I have an awesome textbook

The school experience. School related queries, discussions, and stories that aren't specific to a subject.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
jaap
Posts: 2094
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:06 am UTC
Contact:

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby jaap » Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:59 pm UTC

My schoolbooks didn't have any funnies, though my physics teacher did set a neat test once about James Bond, that had questions like "Blofeld has caused a toxic rainstorm to erupt above Bond's head. Luckily, Q has equipped Bond with an umbrella. Given a rain speed of ...kph, at what angle must Bond hold his umbrella while running at ...kph?"

I once came across an interesting book for learning the Russian language. It is partially reproduced on the following site:
http://newstar.rinet.ru/~goga/biblio/lipson/lipson.html
It gives me the giggles every time. It has lots of recurring characters that either steal pencils and never wash, and others that work in a factory with enthusiasm.

Hit3k
Posts: 1156
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:12 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Hit3k » Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:58 pm UTC

jaap wrote:I once came across an interesting book for learning the Russian language. It is partially reproduced on the following site:
http://newstar.rinet.ru/~goga/biblio/lipson/lipson.html
It gives me the giggles every time. It has lots of recurring characters that either steal pencils and never wash, and others that work in a factory with enthusiasm.


Ah, Communism.... Russia's favourite pass time.
Sungura wrote:My mom made me watch a star wars. Two of them , actually. The Death Star one and the one where the dude ends up in the swamp with the weird guy who talks funny.

User avatar
Number3Pencils
The Torment of Existence Weighed against the Horror of Nonbeing
Posts: 516
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2007 6:27 am UTC
Location: Beyond reason, then take a left
Contact:

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Number3Pencils » Sun Feb 24, 2008 12:49 am UTC

My linguistics textbook discusses some neologistic compound phrases from Generation X. It gives a couple different ways you could interpret each one, without knowing what it means.

Contemporary Linguistics, fifth edition, William O'Grady et al. wrote:DUMPSTER CLOCKING
The tendency when looking at objects to guesstimate the amount of time they will eventually take to decompose: "Ski boots are the worst. Solid plastic. They'll be around till the sun goes supernova."

DUMPSTER CLOCKING [this is the real defitition, apparently]
Reckoning time by the amount and nature of the dumpster: "An old couch, three textbooks, and twenty pounds of notebooks beneath a case of empties. Must be late May."
Image
Spoiler:
Image

User avatar
nyeguy
Posts: 580
Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 5:59 pm UTC

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby nyeguy » Sun Feb 24, 2008 6:15 pm UTC

My Geometry textbook was awesome.

In the first chapter, there was a chapter on how geometric shapes are classified (or something like that), and it used the example of zoids. Zoids were blobs that had tails with triangle shapes on the end, and one square eye inside them. Later, in a chapter on quadrilaterals, they were showing examples of what were and weren't different shapes. For trapezoids, one of their "not" examples was a zoid caught in a mousetrap.

During the trig unit, there was a problem where a detective was trying to find the height of a building using a mirror. There was a picture with her in the middle of the street, with a mirror at her feet, and a bunch of cars backed up around her, and people yelling at her to move.
Image

olcaddy
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2008 8:24 pm UTC

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby olcaddy » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:42 am UTC

There is a MATLAB 7 tutorial written by a maths professor here at Ohio State University. I've not read all 144 pages but what I have some good bits. Part of the intro is as follows

"Don’t be afraid to make mistakes; MATLAB won’t call you an idiot for making a mistake. When you first learned to ride a bicycle, you fell down a lot — and you looked pretty silly."

The man was also a fan of Monty python particularly the flying circus series. "Monty Python" even shows up in the index pg 36 when strings are introduced. Some basic image commads are covered such as:

Code: Select all

>> load clown
>> image(X);
>> colormap(map)

Yeah there is a clown image bundled with all MATLAB releases (or at least 7 on i guess). Which reminds me about an interesting built in MATLAB function. Next time you get an error or dont know why something isnt working. type 'why' into the command window.

