I have an awesome textbook

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Manial
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Manial » Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:50 pm UTC

VTHodge wrote:What's the problem with that? Is it the fake cereal names? The fact that it says "5 ate sugar" (or is that just a typo). Or was the question unclear? It seems to be asking, "if you pick two students from this population, what is the probability that both ate cheeries?".

(4/22)*(3/21) = 2.6%


Oops, I was talking about the fact that 5 people apparently ate nothing but sugar for breakfast :)

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Antimatter Spork » Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:58 pm UTC

TheTankengine wrote:
Antimatter Spork wrote:
lowbart wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:the University of Florida ... Florida State University, the archrival.


I really wish American universities would get a little more creative.

What really sucks is when universities are named after places that they aren't in. I think there's a Miami University in both St. Louis and Ohio (or at least one of them. I don't really remember, and I'm far too lazy to go look it up).

Miami University is in Oxford, OH. There is no MU in St. Louis, but there is a "Washington University in St. Louis", in St. Louis.

Yes. That is what I was thinking of.
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Endless Mike
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Endless Mike » Wed Jan 23, 2008 4:17 pm UTC

Miami University is actually named after the area, since it's in the Miami River Valley, which is named after a pair of rivers that were named after the Miami Indians who used to live there. It's just unfortunately also the name of a fairly major city many miles away with its own university.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby wing » Wed Jan 23, 2008 4:30 pm UTC

Endless Mike wrote:Miami University is actually named after the area, since it's in the Miami River Valley, which is named after a pair of rivers that were named after the Miami Indians who used to live there. It's just unfortunately also the name of a fairly major city many miles away with its own university.

Good. Now explain the American University of Kurdistan.
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby mspickle » Wed Jan 23, 2008 6:56 pm UTC

Um.....going back a few posts ago....Miami IS in OHIO- I graduated from Miami of Ohio.

The Miami Indians moved from Florida to Ohio. I think they went up the Mississippi River, which also explains the St. Louis location.

I feel vindicated now, thankyouverymuch.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby SecondTalon » Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:09 pm UTC

VTHodge wrote:It's likely that you meant "more Beat than Hippie", but I really like the phrase "Beat that Hippie". It sounds like a fun schoolyard game.


You know.. the N key is.. um.. in the neighborhood of the T key. Sorta.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby TheTankengine » Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:24 pm UTC

mspickle wrote:Um.....going back a few posts ago....Miami IS in OHIO- I graduated from Miami of Ohio.

Yes, this has been covered.

mspickle wrote:The Miami Indians moved from Florida to Ohio. I think they went up the Mississippi River, which also explains the St. Louis location.

There is no Miami University in St. Louis.

mspickle wrote:I feel vindicated now, thankyouverymuch.

I, however, do not feel vindicated. I am still left wondering why people feel it necessary to post some information that has already been posted, though.
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Endless Mike
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Endless Mike » Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:32 pm UTC

wing wrote:
Endless Mike wrote:Miami University is actually named after the area, since it's in the Miami River Valley, which is named after a pair of rivers that were named after the Miami Indians who used to live there. It's just unfortunately also the name of a fairly major city many miles away with its own university.

Good. Now explain the American University of Kurdistan.

Kurds <3 America

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby afreak » Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:12 am UTC

I recently discovered this gem in my Japanese text book from first year (of course, translated):

Girl: Tonkatsu? Is it fish?
Waitress: No. It is not fish. It is meat. It is very good.
Girl: Sure! I will take it.
...
Girl: Where is the bathroom?
Waitress: Uh. It's over there.


Somehow I couldn't stop laughing when I realized what had happened there.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby '; DROP DATABASE;-- » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:17 am UTC

Most of my textbook-related laughs come from errors in the book or things I (sometimes even others) have written in them. I like adding ridiculous questions like "37. Translate this book into German." or "28. Calculate the slope of every line ever."

I had an English book, IIRC, with one or two perverted lines in it, but I can't remember them. :(
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Rippy » Wed Jan 30, 2008 4:17 am UTC

Eps wrote:The best opening sentence to any textbook I have ever read was to States of Matter, by Goodstein - the set text for my first graduate statistical physics course:

David Goodstein, in States of Matter, wrote:Ludwig Boltzmann, who spent much of his life studying statistical mechanics, died in 1906, by his own hand. Paul Ehrenfest, carrying on the work, died similarly in 1933. Now it is our turn to study statistical mechanics.

That's kind of disturbing. But also extremely awesome.

I don't have any cool textbook gems, but I've gotten some pretty funny physics questions on tests this semester. The teacher absolutely hates cats. He uses a plush cat tied to a noose to demonstrate wave types, kicks it around to demonstrate forces and motion, etc. Some test questions were:
"A cat jumps off a cliff of its own free will at 5m/s. [...]" *clipart clearly depicts a person kicking a cat off a cliff*
"Fluffy loved to jump through hoops, even at the edge of a 50m cliff. [...]" *with picture*

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Kineticka » Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:18 am UTC

My Anatomy and Physiology book is written by Saladin. o_o

It's very well-written. I haven't found any outright jokes, but there are a few sections that make me smile. I'm in the section on the origins of the huge anatomical/physiological vocabulary.

"The word testicles literally means "little witnesses." The history of medical language has several amusing conjectures as to why this word was chosen to name the male gonads."

"Elephantiasis is a disease that produces an elephant-like thickening of the limbs and skin. Many people misspell this as elephantitis; if such a word existed, it would mean inflammation of an elephant."

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby afreak » Thu Jan 31, 2008 5:47 am UTC

Kineticka wrote:My Anatomy and Physiology book is written by Saladin. o_o

It's very well-written. I haven't found any outright jokes, but there are a few sections that make me smile. I'm in the section on the origins of the huge anatomical/physiological vocabulary.

"The word testicles literally means "little witnesses." The history of medical language has several amusing conjectures as to why this word was chosen to name the male gonads."

"Elephantiasis is a disease that produces an elephant-like thickening of the limbs and skin. Many people misspell this as elephantitis; if such a word existed, it would mean inflammation of an elephant."
Sounds like the whole meaning behind menstrual, which somehow translates loosely into "moon cycle".

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Re: I have an awesome textbteook

Postby Gladjaframpf » Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:36 pm UTC

My Grade 12 Physics textbook was great. Sadly, I can't quote from it directly because I don't have it any more, but some of the questions were hilarious.

For conservation of momentum, we worked with an exploding turkey. In the chapter on special relativity, they explained time dilation and length contraction using the example of a duck on a train traveling at 0.9c while looking at his stopwatch and eating a plate of spaghetti. There were lots of other good ones, but I seem to have forgotten all of them. :(

The duck appears in examples in pretty much every chapter. Next to the diagram of a standing wave is the duck, standing and waving, with the caption "Another kind of standing wave". Now that I think of it, I should find someone who has the book so I can photocopy that picture.

What made it even more awesome was that my teacher was one of the authors. On one wall of the classroom was a large poster of the duck.

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Shadic
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Shadic » Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:56 pm UTC

Straight from a reading I was assigned a few weeks ago:

Image

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby '; DROP DATABASE;-- » Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:59 pm UTC

I just noticed something interesting, though not humorous, about my math book. I haven't counted to be sure but I swear half the people in the pictures are Asian. O_o
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Julie » Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:38 am UTC

afreak wrote:Sounds like the whole meaning behind menstrual, which somehow translates loosely into "moon cycle".

Except that makes perfect sense, as the menstrual cycle is heavily influenced by the moon cycle. Both happen once every 28 days, barring any medical conditions/drugs to change that.

These aren't exactly jokes, but, my math book has a picture of Alice in Wonderland on the front. She is listening to an iPod, and there are extremely trippy tie-dyed colors all around her. There is also a mushroom on the spine. The title of the book is "Adventures in Mathematics" or something, I'll look it up later and see if I can post a cover photo. It's basically the best textbook cover ever.

In my biology text, one of the questions is "why is it unlikely that you will encounter a two-ton predatory cell walking along the sidewalk?" Basically, the question-maker just wants to know why cells don't get that big, but had a fun way of asking it. :)

My teacher dubbed my old English book the "ethnic diversity book" because the more foreign/hard to pronounce a name was, the more frequently they used it.

In my current English text, there's a question about whether Scratchy Wilson from The Bride comes to Yellow Sky is a latent homosexual, and if so, the implications that would have on the story. My English teacher and I agree; Scratchy is not gay and he does not have a man-crush on Jack Potter.
http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/pu ... aBrid.html <-- there's the full text, if you're curious. It's not too long.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby ZeroSum » Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:46 am UTC

My quantum book had an image of a live cat on the front and a dead (sleeping) cat on the back.

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Eps
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Eps » Wed Feb 06, 2008 2:35 am UTC

ZeroSum wrote:My quantum book had an image of a live cat on the front and a dead (sleeping) cat on the back.

Griffiths? A few books have used the cat on the cover, but Griffiths is the most well-known. Although, now I think about it, the cat might have been climbing the 'ladder' on there...

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Ieatsoap6 » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:04 am UTC

A calc book I have has a picture of a graph with a saddle point in the section explaining them. And then to explain the "saddle" part they have a picture of a monkey riding the graph. It's excellent.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby LittleChrist » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:17 am UTC

In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:19 am UTC

LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


I hope the line "Bring me my sword, ho!" was in bold.
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Ieatsoap6 » Wed Feb 06, 2008 4:15 am UTC

LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


Did it have a gun fight in it?

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby bbctol » Wed Feb 06, 2008 5:19 am UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


I hope the line "Bring me my sword, ho!" was in bold.

I am being forced to read this in an English class of immature people right now. Shakespeare uses the interjection "Ho!" a lot. And it's funny every time.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby joeframbach » Mon Feb 11, 2008 6:36 am UTC

bbctol wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


I hope the line "Bring me my sword, ho!" was in bold.

I am being forced to read this in an English class of immature people right now. Shakespeare uses the interjection "Ho!" a lot. And it's funny every time.


I've gotta be honest. I LOL'd.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Endless Mike » Mon Feb 11, 2008 5:01 pm UTC

Ieatsoap6 wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


Did it have a gun fight in it?

In my 12th grade AP English class, our final big assignment for the year (post AP tests) was a skit of King Lear. Traditionally, these skits brought out the worst in every class. One year had a simulated blow job complete with facial. So my group decided to make ours the bloodiest, goriest thing we could do. So we turned all the sword fights into gun fights using squirt guns with red dyed water, and got sticky eyeballs (think those sticky hands...only eyeballs), which we covered in fake blood, and threw at the walls. Last I saw, the blood trails were still there.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby wst » Mon Feb 11, 2008 6:08 pm UTC

Endless Mike wrote:
Ieatsoap6 wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


Did it have a gun fight in it?

In my 12th grade AP English class, our final big assignment for the year (post AP tests) was a skit of King Lear. Traditionally, these skits brought out the worst in every class. One year had a simulated blow job complete with facial. So my group decided to make ours the bloodiest, goriest thing we could do. So we turned all the sword fights into gun fights using squirt guns with red dyed water, and got sticky eyeballs (think those sticky hands...only eyeballs), which we covered in fake blood, and threw at the walls. Last I saw, the blood trails were still there.


I wish we were still studying Othello now :(

That MTV thing sounds like that Baz Luhrmann film, only with English in a modern environment, instead of Shakespearian in a modern environment (Which fitted very well, and loathe I am to say this, but I liked that film)
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Kallisti » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:42 am UTC

IronyandParadox wrote: Waitwaitwaitwait! Halliday Resnick Walker? But...that's my book! My book doesn't have any of those amazing problems of awesomenss.
Dang. I have the 7th edition. Still, I get the feeling that the entire physics department is conspiring against us and giving us only relatively normal problems. As in, no political science majors.
*goes back to studying for physics midterm*


I have the 6th edition, and we call it Hallnicker (although I'm not entirely sure on that spelling). It's got some pretty good problems, and also a thing for penguins. Now some of the penguin problems and examples wouldn't be so notewothy in themselves, except for the fact that they're absolutely. everywhere. in this book. Don't tell me the penguins are minimised/gone in later editions?

A non-penguin problem:
Page 928: "Standing beside railroad tracks, we are suddenly startled by a relativistic boxcar traveling past us as shown in the figure [figure not terribly important right now]. Inside, a well-equipped hobo fires a laser pulse from the front of the boxcar to its rear. (a) Is our measurement of the speed of the pulse greater than, less than, or equal to blah blah blah I'm sick of typing and the rest of it's not much good.

There's also stuff about space battles involving lasers, and pirate ships. And 500kg spheres with 1mm radii.

On page 66 there is a problem involving a "cream tangerine." I can not find any people or websites that know what a cream tangerine is. The book suggests it is something that can be thrown past the side of a building.

Page 85 says that "the rest of this chapter consists of sample problems" and "you should pore over them." Being pretty early in the book and early in the school year, this didn't feel the least bit foreboding. Not at all. (I promise it looks worse on the page than it does when I write it here)


My physics teacher remembers earlier versions of this book. Apparently it used to be a lot less Basically Decent. Sometimes he tells us the old versions of the problems that he remembers and, well, I can see why they revised! Can't remember any right now though.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Infornographer » Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:09 am UTC

Oh man, Barbara Ryden has a book called "Introduction to Cosmology" which she has just filled with jokes and the like. When I get the chance I'll post some direct quotes.
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby TheAmazingRando » Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:59 am UTC

I don't have it with me, but I had a math textbook in high school that always featured very ominous exponential growth problems.

"At 2:00 AM, Kate peered through her blinds. They were coming. If they increased at a rate of 12% per hour, and when Kate looked there were 14,000 of them, how many of them were there at 6:00 PM?"

I want that Physics textbook, though.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Force42 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:48 pm UTC

My AP Physics C textbook had an illustration of the Enterprise chasing an X-Wing (not to scale) for some sort of relativity concept. And on the front page was a picture of the Millennium Falcon. There was another illustration that had been somewhat "doctored," but I could tell it was supposed to be Luke's Landspeeder.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Force42 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:51 pm UTC

joeframbach wrote:
bbctol wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


I hope the line "Bring me my sword, ho!" was in bold.

I am being forced to read this in an English class of immature people right now. Shakespeare uses the interjection "Ho!" a lot. And it's funny every time.


I've gotta be honest. I LOL'd.


Ummm...I don't know what those MTV translators were smoking, but Romeo was supposed to be 19-23 ish and Juliet was in the 13-15 range. I'll bet they changed the age gap so they wouldn't give any middle school sluts any more ideas than they get on MTV anyways...

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Force42 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:58 pm UTC

Endless Mike wrote:
Ieatsoap6 wrote:
LittleChrist wrote:In middle school, we read the "Red Reader" version of Romeo and Juliet. The book contains the original play with page by page summaries of what is being said in the margin. However, the author has translated the text to be understood by, "children who were raised with MTV." Some of it is just ridiculous. I can't find my copy now, but I found this little bit online.

Character Summary:
Romeo- A 14-year-old lovesick dude in love with being in love; Lord Montague's only son.
Lord Capulet- Juliet's pop and a strait-up control [man].
Juliet- 13 years old, Lord Capulet's only daughter, and Romeo's eventual main squeeze.


Did it have a gun fight in it?

In my 12th grade AP English class, our final big assignment for the year (post AP tests) was a skit of King Lear. Traditionally, these skits brought out the worst in every class. One year had a simulated blow job complete with facial. So my group decided to make ours the bloodiest, goriest thing we could do. So we turned all the sword fights into gun fights using squirt guns with red dyed water, and got sticky eyeballs (think those sticky hands...only eyeballs), which we covered in fake blood, and threw at the walls. Last I saw, the blood trails were still there.



You did the skits in class? We did scenes from Hamlet as a final project (my group did a Star Wars Ep. III crossover/parody...it was hilarious...Bard Wars Episode I: Revenge of the Dane)...but ours were filmed. (We already did scenes in class...which got quite interesting...occasional gender-bending was really fun...especially since it was a Catholic school.) I had a Shakespeare class my first semester of college...even more acting...even more gender bending...and our final was a silent film of Hamlet.

How do you get a sword/gunfight out of King Lear? I don't remember there being an actual battle. Great idea with the sticky eyes, though.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Force42 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 5:03 pm UTC

Eps wrote:
ZeroSum wrote:My quantum book had an image of a live cat on the front and a dead (sleeping) cat on the back.

Griffiths? A few books have used the cat on the cover, but Griffiths is the most well-known. Although, now I think about it, the cat might have been climbing the 'ladder' on there...


I have a MATLAB book with a cat on it...we call it CATLAB...the cat in question is the author's/my professor's cat...very funny book:

"Here’s another common rookie error. If you were translating the following mathematical expression into MATLAB:
1/(2 square root(π))
You might be tempted to write something like this:
1 / 2 * sqrt(pi)
But that would be wrong. So very wrong."

You can get the book online here:
http://www.greenteapress.com/index.html

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TheAmazingRando
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby TheAmazingRando » Tue Feb 12, 2008 6:45 pm UTC

Force42 wrote:But that would be wrong. So very wrong."

That reminds me. I had a pre-calc book in my sophomore year of high school that had one section,
"You may be tempted to (some common but heinous error). NO! NO! NO!."
I don't remember what the topic was, but I remember my math teacher shouting it at the class and slamming the book down.

carls
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby carls » Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:33 pm UTC

My physics textbook contains warnings. Such as : "Warning, this book is made of matter, if it comes into contact with antimatter it will explode with the force of six billion tonnes of TNT and emmitt a huge amount of gamma radiation."

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11-Sodium
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby 11-Sodium » Thu Feb 14, 2008 9:59 pm UTC

I have the Jearl Walker book (Edition 8.), but only parts 3 and 4, which is apparently the wrong section. My roommate has parts 1 and 2, and he gets all the fun problems.
Apparently it is harder to fit penguins and other absurdities into electromagnetism than into mechanics, though one of the problems I found was in the section on circuits. It was a circuit with a motor for the load, and the motor was being used to raise a box with a penguin in it.
There was also a section with a picture of a goldfish in a bowl, sitting on a magnet suspended above a superconductor. The caption was
A disk-shaped magnet is levitated above a superconducting material that has been cooled by liquid nitrogen. The goldfish is along for the ride.

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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby ParanoidDrone » Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:43 am UTC

I want some of these textbooks. ;_; They would make Calculus so much more exciting. (Granted, it doesn't take much...)
Insert witty phrase here.

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Eschatokyrios
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Eschatokyrios » Mon Feb 18, 2008 7:26 am UTC

My high school AP chemistry textbook, on the whole, had fairly standard problems. But at the end of one section, there was a large, multi-step problem in which Lex Luther had to determine whether the kryptonite he had obtained from [some other Superman villian. Darkseid maybe? I don't remember who it was] was legit by measuring its molar mass. That was pretty much the only creative problem in the book, too, which made it all the more wtf-ish.
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Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Infornographer » Mon Feb 18, 2008 7:35 am UTC

Okay I promised excerpts from Ryden's book, so here they are:

In referring to Olbe's Paradox, she makes a footnote:

"The name "olber's Paradox" is thus a prime example of what historians of science jokingly call the law of misonomy: nothing is ever named after the person who really discovers it.

"By contrast, a plane geometry has infinite area and has no upper limits on the possible distance between points. Since the publishers objected to producing a book of infintie size, Figure 3.3 actually shows only a portion of a plane.

"The Friedman Equation is Very Important.*" and then the star has "*seriously, you should consider writing it on your forehead backwards so you can see it in the mirror." And then later on in the book when she derives the fluid equation, she has a footnote stating "Write it on your forehead underneath the Friedmann equation."
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