew so little about the subject that almost the whole class failed, and wasn't able to help anyone with any questions they had. Only help he ever gave was to look at the examples, which are only useful for the first 5 or 6 questions at most.
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Ashi
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Ashi » Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:57 pm UTC

I've had a few in high school. One was my earth science teacher, who made very pathetic mistakes, such as, when teaching us how to add time, adding the numbers wrong, and the like. She's known to be one of the worst in the school, but she makes up for it by being incredibly nice to students.

Another I had last year, before switching out of the class and up a year in Spanish. Our Spanish teacher was new, and could not keep a hold on the class to save her life. Students wouldn't listen or learn anything, and regularly have breakfast parties in the back of the room without her noticing. Partway through the year, after I got into a higher level Spanish class, she was fired, and sued the school, thinking it was because she was pregnant. The damage control that the other teachers had to do was pretty bad; the lady even decided to take all of her sick days before her date of firing, screwing the school out of money by making them get substitutes.
Lisa Chiariello, if anyone wants to look it up.

I've had quite a few more good teachers than bad ones, though. My school is pretty awesome about hiring.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Guy Fawkes » Wed Nov 12, 2008 8:27 am UTC

I've been having problems with my English teacher this year.

First off, let me give a little backstory. I'm a senior in a college preparatory high school and consider myself a bit smarter than the average bear (although the average bear is fairly dumb mind you). I took AP English Language last year and scored a "5" on the exam, which for those unfamiliar, is the top score and reserved for about the top 10% of students who take the exam each year. So I would rate myself at least competent within the field of English and a voracious reader outside of school.

I wanted to take AP Literature this year, but my guidance counselor (who is a useless paper pusher anyways) advised me not to. He said that there were a lot of books to read, and the homework would be overwhelming. I had signed up for 6 of my 7 periods in AP courses anyways (which give an extra GPA point, so A is 5.0, B is 4.0, etc... to show level of relative difficulty to Honors, which gives 0.5 of a GPA point extra) so, he claimed, going from AP to Honors English will still give you academic rigor but not take up so much time. I was adamant, and started on my summer assignments, but my parents and the counselor pressured me over the summer and eventually I acquiesced and downgraded.

Little did I know at the time what a mistake I was getting into.

Our school offers only AP and Honors English. Apparently, AP is for the "achievers" and Honors is for the "underachievers". It had been acceptable to segregate students into one of the two categories for every subject at the beginning of the high school process. I had fortunately been mushed with other "achievers" - some kids who are genuinely smart, but also some kids who are sycophants, cheaters, under extreme pressure, or very lucky. This had spared me from the atrocious education my peers were receiving, drilled into them year after year. In fact, once you were on a track it was nigh impossible to leave it. Honors English I kids took Honors English II, AP English III, and AP English IV (Literature). Regular English I kids took Regular English II, Honors English III, and Honors English IV. The students transition to honors courses in name, but not in quality - our school has simply given in to the grade inflation that is pandemic. There was an incredible difference between AP and Honors, certainly much more than the arduous-sounding names would suggest.

I got assigned a teacher names Miss Braaten, who'll I refer to as Ms. B from now on. She collected summer assignments on the first day of class - which I had not been made aware were a requirement for Honors kids also. I explained that I had changed classes over the summer and hadn't received such an assignment, and requested extra time to complete the assignment. Of course Ms. B denied me, but I endeavored to present myself as a desirable pupil and earn her favor. The first several assignments were creative writing assignments which we peer-reviewed. Reading the other assignments, I was certain I'd receive an A for my lengthier (and much better written - these kids were interjecting "I" into hypothetical narratives) writings, but none of the class received the work back or was even made aware of what our grades were. The class descended after that. Ms. B dictates note-taking of the most painstaking of tasks. We had to take notes on the middle ages and learn about Anglo-Saxons for days (much of the learning consisted of video, tangent discussions, and obvious facts like "they built castles" or "there was a medieval hierarchy - Kings, Queens, etc..."). The entire first month seemed entirely arbitrary - we received vague notetaking grades based on how much obvious information we regurgitated about a well-known time period and were given a handful of creative writing assignments that were wrenched dry of merit through lack of feedback or seeming value.

I became increasingly disillusioned until we had to read our first book - Beowulf. The work wasn't so bad, but was seriously abridged and excerpted. Ms. B had us define the "vocabulary" words in our readings, but they were so dumbed-down that it was astonishing any teacher would spend days forcing kids to write definitions for "pilgrimage" and "murky," Class was either a series of pointless questions from the book "Which character is your favorite?" that went unread into the trash bin or a plot synopsis session where Ms. B would describe the characters and plot as she saw it. However, since she only tested us on her washed-up half-an-hour synopsis and her painstakingly simple vocabulary, I wonder why she even made us read the book in the first place. A few weeks of this boring garbage and we moved onto the culminating project - a Beowulf comic/poster. We spent a week making an 8-panel comic to fit her rubric for color and creativity. You see, she grades you on creativity but actively seeks to stifle it in the classroom. Can we change the Beowulf fight scene to make it more interesting? No. Can we make it "Gangsta Beowulf?" No. In the end, she took most of the week off anyways, so my partner and I worked hard to produce a colorful Beowulf comic to suit Ms. B's tastes. We lost some points because my partner spoke less than I did during the presentation. I pointed out to Ms. B that Beowulf naturally had more speaking parts in the comic than other characters and so since we read different characters, inherently one of us would speak more than the other. She replied apathetically "It's a few measly points, don't worry about it," I was deeply discomforted by this, as she had taken points off both of our grades for an inherent quality, and then nonchalantly brushed off student grades that would affect them for years to come.

Class meandered along - as her workload with other classes became increasingly full Ms. B gave more "free-reading days" where we were graded if we brought along a novel (my non-fiction Charles Murray book was no good) in our backpacks in case we had to read that class period. The number of these days was ridiculous, but at least they spared us from mountains of busywork. We started on Geoffery Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," sometime late October. By now, I suspect she somewhat liked having a student that offered humorous quips and was naturally verbose and proficient in English - one less little rat to teach. She called on me incessantly to read my journal entries because I used multi-syllabic words. Nonetheless, "Canterbury Tales" was miserable.

First we spent a day creating a study guide out of a page-long biography of Geoffery Chaucer. The questions she required us to answer were "What was Chaucer's nickname?" The first sentence of the biography was "Geoffery Chaucer is known as the father of English poetry." Nowhere did it give a nickname, but I diligently wrote down this little epithet since this was obviously what she wanted. We spent another day peer-grading these guides while she worked on other classes' papers. To no student's surprise, everyone scored a 100%. The test on Chaucer was joke - What year did Chaucer write the Canterbury Tales? I wrote "late 1300's," but apparently she wanted "1370" because that helps me understand the literature. Regardless, the whole test was peer-graded, so I didn't even get a chance to make my point.

The worst affront came last week. She said that Chaucer intentionally made characters good or bad. The Miller is greedy and overprices his customers, so Chaucer disapproves of this character. I disagreed. I asked if Chaucer was really so black and white and explained that I felt he was neutral in his language but just omniscient as a narrator and revealed all facets of a character to the reader to give the depth of a complex person, fighting between impulse and morals. She contended that she was right, but didn't use evidence - It was assumed she alone knew Chaucer's objectives. I rebutted that Chaucer relied entirely on rhyme, but didn't use syllabic meter, synestasia, metaphors, etc... that would have allowed the author more leeway in creating "stock" good and bad characters. Thus, his writing can be taken more at face value and the neutral language is evidence. Further, I contended, just because a Monk hunts doesn't mean he has renounced his church vows or that Chaucer hates the church and surreptitiously seeks to mock it. She then suddenly turned very angry and told me to stay after class. My classmates and I didn't understand what crime had been perpetrated.

After class, Ms. Braaten told me that my opinions confuse people and that she was not expected to listen to 10-minute rambling rants that challenge her teachings. I apologized and said that I had thought that as an English teacher she would appreciate a literary discussion. She told me that was very rude to say and that I had a rude "tone" in my voice that she wanted out. I was confused, so I asked what specifically upset her. She responded, "The tone," so I asked what words I used that upset her. She again responded, "The tone." I asked what would have made my discussion less intrusive and asked politely for reiteration as she was being vague*. She exclaimed, "That's the tone I'm talking about!" I pointed out that my opinions weren't meant to be rude, and that I merely had dissenting opinions. She finally stated "If you can't say it in a minute, don't say it at all!" and implied that I would be losing substantial "participation points," her method of allowing complete subjectivity in grading. She left me feeling completely frustrated.

The day after that she took another weeklong trip to California - bringing her absence record up to about 3 weeks. We got the most dumbed-down worksheet I had ever seen. It made me sick at heart. If I can swipe a copy, I'll scan one in, because this is completely unbelievable.

The questions on the worksheet consisted of (and I'm not shitting you - I'm a 12th grade senior in Honors English at an academy-type school that prides itself on academic rigor) questions like: "The dogs (were/was) running." Circle one. "A gentleman comes in through the door." Change "a gentleman" to "the gentlemen". This honestly made my AP English friends very sad at the blatant busywork shoved in our faces. How is this supposed to prepare us for college?

Sorry if this was a little long-winded, but I absolutely despise this teacher.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Torvaun » Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:32 pm UTC

Guy Fawkes wrote:<snip>

Sorry if this was a little long-winded, but I absolutely despise this teacher.
If you can't say it in a paragraph, you shouldn't say it. *runs*
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Lleu » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:53 am UTC

Once I had a chemistry teacher who spent a good twenty minutes trying to solve a=b/x for x. I heard that he recently got fired for sexual harassment or something.

My friend's statistics teacher assigned a crossword puzzle.

And my psychology teacher was unaware that object permanence started at about eight months and who also managed to calculate my friend's grade incorrectly. Also, my pre-calc teacher last year said "I don't really understand this, but I'm retiring so it's okay."

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby DrProfessorPhD » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:21 am UTC

I have two teachers, that for lack of ability to teach, have the students go to the front of class and do the work on a projector while the teacher 'dictates', usually getting the assignment wrong. Initially, it was just my Introduction to Computers class (one of those prerequisites that I take as part of a high school college class scholarship.) Now, my HS Accounting 1 teacher is making one of the students go up and do the work. It's just terrible.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby fishyfish777 » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:56 am UTC

MY ENGLISH TEACHER SPEAKS WITH A FUCKING SPANISH ACCENT

>.>

Oh, and my computer class teacher. Luckily, he assumes that everyone has a WPM average of around 1 word per minute, including him (goddamn keyboards have furballs and grease under the keys and half the keys don't fricking work so you have to take the keys, avoid touching the big furball, and reassemble the sticky greasy spring, ugh), so I can just type up a report in around 2 minutes, turn it in, and spend the rest of the time on XKCD fora.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby thatguy » Thu Nov 13, 2008 4:54 am UTC

Had a Chem/Physics teacher that insisted we wrote out every itty bitty part of our equations. Example:

You have 30 g Na and .05 kg Cl. When combined under optimal conditions, How much will be produced?

My answer:
"Na is limiting reactant. 30 g."

apparent needed answer:
" .05 kg x 1 kg/1000g = 50g, 1Na + 1Cl = 1NaCl, 30Na + 50Cl = 30NaCl + 20Cl"


Nevermind that I answered the freaking question and gave justification for that answer. God, he was retarded.

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syckls
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby syckls » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:01 pm UTC

thatguy wrote:apparent needed answer:
" .05 kg x 1 kg/1000g = 50g, 1Na + 1Cl = 1NaCl, 30Na + 50Cl = 30NaCl + 20Cl"



The methodology of that is entirely false. You have to convert to moles before you can find the limiting reactant.

30 g Na / (23 g/mol) = 1 mol Na
.05 kg Cl * (1000 g / 1 kg) = 50. g Cl / (35 g/mol) = 1.4 mol Cl

At this level of precision, we cannot be sure whether the sodium or the chlorine is the limiting reactant. The 30 g Na measurement could actually be the result of measuring 34 g of sodium, in which case 34 / 23 = 1.5 is greater than 1.4, and chlorine is the limiting reactant. Did you leave off any decimal places when you posted this problem?
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby xtehchifro » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:43 am UTC

Ugh...my science this year, Ms. X, has absolutely no teaching ability whatsoever. She goes off on random tangents, like talking about sewage plants and the recycling of urine when we're supposed to be learning about fractional distillation. She takes off points for no reasons on all assignments--my friend had 12 out of 42 points deducted just because he used the color yellow when making a graph. :x

She has no idea what she's talking about either. She gives us random worksheets and expects us to teach ourselves the material...which is impossible, because the worksheets don't teach you anything and have nothing to do with the textbook.

I dread taking the midterms...we'll have to identify some "mystery substances". I've heard from upperclassmen who had her class freshman year that she takes off an entire letter grade if you identify one substance incorrectly. :evil:

She's turned my love for science into hate for the subject. :x

Spoiler:
On a positive note though, my math teacher this year is absolutely wonderful. She's enthusiastic about the subject, clearly knows the material, and has great explanations if somebody in the class doesn't understand something. My love for math has grown even more, thanks to her. :D

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Ashi » Fri Nov 14, 2008 9:19 pm UTC

Guy Fawkes wrote:<information that makes me lose faith in humanity>

Sorry if this was a little long-winded, but I absolutely despise this teacher.


Oh dear goodness. I truly feel sorry for you. I've never had an experience quite as bad, but I've had close, and that was disheartening enough. I wish you luck in making it through the course, sincerely.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby ST47 » Sun Nov 16, 2008 3:01 am UTC

thatguy wrote:Had a Chem/Physics teacher that insisted we wrote out every itty bitty part of our equations. Example:

You have 30 g Na and .05 kg Cl. When combined under optimal conditions, How much will be produced?

My answer:
"Na is limiting reactant. 30 g."

apparent needed answer:
" .05 kg x 1 kg/1000g = 50g, 1Na + 1Cl = 1NaCl, 30Na + 50Cl = 30NaCl + 20Cl"


Nevermind that I answered the freaking question and gave justification for that answer. God, he was retarded.


I hope you just mistyped the kg/g conversion factor, and that your teacher wasn't THAT retarded.


So, Physics. Honors Physics, even. My entire class is failing. We're all seniors. Most of us show up to class. Interestingly, the teacher thought that since I'm the only one with an A+ average, I would be able to 'rehabilitate' the two students who don't show up to class. So he assigned them to me for our second semester design project. Where we use a computer program to design and load test bridges. One of them can't seem to understand why we should be using the computer program to work on the project. He would rather make the most expensive, heaviest bridge possible, and then blame the computer program when it reveals that his hunk of steel won't even stand under its own weight.

The class average is bad.

Our first test (chapters one and two, vectors, scalars, two-dimensional vector math, one-dimensional kinematics) was really bad. I didn't have much trouble with it, but I'm the sort of person who would take two science and math classes in the same year. Someone asked why we can't use v=x/t for vertical motion. And then went on to discuss that with the teacher for most of a period.

We've now taken two tests and a quiz and then spent two weeks building and testing catapults. Even though we're a few chapters behind. The first test was thrown out. He's offered a very simple 25 extra credit points on the second test. Still, the average grade is really bad.

I like this teacher. We make catapults and bridges. We spend time discussing black holes and the LHC. He's also got some issues going on, so it's not entirely his fault. But you'd think a teacher would realize that it's BAD when most of your class is failing.

I've got a pretty good set of teachers this year, I like my physics teacher, despite the opinions of the rest of the class. The only teacher who doesn't like me is my English teacher, but his one true love is William Shakespeare. That and Phys Ed, but what else is new.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby thatguy » Mon Nov 17, 2008 4:08 am UTC

Yeah, I bungled that example badly. But it was still a point for each conversion factor not shown, for each little thing not explicitly written out. It was crap.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Christopher » Mon Nov 17, 2008 5:55 am UTC

Because I suck and should diaf and all that . . .

Teachers who cannot teach

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Mr.RobLikesBrunch » Mon Nov 17, 2008 8:48 pm UTC

I've never had one, at least, one that was significant.

Ever since ninth grade, and since I've had both the maturity and intellect to judge my teachers, all of them have been reasonably good and quite a few have been fantastic teachers. I go to an international private school in Switzerland, so that may contribute to the fact that my teachers are very good. You'll see this in many private schools, simply due to the incentives that private education provides to the faculty. In public schools, your performance is irrelevant- you get paid by how long you've been teaching, not by how good you are at it. As a result, many of the most talented teachers leave the profession or never enter it, simply because there are better rewards in other areas of work. In private schools, teachers are hand-picked, and generally of much higher "quality" as the private schools are a privately owned businesses that must compete with other schools, thus, creating incentives for the school to get better teachers, and in order to do so, they may offer better salaries based on performance, or may only hire very well qualified teachers.

Education is one of the only government-regulated "business" left in the United States, and you can see how the quality of service completely degrades as incentives diminish.

So yeah; that's my input...thought I'd put an economic twist on it. :)

Anyway, in 11th grade now, and every single one of my teachers can teach well, and knows the subject incredibly well as well.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Ashi » Mon Nov 17, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Mr.RobLikesBrunch wrote:I've never had one, at least, one that was significant.

Ever since ninth grade, and since I've had both the maturity and intellect to judge my teachers, all of them have been reasonably good and quite a few have been fantastic teachers. I go to an international private school in Switzerland, so that may contribute to the fact that my teachers are very good. You'll see this in many private schools, simply due to the incentives that private education provides to the faculty. In public schools, your performance is irrelevant- you get paid by how long you've been teaching, not by how good you are at it. As a result, many of the most talented teachers leave the profession or never enter it, simply because there are better rewards in other areas of work. In private schools, teachers are hand-picked, and generally of much higher "quality" as the private schools are a privately owned businesses that must compete with other schools, thus, creating incentives for the school to get better teachers, and in order to do so, they may offer better salaries based on performance, or may only hire very well qualified teachers.

Education is one of the only government-regulated "business" left in the United States, and you can see how the quality of service completely degrades as incentives diminish.

So yeah; that's my input...thought I'd put an economic twist on it. :)

Anyway, in 11th grade now, and every single one of my teachers can teach well, and knows the subject incredibly well as well.


That's an interesting way of looking at it. My school has incredibly good teachers, in general, and it's a public school. Every vacancy in a teaching position here gets from 150 to 200 applications, so my school can be quite selective. Public schools don't have it that bad, in that sense. I've only had one "bad" (where bad equates to making many errors, and generally lacking knowledge in his or her general subject) teacher here, and she made up for it by being kind and lenient in grading. It seems to me that people underestimate the quality of a lot of things in the United States.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Mr.RobLikesBrunch » Mon Nov 17, 2008 9:32 pm UTC

Ashi wrote:
Mr.RobLikesBrunch wrote:I've never had one, at least, one that was significant.

Ever since ninth grade, and since I've had both the maturity and intellect to judge my teachers, all of them have been reasonably good and quite a few have been fantastic teachers. I go to an international private school in Switzerland, so that may contribute to the fact that my teachers are very good. You'll see this in many private schools, simply due to the incentives that private education provides to the faculty. In public schools, your performance is irrelevant- you get paid by how long you've been teaching, not by how good you are at it. As a result, many of the most talented teachers leave the profession or never enter it, simply because there are better rewards in other areas of work. In private schools, teachers are hand-picked, and generally of much higher "quality" as the private schools are a privately owned businesses that must compete with other schools, thus, creating incentives for the school to get better teachers, and in order to do so, they may offer better salaries based on performance, or may only hire very well qualified teachers.

Education is one of the only government-regulated "business" left in the United States, and you can see how the quality of service completely degrades as incentives diminish.

So yeah; that's my input...thought I'd put an economic twist on it. :)

Anyway, in 11th grade now, and every single one of my teachers can teach well, and knows the subject incredibly well as well.


That's an interesting way of looking at it. My school has incredibly good teachers, in general, and it's a public school. Every vacancy in a teaching position here gets from 150 to 200 applications, so my school can be quite selective. Public schools don't have it that bad, in that sense. I've only had one "bad" (where bad equates to making many errors, and generally lacking knowledge in his or her general subject) teacher here, and she made up for it by being kind and lenient in grading. It seems to me that people underestimate the quality of a lot of things in the United States.


I went to Middle School in the States before moving...didn't want to include it as an example as although I thought my teachers were good, I don't really feel I knew enough back then to properly judge.

There are exceptions to any generalization- human behavior is unpredictable (now I'm really getting carried away with the economics). Anyway, I'm sure there are also schools with absolutely horrible educational practices/teachers....think about very poor areas. I'm assuming here, but I would be surprised if there wasn't any truth behind assumptions. But then again, I'm sure that if you compared the SAT scores of private schools to public schools, you'd see that private schools all scored quite a bit higher.

Anyway, the basic point here is that there is a lot of room improvement; improvement which should have been made a long time ago and is becoming ever-more apparent.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Pit » Tue Nov 18, 2008 10:24 pm UTC

Ashi wrote:
Mr.RobLikesBrunch wrote:I've never had one, at least, one that was significant.

Ever since ninth grade, and since I've had both the maturity and intellect to judge my teachers, all of them have been reasonably good and quite a few have been fantastic teachers. I go to an international private school in Switzerland, so that may contribute to the fact that my teachers are very good. You'll see this in many private schools, simply due to the incentives that private education provides to the faculty. In public schools, your performance is irrelevant- you get paid by how long you've been teaching, not by how good you are at it. As a result, many of the most talented teachers leave the profession or never enter it, simply because there are better rewards in other areas of work. In private schools, teachers are hand-picked, and generally of much higher "quality" as the private schools are a privately owned businesses that must compete with other schools, thus, creating incentives for the school to get better teachers, and in order to do so, they may offer better salaries based on performance, or may only hire very well qualified teachers.

Education is one of the only government-regulated "business" left in the United States, and you can see how the quality of service completely degrades as incentives diminish.

So yeah; that's my input...thought I'd put an economic twist on it. :)

Anyway, in 11th grade now, and every single one of my teachers can teach well, and knows the subject incredibly well as well.


That's an interesting way of looking at it. My school has incredibly good teachers, in general, and it's a public school. Every vacancy in a teaching position here gets from 150 to 200 applications, so my school can be quite selective. Public schools don't have it that bad, in that sense. I've only had one "bad" (where bad equates to making many errors, and generally lacking knowledge in his or her general subject) teacher here, and she made up for it by being kind and lenient in grading. It seems to me that people underestimate the quality of a lot of things in the United States.


My high school worked in a similar fashion. Our positions are rather competitive, and a lot of people want to work in my high school.

Despite this, my school seems to have a knack for choosing teachers who know their subject back and front, and yet are terrible teachers. My physics teacher, for example, was very knowledgeable about physics and electronics. However, she was simply a bad teacher. Nice woman, good physicist, bad teacher.

I feel that there are more teachers who are bad teachers, then there are teachers who don't know their subject.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby BigBoss » Sun Nov 23, 2008 6:02 pm UTC

we had a substitute in our psycology class one day, and instead of giving us our homework he spent an hour of a 90 minute class talking about eskimos
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby thatguy » Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:18 am UTC

We had our Composition teacher substitute is Psych one day and the Teacher, my Friend, and I ended up bashing Twilight for like 30 minutes, despite most of the class groaning to get off the subject. Epic fun.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Angelic Hellraiser » Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:57 am UTC

[offtopic] I once towel-whipped a kid in the face with my shirt for saying Twilight is gay, saying, "Dude, I'm a Twilight fan. You don't say that to us."[/offtopic]

My 8th grade teacher was horrendous. She would teach the material, but then try to associate it with some sort of song or something which made us more remember the song than the actual material. My friend and I were going to tell her how much of an aweful teacher she was at the end of the year, but ended up not doing it.

I liked her during English class, though. All we did was write and read what we had written.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby Timequake » Mon Nov 24, 2008 1:36 am UTC

My 8th grade science teacher really didn't teach us much, just had us read from the textbook and then gave us open-book, open-note quizzes so that we didn't actually have to know anything in order to get high grades.
There is one English teacher in my high school, although I have never been in one of his classes, who just seems utterly stupid from what I've heard from friends. He's told classes that such things as "9/11 was the first and only attack on American soil by a foreign power", or that Huckleberry Finn was written by Frederick Douglas. He also gives them interpretations of literature so shallow, and often so utterly nonsensical, that I couldn't imagine a student passing any class (except his) by interpreting literature in a similar way (his explanation of the first conversation in The Crucible was literally that Puritans are hypocrites because they think people can fly).
There's another one, a Biology teacher who just retired, who knew the subject matter very well, but couldn't explain it well, and would often become confused and tell his students things that were completely false or not related to the subject at hand. He also had some trouble with the mathematics of grading and, from what I'm told, seemed to hold grudges against students who corrected him when he made mistakes.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby notxmania » Mon Nov 24, 2008 4:26 am UTC

My Language Arts teacher does not teach. At all. So far this year, she has done nothing that counts as actually teaching. A typical day goes like this:
1:Make a 5-sentence long journal entry.
2:Read newspaper.
3:Pick 2-8 (depending on day/mood/senility) articles to write about.
4:Answer 6 simple, universal questions about each article.

I'm in middle school, so I'm sure I shouldn't expect much, but still.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby josephoenix » Mon Nov 24, 2008 6:19 am UTC

I had a freshman english teacher who not only couldn't teach, but was an idiot. The school had messed up my scheduling when i was enrolled in high school, and i was stuck in remedial classes. Basically, they had me repeat the eighth grade [8th grade honors = 9th grade remedial] and then in 10th grade, they got their act together, and stuck me in honor's classes. [which is really 11th grade remedial... so i guess i skipped all the 10th grade remedial/9th year honor classes. I never had to read hamlet.]

Anyway, my 9th grade English teacher wasn't used to having children with my intelligence level, and she felt threatened by me. Mostly because i'd point out whenever she'd spell things wrong or use words improperly. I couldn't stand her, because she hated me because i was the only one who knew she was an inferior teacher. That, and she had a god-complex. Can't stand those.

I had another bad teacher, my AP Physics teacher. But he was inept for other reasons: he was too smart. He couldn't understand how we were not on his level. he only ever had one way of explaining things, and if you didn't understand his one way, you're SOL. I did manage a 3 on he AP test. Not too good, but for the first time i was just glad i didn't fail.
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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby ac1983fan » Sun Nov 30, 2008 1:42 am UTC

My geometry teacher was really, the worst math teacher I have ever had.
First of all, she just wouldn't really teach the material. She would give us note packets, and she would tell us what to put in the blanks, but she never really explained anything. When we went over the homework, she would just ask us what problems we had trouble with, and she would than show the problem and answer with work on the board, but she never explained what or why things were done.
Plus she picked very obvious favorites. And she was really ditzy. Oh, and this was an Honors course also. I know about three or four students in my class who failed. The only reason I passed is because math comes naturally to me.

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby still-alive » Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:38 am UTC

Mr nelson....

Spanish teacher, 9th grade. nothing was learned at all, and the dolt somehow put pictures of him and his wife on the projector. Pictures that should not have been on a work computer.I am not makeing this up.(yes he was fired the following year)

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Re: Teachers that cannot teach

Postby still-alive » Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:52 am UTC

Oh and 10th grade algebra 2. I get an 80 on the mid term, I then go up and prove to her my answers are right, and hers wrong, and wind up with a 100. It is like this on all the exams.I got a 84 on the final, which I know I couldn't have possibly gotten lower then a 90 on(it was all trivial), but cant fight that one once grades are fixed. I got thrown out once for pointing out that "1/3 = 1/2" which she wrote on the board was not true, for "disrupting the class".


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