If you would like to peruse for the funnies or for a what seems to be an ok MATLAB intro it comes up as the first Google search for
ohio state matlab math .pdf

User avatar
Mister_Penguin
Posts: 210
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2007 6:56 am UTC
Location: Madison, WI

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Mister_Penguin » Fri Feb 29, 2008 3:08 am UTC

... Consider any wall outlet in your home. You could measure the exact voltage it is carrying, whether 120 volts or 115 volts or 118.6 volts, for example. However, the detection circuitry to determine only whether there is a voltage (Any of the above three will do) or whether there is no voltage is much simpler. Your finger casually inserted into the wall socket, for example will suffice.
I heart Patt and Patel, even if I loathe LC-3 (No bitwise or? What the fuck? I mean, yes, I know DeMorgan's law, but still.)

... add a method refuseHelp to the Greeter class. It should return a string such as "I am sorry, Dave. I am afraid I can't do that.
From one of my Freshman year CS texts.

A problem specifying a voting machine program, from the same text.
Extra credit if your program gives the nod to your favored party if the votes are tallied after 8 p.m. on the first Tuesday in November, but acts normally on all other dates
Suck it Diebold.
"Only on XKCD do we try to figure out which tessellating shape for burgers results in the least waste-meat." -aleflamedyud

pet
Posts: 65
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 2:02 am UTC

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby pet » Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:27 am UTC

I'll be honest: I haven't actually read my linguistics textbook since the beginning of the semester, but what I did read was truly awesome.

In the chapter on morphology (structure of words), specifically in the section on affixes (morphemes added to root words): [blah blah prefixes suffixes] Also, there are these things called infixes, which get inserted into the middle of the word, but they're pretty rare and don't really exist in English.

But there's an exception!

What follows: an entire page on the use of "fucking" as an infix in English.

The English expletive fucking (or as it is often pronounced in casual speech fuckin'), along with several other similar words, can be infixed into many words. (This infix fucking is an affective morpheme - it doesn't add lexical meaning, but its use reveals something about the speaker's attitude.)


It then goes on to list examples, like "Massafuckingchusetts", "Julius fucking Caesar" and "morphofuckinglogical", and detail the rules for the placement of "fucking" within a word or phrase.
"Look up 'idiot' in the dictionary. You know what you'll find?"
"A picture of me?"
"No! The definition of the word 'idiot', which you fucking are!"

User avatar
3tard
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 12:53 am UTC
Location: The Berkshires

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby 3tard » Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:20 am UTC

pet wrote:
The English expletive fucking (or as it is often pronounced in casual speech fuckin'), along with several other similar words, can be infixed into many words. (This infix fucking is an affective morpheme - it doesn't add lexical meaning, but its use reveals something about the speaker's attitude.)


It then goes on to list examples, like "Massafuckingchusetts", "Julius fucking Caesar" and "morphofuckinglogical", and detail the rules for the placement of "fucking" within a word or phrase.


i may have found the book on google books for those interested.
http://books.google.com/books?id=DObARq ... VTcI&hl=en

pet
Posts: 65
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 2:02 am UTC

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby pet » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:54 am UTC

Yep, that's the one!

User avatar
BlackSails
Posts: 5315
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 5:48 am UTC

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby BlackSails » Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:12 pm UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:Anyone else have a textbook with a sense of humor?


I have heard of a diff eq textbook that has you solve problems such as the best placement of speakers - so your roommate cant hear anything.

My physics textbook had problems like the following:

A young mafioso has married a beautiful wagnerian opera singer. However, he finds he does not like wangerian opera. He straps his wife to a car, and sends her at a brick wall at 30 m/s. His wife however, is well-versed in physics, and knows that if she sings at the right pitch (f=some number), the wall will shatter. At what frequency must she sing so that wall is subjected to a frequency of f? Also, what frequency will she here reflected from the wall just before she hits?

User avatar
Sulla158
Posts: 139
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 2:12 am UTC
Location: KY, USA

Re: I have an awesome textbook

Postby Sulla158 » Wed Apr 16, 2008 1:14 am UTC

I had a Biology book that I used to look through for the great pictures. The best physics problem I've ever done begins with, "Jane, while wearing a jetpack...".
The fact is, knife fights are a big part of being an adult. - The Slant


Return to “School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests